Irish Christian postulates land bridge in 655AD

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posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.




posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 06:39 PM
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oooohhh a bit brief there bud in the history of that islands there has been a lot of going and coming at times. Scotland was all but empty then the irish came over and vice versa .

if it was not for the irish the name of jesus would have all but have vanished from history at one stage but our group of islands might have not always been islands in pre -history .

legends do say of lands out to sea which in the fullness of time have been proved to be right stumps of trees under the english channel for example .

need more input on this bro



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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geobro
Scotland was all but empty then the irish came over and vice versa .


I acknowledge Irish Immigration too Scotland through the centuries, but too say Scotland was ''All But Empty'' is not quite right! Scotland or Caledonia had a good population in the North, Central and Borders regions.

The Romans Built a wall to keep them out of their empire. You don't build Hadrian's wall against a ''All but empty'' region of people.

Caledonians



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by TSOM87
 


It is not that regions were empty but that new populations replace old.



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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TSOM87

geobro
Scotland was all but empty then the irish came over and vice versa .


I acknowledge Irish Immigration too Scotland through the centuries, but too say Scotland was ''All But Empty'' is not quite right! Scotland or Caledonia had a good population in the North, Central and Borders regions.

The Romans Built a wall to keep them out of their empire. You don't build Hadrian's wall against a ''All but empty'' region of people.

Caledonians that is modern history to this people culloden/boyne whatever was last week in those lands some parts of scotland are 60 miles from east coast to west coast does not take much of a wave to wash over it to clear the ground .

that is why i never judge a book by the cover [ look it to the hungarian launguage in south america for a start .

i am no expert on the subject but i do know deep down we are all jock thomsons bairns i do not need david icke to tell me WE ARE ALL CONNECTED .


it was this pleb
that read a book of his and e-mailed him to go look at the moon
.

next thing good old dave has a revolation about the moon
.

i stopped telling irish jokes a long long time ago can you tell who the NEW irish are
study the geology theres a bomb in the building
edit on 19/10/13 by geobro because: fkn tippsy or is it tipsy



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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FreeMason
Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.


Am not really getting the point of this thread. Wee bit brief in the OP, what`s the question???



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 08:07 PM
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FreeMason
reply to post by TSOM87
 


It is not that regions were empty but that new populations replace old.


Yeah sure, not arguing that point. Just the ''All but empty'' comment.

Sorry for changing the direction of the thread.



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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Is this coming in installments or what ?



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 08:18 PM
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fenian8

FreeMason
Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.


Am not really getting the point of this thread. Wee bit brief in the OP, what`s the question???
you ken yer man in gladiator [ he touched me ] long b4 jimmy saville ]
yes quotations
.


they walled us in remember that they walled us in the jocks and the irish are joined at the hip .

when i am asked are you a [tim ] celtic or a prody [ protestant ] .

i reply that my KIN have been aruond a lot longer ???????? .

i'm on the planet for a good time not a long time a.t./s PARTY


AND THATS ALL I GOT TO SAY ON THAT
edit on 19/10/13 by geobro because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by fenian8
 


DOUGAL lets go for a bevvy
you know [ ken] you want 2 name yer place go on go on go on
bro g
pisse heed extrordinare



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 10:04 PM
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geobro

fenian8

FreeMason
Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.


Am not really getting the point of this thread. Wee bit brief in the OP, what`s the question???
you ken yer man in gladiator [ he touched me ] long b4 jimmy saville ]
yes quotations
.


they walled us in remember that they walled us in the jocks and the irish are joined at the hip .

when i am asked are you a [tim ] celtic or a prody [ protestant ] .

i reply that my KIN have been aruond a lot longer ???????? .

i'm on the planet for a good time not a long time a.t./s PARTY


AND THATS ALL I GOT TO SAY ON THAT
edit on 19/10/13 by geobro because: (no reason given)


Geobro you for real??????

Why are you bringing convicted peadophiles into this?????? And whats Celtic or Protestant got to do with it????

Yees ken aye?? away yea tea france ya numpty. TAL.




Oh geobro i hope your not a xenophobic, racist right wing hun????
edit on 19-10-2013 by fenian8 because: (no reason given)
edit on 19-10-2013 by fenian8 because: yer mans talking shiyte



posted on Oct, 20 2013 @ 12:19 AM
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fenian8

FreeMason
Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.


Am not really getting the point of this thread. Wee bit brief in the OP, what`s the question???


I was writing from my phone while speed reading the book.

I wanted it to be a broad topic not limited to my main focus of Christianity, which I wanted to show just how observant of the world Christians are/were, because people think that they were some flat earthers or something.

But I also wanted to show such an ancient idea of such a profound concept as a "land bridge" lost to the sea.

It's pretty good science....reasoning.



posted on Oct, 20 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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geobro
if it was not for the irish the name of jesus would have all but have vanished from history at one stage


If only they'd have kept their mouths shut.



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 12:03 AM
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FreeMason
Reading from the book The Origins of the Irish.

The monk Augustinus Hibernicus thought of the idea of aa land bridge when attempting to explain how animals got to Ireland.


He wasn't far off. It was an ice sheet though not a land bridge. Not bad though for being almost 1400 years ago.



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by DPrice
 


I agree.

Hundreds of ancient Irish books were burned by the likes of St Patrick and others like him, all in the name of Christianity.

True Irish history destroyed because it was deemed evil.



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 04:16 PM
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Lady_Tuatha
reply to post by DPrice
 


I agree.

Hundreds of ancient Irish books were burned by the likes of St Patrick and others like him, all in the name of Christianity.

True Irish history destroyed because it was deemed evil.


Bull crap, nice try tho...

Because of the Irish Dark Ages immediately preceding the introduction of Christianity there really wasn't any literature to burn.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, Irish history really doesn't begin until the introduction of Christianity about 400AD, because before that Ireland was nearly wiped out by this great Dark Age of theirs.
edit on 21-10-2013 by FreeMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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FreeMason

Lady_Tuatha
reply to post by DPrice
 


I agree.

Hundreds of ancient Irish books were burned by the likes of St Patrick and others like him, all in the name of Christianity.

True Irish history destroyed because it was deemed evil.


Bull crap, nice try tho...

Because of the Irish Dark Ages immediately preceding the introduction of Christianity there really wasn't any literature to burn.

en.wikipedia.org...(400%E2%80%93800)
edit on 21-10-2013 by FreeMason because: (no reason given)



From the link you provided...


. Irish scholars excelled in the study of Latin learning and Christian theology in the monasteries that flourished shortly thereafter. Missionaries from Ireland to England and Continental Europe spread news of the flowering of learning, and scholars from other nations came to Irish monasteries. The excellence and isolation of these monasteries helped preserve Latin learning during the Early Middle Ages. The period of Insular art, mainly in the fields of illuminated manuscripts, metalworking, and sculpture flourished and produced such treasures as the Book of Kells, the Ardagh Chalice, and the many carved stone crosses that dot the island. Insular style was to be a crucial ingredient in the formation of the Romanesque and Gothic styles throughout Western Europe. Sites dating to this period include clochans, ringforts and promontory forts.


This is a reference to the same period you are discussing in your OP. While the mid 6th century plagues did have a burdensome effect on Irish learning, the isolation of the island made it an excellent repository of earlier works translated into Latin for future generations. It was a combination of these epidemics along with Viking incursions and then later, Norman invasions that lead to the loss of a great deal of Irelands history as they burned and ransacked the Monasteries that held such knowledge. While the Vikings may have been Pagans, ther burning of monasteries was prudent on thier end not political whereas ther Catholic Normans were trying to wipe out as much indigenous thought as possible.




Francis John Byrne describes the effect of the epidemics which occurred during this era: The plagues of the 660s and the 680s had a traumatic effect on Irish society. The golden age of the saints was over, together with the generation of kings who could fire a saga-writer's imagination. The literary tradition looks back to the reign of the sons of Aed Slaine (Diarmait and Blathmac, who died in 665) as to the end of an era. Antiquaries, brehons, genealogiests and hagiographers, felt the need to collect ancient traditions before they were totally forgotten. Many were in fact swallowed by oblivion; when we examine the writing of Tirechan we encounter obscure references to tribes which are quite unknown to the later genealogical tradition. The laws describe a tribal society that was obsolescent, and the meaning and use of the word moccu[16] dies out with archaic Old Irish at the beginning of the new century.[17]



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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peter vlar

FreeMason

Lady_Tuatha
reply to post by DPrice
 


I agree.

Hundreds of ancient Irish books were burned by the likes of St Patrick and others like him, all in the name of Christianity.

True Irish history destroyed because it was deemed evil.


Bull crap, nice try tho...

Because of the Irish Dark Ages immediately preceding the introduction of Christianity there really wasn't any literature to burn.

en.wikipedia.org...(400%E2%80%93800)
edit on 21-10-2013 by FreeMason because: (no reason given)



From the link you provided...


. Irish scholars excelled in the study of Latin learning and Christian theology in the monasteries that flourished shortly thereafter. Missionaries from Ireland to England and Continental Europe spread news of the flowering of learning, and scholars from other nations came to Irish monasteries. The excellence and isolation of these monasteries helped preserve Latin learning during the Early Middle Ages. The period of Insular art, mainly in the fields of illuminated manuscripts, metalworking, and sculpture flourished and produced such treasures as the Book of Kells, the Ardagh Chalice, and the many carved stone crosses that dot the island. Insular style was to be a crucial ingredient in the formation of the Romanesque and Gothic styles throughout Western Europe. Sites dating to this period include clochans, ringforts and promontory forts.


This is a reference to the same period you are discussing in your OP. While the mid 6th century plagues did have a burdensome effect on Irish learning, the isolation of the island made it an excellent repository of earlier works translated into Latin for future generations. It was a combination of these epidemics along with Viking incursions and then later, Norman invasions that lead to the loss of a great deal of Irelands history as they burned and ransacked the Monasteries that held such knowledge. While the Vikings may have been Pagans, ther burning of monasteries was prudent on thier end not political whereas ther Catholic Normans were trying to wipe out as much indigenous thought as possible.




Francis John Byrne describes the effect of the epidemics which occurred during this era: The plagues of the 660s and the 680s had a traumatic effect on Irish society. The golden age of the saints was over, together with the generation of kings who could fire a saga-writer's imagination. The literary tradition looks back to the reign of the sons of Aed Slaine (Diarmait and Blathmac, who died in 665) as to the end of an era. Antiquaries, brehons, genealogiests and hagiographers, felt the need to collect ancient traditions before they were totally forgotten. Many were in fact swallowed by oblivion; when we examine the writing of Tirechan we encounter obscure references to tribes which are quite unknown to the later genealogical tradition. The laws describe a tribal society that was obsolescent, and the meaning and use of the word moccu[16] dies out with archaic Old Irish at the beginning of the new century.[17]


I'm sorry, you talk about the Catholic Normans as if the Irish were NOT Catholic?

And the Vikings were not "political"? Are you serious? They purposefully targeted Christian churches because they were anti-Christian.

If you read about the Hiberno-Norman conquest what they did to the locals was no different there in Ireland than what they did to the Angles in England or elserwhere in the British Isles. They weren't Christians destroying non-Christian writings in a fit of religious fervor.

They were smart Normans, destroying indigenous culture in efforts to secure their stranglehold over the country.

And in Ireland the Hiberno-Normans never controlled more than 50% of the Island so the idea that they destroyed all the precious Irish heirlooms is pure poppy-cock anyway. Invented by some anti-Christian scholar who probably knew nothing of Irish history when he invented the idea in the late 1800s. If that is even the case because reading what you quoted I don't see any real evidence of some massive successful book burning destroying ancient Irish history.



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by FreeMason
 


I was never trying to imply that the Irish weren't Catholic. However, the difference between Irish Catholics and other European Catholics was the preservation of "pagan" writings. I disagree with the Vikings being as anti christian as you claim. It was a pragmatic thing to kill off everyone and burn monasteries. The Vikings simply enjoyed a little raping and pillaging. It wasn't an anti-christian thing. The king of Sweden had allowed christian missionaries to proselytize there. There were Vikings who were anti christian and many others who were neutral and other still who converted over the centuries. Their reign of terror had more to do with striking fear into people to acquire more plunder.

just to add... while the Normans never fully occupied the island, the did occupy much of the South, East and North East where a great deal of the Monasteries happened to be located.And unfortunately with Monasteries come chapels and villages. This map is from a few hundred years later than the period we are discussing but it illustrates the point none the less. Maybe it would be a better statement to say that "Some Catholics were eager to destroy Irish history" as opposed to just Catholics.
edit on 21-10-2013 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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peter vlar
reply to post by FreeMason
 


I was never trying to imply that the Irish weren't Catholic. However, the difference between Irish Catholics and other European Catholics was the preservation of "pagan" writings. I disagree with the Vikings being as anti christian as you claim. It was a pragmatic thing to kill off everyone and burn monasteries. The Vikings simply enjoyed a little raping and pillaging. It wasn't an anti-christian thing. The king of Sweden had allowed christian missionaries to proselytize there. There were Vikings who were anti christian and many others who were neutral and other still who converted over the centuries. Their reign of terror had more to do with striking fear into people to acquire more plunder.

It is a mystery for debate why the Vikings specifically targeted monasteries but since the Vikings liked a good fight I don't agree with the side that says they were merely easy targets to plunder.

As for pagan writings, I really doubt the Irish are the only ones, just look at the French mythic stories all of them are rooted in their Gaullic ancestry. It's not exactly easy to preserve anything in those ancient times, the only thing easy to preserve is the one thing everyone was making copies of everywhere.

One fire in one building might wipe out the entire history of a nation...you can't blame that on Christianity. It's just bad luck. Scholars 100 years ago blamed it on Christians.

Look at the Library of Alexandria, blamed on Christians, but it survived until the late 600s, was then blamed on Muslims, and now is thought to have just burned down by bad luck.

Wiping out not everything, because a lot of its manuscripts exist in the Vatican, but certainly a major set-back!





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