Shark taken by bigger predator, what?

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posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 10:19 AM
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Just throwing this out there....I read an article maybe a year or so ago about a large seal killing smaller sharks...its rare but happens....curious if this seal got a taste for shark and took a bite at the great white hitting the external tag.

Just throwing that option out there even though I know it doesn't solve/answer all the questions.

edit on 3-11-2013 by cosmicexplorer because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by cosmicexplorer
 


Doubtful...it stayed at varying depths for about a week....seals need air.

Anyway, we won't have to wait long for an answer...


And having solved the original mystery of who killed the shark by the end of the film....

The Search for the Ocean's Super Predator will screen on ABC 1 at 7.30pm on November 3


Anybody watching this? Please report back what it was...

Peace



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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I'm going with Killer Whale. There's video somewhere on the internet of a young bull Orca killing a great white in close proximity to his pod. The people recording suspected it was a display to show the pod "hey, I'm an adult now, and I'm a badass"... similar to humans in their late teens early 20s minus the great white.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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operation mindcrime
reply to post by Klassified
 


Yeah but how can the sensor go from 8 degrees (water temp) to 26 degrees while remaining at the same depth inside a coldblooded animal?

Peace

Without knowing more details, it's hard to say. There could be a few reasons. Malfunction, currents, etc.



Anybody watching this? Please report back what it was...

I'm going with the Octo, though there are other possibilities, obviously. It will be interesting, no matter what the reality ends up being.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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can't read the article now, is It certain yhe shark was eaten? Because if that's the case my bet would be killer whale.. I think they could easily dive to that depth and probably do searching for squid and whateber else.



Or an unknown behavior is that sharks enjoy and maybe use the warm water provided by under sea vents? I don't know if they know the floor od the area the shark went to, but is it possible that it is warmer because of vents spewing super heated material and making the water there warmer?



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:37 AM
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operation mindcrime
reply to post by Klassified
 


Yeah but how can the sensor go from 8 degrees (water temp) to 26 degrees while remaining at the same depth inside a coldblooded animal?

Peace

well technicaly a great white shark is coldblooded but in fact it does regulate its temperature..it is warmer than the surrounding waters, i will have to fact find what temp they can maintain.
a whale of any sort is not possible due to not surfacing for a week..now there is speculation about megalodon(giant prehistoric shark) still lurking the depths, it was supposed to have died out millions of years ago but a tooth was found within the last hundred years that dated about 10,000 years old..dating method is questioned though. great whites have remained unchanged for millions of years so its plausible that a megalodon can/could of regulated body temp as well.
based on what i can find about the great whites body temp i might go with a bigger great white. i dont believe a squid or octopi can raise their body temp.
edit on 3-11-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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Wow. What a strange and interesting topic.

If the tag device had to be recovered and plugged into a computer to read the data... then the tag wasn't transmitting the info to the surface, so the depth information recovered from the tag is probably accurate!

Note also that the Shark reached 580M depth BEFORE the temperature increased dramatically.

Giant/Colossal Squid are indeed cold blooded, so would not cause a sudden temperature change in the tag, if the shark was eaten by one.

Killer Whale? Well, someone mentioned that Killer Whales can't dive to 580M because they breathe air? But, apparently one was found entangled in a submarine cable 3375ft (over 1000M) deep! See wikianswers here so it's probable that they can indeed dive that deep if they need to, but there's no way that it could remain submerged (at varying depths) for a week!

What does that leave us with?
A mystery!

If anyone sees the show could they please update the thread with the answer??

cheers!
GTD



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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Just to throw it out for discussion but perhaps "The Bloop", as it's come to be known, wasn't ice calving after all. It was heard 3,000 miles away and initially thought to be biologic in origin. The only reason that explanation wasn't taken and accepted outright was the SIZE it would have to be. Estimates for a living creature to have generated that ran up to 10 x's that for a whale.

I think the ocean has many mysteries yet to pose and many answers we'll be shocked to learn as time goes on. Just my feeling here.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 11:45 AM
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i think we know more of the moon than the bottom of the ocean



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 12:36 PM
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Is it possible that the tag simply fell off, and the shark turned round and ate it ?

Whites can have a body temp around 14 C higher than the surrounding water.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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Are there any reports of thermal vents in that area? If so that could explain the temp rise.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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Any of the suggestions can be ruled out by looking at what we know.. the depth, temperature and length of time submerged.

It is plausible that there are many undiscovered species on the planet and this could well be one of them. Giant monsters roamed the planet many years ago and still do today.

Megaladon. Hmmm it's plausible, though something of that size would need alot of food to fill that size belly and I can't help but think it would come to surface to sustain its ability to survive, and in doing so would be spotted more often.

I'm going fully out of the box in ATS style and suggest, what if it has to do with an underwater base or the planet being seeded by a species off world.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by borntowatch
 


big ass squids



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by borntowatch
 


I'm betting on a giant Squid or the even larger Colossal Squid.

The buggers can grow to around 14 meters.

Should be able to grab, crush and munch up a 3 meter shark quite easily.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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It's the KRACKEN ! .. Living in an area where there are thermal vents to keep warm.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 02:17 PM
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Wrabbit2000
Just to throw it out for discussion but perhaps "The Bloop", as it's come to be known, wasn't ice calving after all. It was heard 3,000 miles away and initially thought to be biologic in origin. The only reason that explanation wasn't taken and accepted outright was the SIZE it would have to be. Estimates for a living creature to have generated that ran up to 10 x's that for a whale.

I think the ocean has many mysteries yet to pose and many answers we'll be shocked to learn as time goes on. Just my feeling here.


I was thinking of the bloop as well, you beat me to it!

I was going to volunteer to watch the follow up but ABC1 is in australia!!!! wrong country, no can do....hopeful one of our aussie posters will catch it for us!
edit on 3-11-2013 by research100 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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My guess would be a giant squid. Who's to say at that 580m depth, there wasn't' t some kind of geo-thermal venting taking place that would afford a change in body temp of a large cold blooded predator. Areas of large underwater thermal venting are ripe with varying types of sea life at much greater depths than 580m. Which could also offer stable food source for such a predictor.

Just my two cents.
Edit. And it would be a really sweet place to hang while digesting a seriously wicked meal.
edit on 3-11-2013 by twohawks because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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Was the tag designed to fall off on it's own after a period of time? The article states that it had been at various depths at that temperature for about a week, but it doesn't mention whether or not it surfaced. Sperm whales can dive to 3000meters and have an average body temperature of 33 Celsius, but they have to surface every 80 minutes. If you were looking for a new species of super predator that would be a good place to look. If it stayed below the surface beyond the sperm whales maximum time limits then it has to be something else, and probably not a mammal but still probably warm blooded. Also these types of stories often entice government agencies to fund more research, they increase book sales and ratings for shows, so you have to remember there is always the chance that situations like this are the result of conflicts of interest among some biologists.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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Maybe the shark dived down 580 meters, took a heart attack and got lodged in a crevice for a week....Just as a plausible as a giant shark eating whatever...Things die unexpectedly....even sharks.



posted on Nov, 3 2013 @ 03:17 PM
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Thermal vents/thermocline/uprising gulfstream ? The very reason for a hotspot could be a vertical uprise of warmer water, causing plankton/small fish/predators to stay on this spot.
A medium great white hunted down to the shelf by a bigger shark (huge great white/hammerhead) or killerwhale (they can definately dive to 600 meters) got bitten into pieces with the responder in contact with the warmer hotspot water area until it comes loose from the dead shark remains and washed up to the surface, explaing the 26 C....

Just a theory...





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