This is the amazing Lockheed Martin SR-72—the space Blackbird

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posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 04:54 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I suppose I chose my words poorly. Be nice, I'm a High School dropout.

So why not a 'traditional' fuel tank that wouldn't leak like a sieve (or melt)? I'm assuming because the plane needed to carry a lot of 'go juice' and that wouldn't be possible with a normal gas tank like you see on a car. So it was a flying gas tank? How were pilots able to adjust for the differing weight between missions? Was it easy since she 'liked to fly'? Just a man up kind of deal? When she's half full she flies different, get used to it?

Was this safe? Or at least relatively safe? Were there accidents? I don't know enough about JP-7 and the additives. If the stuff was spilling all over were there worries about sparks? My guess is no, drop a match in gasoline and it goes out. How much actually leaked? If it was my car and a thimble of gas poured out every minute (which has happened thank you MOPAR fuel lines) I would be a little freaked out. Are those reports alarmist/shenanigans?




posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

Because a traditional fuel tank uses rubber bladders inside it. The only way that it could be done was to give it expansion room for in flight.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




The only way that it could be done was to give it expansion room for in flight.


But that means it would have leaked Fuuuuuuu!

Really dumb question, would the fuel also expand? So it couldn't be a traditional container? The 'tank' had to expand with the fuel?

You should tell me to just quit, but I'm not going to do it.
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posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

As the airframe heated up as speed increased (air friction) the body of the aircraft would expand. Since the fuel tanks on the aircraft are usually in the wings/body, basically everywhere they could get an open space, this area would also expand since it was in relative closer proximity to areas of extreme heat.
A traditional "tank" like on a car would expand and crack under these conditions and any rubber gaskets would fail under the conditions the aircraft was subjected to, so they had no choice but to "let it leak" so to speak.
I'm not an SR-71 expert but I believe they would refuel shortly after take-off to replenish any lost fuel due to leaking.
And yes, JP-7 won't just ignite spontaneously so the leaked fuel isn't a huge danger while it's sitting on the ground.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Thank you. You guys should never ask me questions just after I wake up after a short night of sleep.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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Yes the first thing the sr-71 did after takeoff was refuel. And that was after they would fly mach 1-2 to seal up all the leaks first. Lol



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: boomer135

The English Electric Lightning had similar fuel-leaking problems on the ground. It gets very hot at Mach 3, to the extent that the SR-71 pilots could warm up their MRE tubes by holding them against the inside of the cockpit glass.

Why I can say 'window' here but not where 'glass' is I have no idea, but it censors it there.
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edit on 9-8-2014 by Araqiel because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-8-2014 by Araqiel because: (no reason given)





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