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Comet Ison 'Looking Odd'

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posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


Nice speech, irrelevant to the questions about comet's path but nice, I guess.




posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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Presume that Ison is a Antimatterbomb from another starsystem because of it's odd appearence it could blow up our sun right?



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


Denny is this thing going to cause a "X" emp from the sun??



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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waverlyhills
This comet is strange and mysterious in both scientific ways and speculation aspects.


No, it's entirely unstrange and unmysterious in scientific ways - it's just strange and mysterious as to why all the hoaxers hit on this snowball and not any of the others currently passing through the inner Solar System.



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


More like 3 miles in diameter

www.cometison2013.co.uk...



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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AndyMayhew
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


More like 3 miles in diameter

www.cometison2013.co.uk...




Yeah, quite a difference. I went back and saw that I read it wrong. It said meters NOT kilometers.

Too late to edit my post but thanks for the correction.



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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Good day/evening to you all...I wonder if someone might point me to some information regarding Isons predicted time-line?...If it survives the sun when will it escape its gravity (head back out) and when will it be closest to earth...thanks in anticipation.



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 03:31 PM
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F4Driver
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


Denny is this thing going to cause a "X" emp from the sun??


I doubt it but you can quote me on this, I don't know.

What reason is there to suspect it would?



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 04:04 PM
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captiva
Good day/evening to you all...I wonder if someone might point me to some information regarding Isons predicted time-line?...If it survives the sun when will it escape its gravity (head back out) and when will it be closest to earth...thanks in anticipation.



This comet is on a close encounter with the Sun on November 28, 2013 (Thanksgiving day in the U.S.), when it will pass at a distance of only 2.7 solar radii from the center of the Sun.

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...
Scroll down a little to view the animated graphs there.


The closest it will come to Earth will be about 40 million miles on Dec. 26.

news.discovery.com...



posted on Nov, 5 2013 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


Thank you so much for your reply and information....

Respects to you


edit on 5-11-2013 by captiva because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


Is 40 million miles away from us near enough to cause plasma interaction with us? More X-flares? And even before that, ISON has a rendezvous with Mercury on 12 November, followed by NASA on 13th and its 'dramatic' announcement (?)


edit on 6-11-2013 by mclinking because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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captiva
Good day/evening to you all...I wonder if someone might point me to some information regarding Isons predicted time-line?...If it survives the sun when will it escape its gravity (head back out) and when will it be closest to earth...thanks in anticipation.


Surely passing so close to the sun will change its exit path drastically from predictions since its going to lose much of its mass [potentially] ?



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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DenyObfuscation
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


Nice speech, irrelevant to the questions about comet's path but nice, I guess.


Thank you for the appreciation.... I don't see a star though so therefore I must conclude that your comment was sarcastic...

lowest form of Wit....

I believe it was relevant to the thread... since it talks about the oddness of the comet... Show me a comet that is 'Normal' and then let's make the judgment shall we?

Korg.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by Biigs
 


no. the comet's mass isn't a factor when calculating its orbit, so the orbit will remain unchanged.
did you bother to read this thread?

reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


not everyone stars every post he agrees with. i don't.

and phage's answer in this matter is simply scientifically sound. unless, of course, you claim that kepler was wrong and you are right. otherwise, attacking him simply because he's the most known person here to deny astronomy-related BS, is the lowest form of wit.

and while i agree that the show that ISON will give us is anyone's guess, ISON's orbit will not change - and we've had our share of physics deniers in this thread, so comments about ISON being unpredictable more often than not come along the statements like 'it will loose half of its mass and hit the earth! we are DOOMED!'.
edit on 6-11-2013 by jedi_hamster because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 





I believe it was relevant to the thread


I didn't say it wasn't.

2nd chance, I said


Nice speech, irrelevant to the questions about comet's path but nice, I guess.


See the difference?



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by AndyMayhew
 


I'm guessing it might be due to the initial reports that ISON was possibly going to be so spectacular that you could even see it in broad daylight for a brief time?

I know that made me sit up and take notice in an "Oh, cool!" way. I was quite looking forward to it. Too bad that's not going to happen.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


not everyone stars every post he agrees with. i don't.

and phage's answer in this matter is simply scientifically sound. unless, of course, you claim that kepler was wrong and you are right. otherwise, attacking him simply because he's the most known person here to deny astronomy-related BS, is the lowest form of wit.

and while i agree that the show that ISON will give us is anyone's guess, ISON's orbit will not change - and we've had our share of physics deniers in this thread, so comments about ISON being unpredictable more often than not come along the statements like 'it will loose half of its mass and hit the earth! we are DOOMED!'.
edit on 6-11-2013 by jedi_hamster because: (no reason given)


Sorry I guess I carry baggage from a previous thread....

Yes Phage Appears to be knowledgeable but believe me he is not always right. Anyone whom claims to know everything about a subject as wide as physics should be looked upon as fools folly.

I also concur that the mass of the Comet has little to do with it's local trajectory as this is caused by the gravitational field of the sun and was either set the last time it sling shot around Sol or the moment it left the Oort cloud..

However you have to factor in the mass of the object when calculating it's next orbit as this would effect the radius of the elliptical orbit, though given the values we are talking about... nothing notable... given that it's such a small mass to begin with.

There is absolutely nothing to be concerned about this comet, it is not a danger to us now or in the far future... We should all worry about the comet they didn't see coming rather than the one they wanted to see but were disappointed.

Peace,

Korg.


edit on 6-11-2013 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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DenyObfuscation
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 





I believe it was relevant to the thread


I didn't say it wasn't.

2nd chance, I said


Nice speech, irrelevant to the questions about comet's path but nice, I guess.


See the difference?


I apologize if you didn't mean that sarcastically... as I mentioned baggage from a previous encounter.

Sorry.

I responded to the OP and hence why the post may have seemed a bit disjointed to the current discussion.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


There won't be a next orbit; ISON will leave the Sun on a path that will take it beyond the Sun's gravitational influence.

Based purely on the two-body model (the Sun and ISON), the exiting trajectory again does not depend on ISON's mass or density. But as ISON might be passing other planets on its way out, its trajectory might be influenced by them. Thing is, astronomers have enough data to calculate this influence, and adjust the exiting trajectory accordingly. As I mentioned before in this thread, celestial and orbital mechanics have been known for hundreds of years. In that respect, the Solar System is like clockwork: given certain parameters, we can predict with great certainty where things will be in future. This is why scientists can plan a space mission for a probe to rendezvous with a comet or asteroid years ahead of the actual rendezvous.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 01:41 PM
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ketsuko
reply to post by AndyMayhew
 


I'm guessing it might be due to the initial reports that ISON was possibly going to be so spectacular that you could even see it in broad daylight for a brief time?

I know that made me sit up and take notice in an "Oh, cool!" way. I was quite looking forward to it. Too bad that's not going to happen.


It's still possible and certainly the only one of the comets currently in the inner System than may become naked eye visible. I'm hopefull, mainly because it's a good few years since I managed to photograph a comet (McNaught in 2007)



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