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Shark taken by bigger predator, what?

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posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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Two of the possibilities are mentioned in the article: Killer whale and other sharks.

I suggest it was initially attacked by a killer whale, escaped, and was attacked by a shark in the depths, attracted to either the first shark bleeding or it appearing weak (sharks are known to attack other "disabled/weak looking" sharks).
edit on 3-11-2013 by tehdouglas because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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Sounds like it was in fact eaten. And a Giant squid or Octopus could be the culprit due to the temp change is actually the sharks blood being registered not the eaters temp or the waters any longer.
Something with teeth and a healthy appetite.

en.wikipedia.org...



To more successfully hunt fast and agile prey such as sea lions, the great white has adapted to maintain a body temperature warmer than the surrounding water. One of these adaptations is a "rete mirabile" (Latin for "wonderful net"). This close web-like structure of veins and arteries, located along each lateral side of the shark, conserves heat by warming the cooler arterial blood with the venous blood that has been warmed by the working muscles. This keeps certain parts of the body (particularly the stomach) at temperatures up to 14 °C (25 °F)[30] above that of the surrounding water,



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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this is the damage a 20ft plus great white can do on a 10ft great white:-



www.telegraph.co.uk...

So, could the tracker have been taken in one bite by a larger shark, obviously.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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maybe an descendant of megladon



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 





Australia... where the animals on land rival the animals in the water for being the most dangerous predators.


Just see if you can name three land based predators in Australia. Just three would do. Thanks.

P



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


Octopus ?? Doubt it, but a 60 foot Squid, uuuuuuuuuum Possible



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 05:20 PM
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dashen
Cmon guys, am i the only one thinking Godzilla?
Y'know, with fukushima and all. Maybe......


Spot on. Not just one but a school of them.

This would explain animal die offs, and the abundance of methane gas being measured in the oceans.

These godzillas are farting. farts = methane gas.

Its the only good theory out there
edit on 3021x6730America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago11 by six67seven because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


That can't be a serious question, but off the top of my head -- cassowary, Tasmanian devil, and dingo.

Why are you even replying in a cryptozoology thread? I can tolerate ignorance, but not when coupled with condescending arrogance.

The "bloop" is a great example of the mysteries which still lie beneath the waves. I don't think any known species fits the bill here. Geologic activity may actually have killed the shark, its decomposing body left drifting with the current.

Or maybe a leviathan lives its entire lifespan in the abyss. After seeing the fabled giant squid dragged up from the depths, I no longer doubt that huge creatures can exist outside of known taxonomy.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by OpenMindedRealist
 


I was replying to another post for a start which claimed that Australia has some 'most dangerous predators.' I have spent time in the bush and 'what most dangerous predators?' comes to mind. None of the ones you mention are 'most dangerous.' They just run away!

As for the question from the OP I would suggest that the depth reading works on pressure data. As such I would then ask 'what is the pressure inside an orca's digestive system. I would question if the digestive system fluctuates with depth and as such the tag may have simply been subject to external pressure. It may even have been stuck somewhere giving the illusion of pressure.

Oh, thanks for the snide comments.

P



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


I have spent time at 600m with killer whales; they just swim away.

See? I can do it, too.
edit on 3-11-2013 by OpenMindedRealist because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 06:27 PM
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This mystery seems to begin and end with the Documentary's film maker. This event occurred 10 yrs ago but I can't find any source of the original scientific information.

This was either an orca, another larger great white, or Aquaman.
I think what is misleading is the part about tag remaining in depths when what I have found says VARYING depths.

What is a shame is this documentary looks amazing and it about quite a bit more than the shark death.

These frozen hydrocarbon reefs are causing this massive eco system of marine life to appear.

Yet all we get in America is bs fake documentaries about megladon and mermaids!



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by borntowatch
 


Giant squid?

They live down deep I believe and could easily kill a large shark



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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Well the synopsis for the show says "..This is the story of a super predators underwater attack that leads investigators to a mysterious natural phenomenon that attracts the oceans most fearsome predators.. "

So doesnt sound like any giant sea monsters were involved, This time

www.abc.net.au...



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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Search for the super predator


here is the documentary for those in australia (and asia i believe)

google it from here.
i watched MOSt of this but started flicking channels before the end... there was a JFK think on SBS about a second shooter maybe being a misfire from a secret service agent

way more interesting than sharks!



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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The sperm whale is not a species I'd rule out. It is the largest of the toothed whales afterall. Other than that, the same varieties of giant squid that the sperm whale supposedly preys upon.

There could always be something else out there we still don't know about, oceans are pretty big afterall. But if that's the case, it's something that's also pretty rare.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


Three land based predators in Australia?

Northbridge Aboriginals
Dancing King Browns
Drop Bears (ok ok ok ..)
Ivan Milat Copycats



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


Brown funnel.
Taipan.
Saltwater croc.

Then you have anomals that shouldn't be poisonous/venomous like yhe platypus. You have other deadly snakes and spiders. Giant poisionous centipede.
Uou have ocean animals that shouldn't be poisonous like blue ring octopus and that one snail. Box jellyfish.

All kinda junk.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


ROFL. We have predators, just none in the 'most dangerous' group. The initial line,




Australia... where the animals on land rival the animals in the water for being the most dangerous predators.



is way over the top and just a silly bit of the usual MSM over the top crapola.

P



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 09:10 PM
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dashen
Cmon guys, am i the only one thinking Godzilla?
Y'know, with fukushima and all. Maybe......


Yes...you are the only one.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 10:34 PM
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A few years ago, I heard a discussion on the Coast-To-Coast radio program about the possibility of a real Leviathon type creature living deep in the ocean. The guest had some stories on how both U.S. and Russian subs have encountered "something huge" down there. The encounters were very rare and they don't make the news. There was a supposed encounter where something came up 'out of nowhere' from the depths and bumped a Soviet Typhoon class nuclear sub hard enough to nearly spin it around. We're talking about a 600-foot long submarine.






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