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Pro liers not happy about being outed on primetime TV? Or society itself afraid of TV reality

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posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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So… Netflix, being as useless as it is, often drums up a few good gems in the TV Show department, and when I have time I enjoy sitting back for a little marathon.

I just got onto the show "Lie to Me" which was originally aired on Fox and carried for 3 seasons. Ratings were around 5-6 million per episode.

Lie to me - IMDB

Fox ran "Chicago code" as a replacement and it did close to the same numbers. A little better in fact, 5-8 million viewers per episode.

Chicago Code IMDB

Now… I saw a thread on GLP while looking into why it was cancelled. Someone posited the question, was it cancelled because politicians hated seeing their faces on TV caught in lies, anger, malevolent poses, etc.

I can't really run with that idea, given that the replacement show had better numbers and it too was cancelled.

However, Lie to Me, was a damn good show. I would put it on par with Law & Order, which was one of the longest running shows on TV. For anyone with an analytical mind, rationale, logic, it's a hoot. Not because it's 100% fact based fantasy, but because it's fantasy with a very decent foothold in science and human nature. Forget the science for a bit, the intuition we have catching each other in lies, is well represented in this show. And for some of us, we just love busting up lies, whether or not we ever get "official" confirmation, it's more about just knowing that we're not crazy, right?

How many times can you watch a politician lie their ass off, and call it, but have someone think there is something wrong with you because you won't put up with the official story. (I have a feeling a few members on here know what I'm talking about.)

Acknowledging the world is full of liars is a dangerous game. You have to be very careful not to create your own delusions. The best approach is a very uncommitted position which doesn't affect you either way. (See: Questioning the official version vs. newspapering your walls thinking the microwaves are going to get you.)

The show, is backed on real data from a prominent psychologist:


In Lie to Me, Tim Roth plays Dr. Cal Lightman, a deception consultant and expert. But Lightman doesn't rely on some futuristic mind-reading tricks cooked up by TV writers. Instead, his character is based on clinical psychologist Paul Ekman, a leading expert on lie detection. PM's Digital Hollywood asked Ekman how well his life and research translate to the small screen, delving into the science behind Fox's latest drama.

Read more: The Real Science Behind Lie to Me - Lie to Me Episodes - Popular Mechanics
Follow us: @PopMech on Twitter | popularmechanics on Facebook
Visit us at PopularMechanics.com


www.popularmechanics.com...

Now, my point in all this, is that a show like this which very aggressively points out the fact that we are all liars (which I think has been more than proven in this day and age) is not popular but should be. As they say the first step in fixing something is admitting you have a problem.

Personally, I have ran with this notion for nearly most my life. I even encourage people in my inner circle to hold the same feelings. We all chalk it up to human nature. Heck, we love busting each other when that nature comes out and we're not ashamed about it.

(The girlfriend's have never been happy about this. They always want everything to be about "trust", and I say, YES! I trust you to lie!"

Admitting our nature, helps us break down the walls which allows us to deceive others, and most importantly ourselves.

So, in conclusion, I'd ask, was the show not popular because people don't want to admit it, don't want to hear what we are really like? Not enough fantasy? Many online petitions popped up when it was cancelled, it had a pretty good cult following… I am sure some people are wired the same as myself, and just can't wait to either get busted in a lie or bust someone.

Question is: Which one are you?
edit on 27-10-2013 by boncho because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


It doesn't have to be your nature...
You can choose to be better.



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 02:06 PM
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TheOnlyAnswer
reply to post by boncho
 


It doesn't have to be your nature...
You can choose to be better.


Well, it's human nature (As in it is with us for life). I agree. We have to recognize our nature before making an attempt to change it however.



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Hey Boncho, thanks for the show suggestions. Lie to Me sounds especially intriguing.

Historically, there was only one person who could tell royalty the truth about themselves right to their faces: the court jester. The "Fool" was usually able to get away with it because "oy hey I was only joking Highness." So jesters had a lesser chance of being executed than, say, a general who told truth to power.

At least, that is what I've heard. In actual practice, I'd rather take on the increased risk of execution than the silly hat and makeup.

If you're on Netflix and interested in political-themed shows, I assume you've watched House of Cards, yes? If so, what did you think of it?



posted on Oct, 27 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by gravitationalethics

If you're on Netflix and interested in political-themed shows, I assume you've watched House of Cards, yes? If so, what did you think of it?

 


I watched one episode, haven't got into it. Depends on my mood what I watch, to be honest. But I'm sure I'll get around to it…

Cheers.



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