Dream Chaser crash lands in first glide test

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posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 07:43 PM
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The Sierra Nevada Dream Chaser was released from a helicopter in its first glide test. The ship was able to intercept the glide slope, and line itself up perfectly with the centerline of the runway at Edwards.

The problem came when it was time to land. The nose skid, and right main deployed and locked, but the left main never came out of the wheel well. The computer did everything possible to keep the wing off the ground, but eventually they were slow enough that it had to come down.

Initial reports said the craft flipped, but Sierra Nevada has said that it skidded off the runway, and did not flip, but did suffer some structural damage. They said that the crew would have survived fine if there had been anyone on board.

They have video of the landing, up until just before touchdown, but they haven't released anything from touchdown on.

Flightglobal

edit on 10/29/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 08:05 PM
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Say, that's pretty nifty. What the heck would you use it for though? It's awfully small.



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 08:36 PM
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Not a total fail I guess, but still a fail if they wont let us see the rest of the footage.



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 08:50 PM
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Nice looking craft and nice everything except the landing!

Would love to see the rest of the footage, typical corporation BS cutting it early.

These things happen. Better now than much later!

P



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by Restricted
 


It would be capable of carrying crew up to the ISS, or replacing the Soyuz escape capsule. It will be capable of carrying 7 crew to low earth orbit, and is reusable.



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


The approach and initial touchdown were perfect. Unfortunately, the left main gear didn't deploy. As the vehicle slowed down and settled to the ground, it began to drag on the left side and veered off the runway. When it hit the dirt, it rolled several times but eventually came to rest upright. It was horrible to watch - and the sound was just brutal - but the vehicle came through it all surprisingly well. The damage is repairable and mostly (well,...mostly) cosmetic. Most significant is that the vehicle performed exactly as predicted during flight, all systems were still functional after the craft came to rest, and it would have been a survivable event if a crew was on board. The flight met all planned milestones and provided a wealth of data. This is what flight testing is all about.

I wish SNC would be more forthcoming to the public with the details because the vehicle's condition (despite what it went through) is a real testament to the designers and builders. I wish I could say more, but I can't. Sorry. Maybe someday the company will release the full landing video and photos of the damage. Prepare to be impressed (someday).



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 

Way back in the 60s we were doing lifting body test which you are no doubt aware of. What gets me (bugs) is since the 60s other than materials, and computer flight systems to control an aircraft nothing has really changed... Where are the scientist that once built the X-15 and put men on the moon with less computing power than many digital watches worn today....

I think All the test of the lifting bodies of the 60s at least the darn gear deployed! Most of our airliners today can fly a complete route and even land at a destination half way around the world.. They can't even drop something and have it land without incident... Kinda pisses me off... But thanks for posting S&F




posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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The fluffy dice hehe.

Its illegal here to have fluffy dice hanging in your car lol

This looks promising.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by Shadowhawk
 


I'm already impressed just from what I've seen and read. It was a beautiful test, up until the gear failed to come down.

The most important aspect though is that the crew would have come through it alive. That's all that matters.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 08:17 AM
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Looks like the thing the Bionic Man Crashed in....I remember that terrible Day...every Saturday around 17:30 hours..



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by amraks
 


I thought that was a great touch.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by amraks
 


The fluffy dice are only taped up inside the windscreen. The fact that they stayed put throughout the incident gives some indication that the lateral forces weren't too severe. It appears to have been a survivable accident.

Other low lift/drag vehicles have suffered rollovers that were survivable. The X-15 rolled when one landing skid collapsed during a heavy touchdown. The pilot only injured his back because he jettisoned the canopy before the vehicle turned over. The M2-F2 lifting body tumbled and rolled across the lakebed after touching down before the gear was fully deployed. The pilot's injuries were, again, due to the loss of the canopy. He would have healed up just fine, and only lost his eye due to an infection he picked up in the hospital.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by Shadowhawk
 


It's a testament to the builders and designers that all those craft, including this one, came through those accidents so well. I'll be looking forward to more glide tests once the repairs are done. This one was impressive as hell to watch, considering everything went so well on the first "flight", except the actual landing. Although even that could be considered a success since the crew would have survived.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 09:42 AM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by Restricted
 


It would be capable of carrying crew up to the ISS, or replacing the Soyuz escape capsule. It will be capable of carrying 7 crew to low earth orbit, and is reusable.


Geez, it doesn't look that big.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by Restricted
 


It doesn't, but it's bigger on the inside.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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Watched the video another couple of times. That is a sweet little ride.

I'm happy to see we're trying to reenter the "shuttle" arena.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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I think that lifting body in six million dollar man was called 'dynasoar'? Nice to see the concept being given another try.



posted on Oct, 30 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Very cool....all I could think of when I was watching though was "The license plate said Fresh and it had dice in the mirror"....call me old school.



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