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Car bomb near Egypt army intelligence building wounds six

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posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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The war against terrorism is alive and well in the Middle East, and recent attacks from Islamist militants upset over the removal and outlaw of the Muslim Brotherhood has continued it's attack on Egyptian security forces.

english.ahram.org.eg...



At least five soldiers and a man whose occupation is yet to be revealed were wounded on Saturday when a car bomb exploded near an army intelligence building in Ismailia, northeast of Cairo, security sources and state media said.
The sources said another undetonated car bomb was found while security personnel were sweeping the area. The force of the blast caused part of the military intelligence building's wall to collapse, one of the sources said.

Army recruit Abdel-Salam El-Sayed, 24, suffered a 3-cm wound to the head, while Mohamed Saber, a 21-year-old soldier, sustained a back injury and a 6-cm wound to the head.

Senior Warrant Officer Ahmed El-Shafei, 40, suffered a 4-cm wound to the head. All three were rushed to the Military Galaa Hospital, according to Al-Ahram's Arabic website.

Sergeant Ahmed Ibrahim, 32, was wounded in the eye and was taken to the Public Hospital, while 20-year-old Abdel-Ghani Mostafa sustained a 2-cm wound to the neck. The latter was treated at the scene.

Abdel Kader Ahmed, a 58-year-old man who lives in the area, is in a coma, Al-Ahram reported. He suffered injuries to the torso and abdominal area and is now in the University Hospital.


www.reuters.com...



No group has claimed responsibility, but al Qaeda-linked Islamist militants in the largely lawless Sinai region have stepped up attacks on soldiers and police since the army toppled Islamist President Mohamed Mursi in July. The militants have on occasion extended their campaign into major cities.

Military spokesman Ahmed Ali said in a statement the bombing was "a continuation of the wave of cowardly terrorist attacks", by groups he described as promoting strife.

Security personnel searching the area found another car bomb, which had not gone off, state media and security sources said. Heavy smoke could be seen rising from a building nearby.

The force of the blast caused part of the military intelligence building's outer wall to collapse.

Some security sources said the bomb was planted in a car belonging to a doctor who lived in a nearby building.


Terrorists are having a field day in the Middle East causing one wave of death and destruction after another. Iraq, Syria, Libya, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and more all report terrorists attacks weekly, some almost daily. Is this what America and the West envisioned when they brought the war to the Middle East? From here it looks like a complete failure on their part but this all may be apart of their plan. Either we have complete incompetent fools in charge or they know exactly what they're doing.
edit on 19-10-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)
edit on 19-10-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by Swills
 


Nah. These are Egyptians struggling to throw off the yoke of their oppressive government. Labeling them Morsi-ists degrades them to terrorist status. They been struggling for freedom since they overthrew Mubarak.

The coup that deposed Morsi, run by the Military (the same US backed and funded Military) kidnapped him and "replaced" him with a puppet judge from Mubarak's cabinet. Without an election I might add.

So the people revolted again. I heard on RT today that there were two devices, one failed to explode.

These aren't "Middle Eastern Terrorists". The Egyptian people are learning to fight back.



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


So these aren't your run of the mill terrorists, but rather, Egyptian people, civilians, are attacking their own security forces?

I don't agree. The Egyptians supported the removal of the MB and, imo, are not attacking the security forces. The terrorists however have been and will continue to attack Egyptian security forces.

Also,
Israel Expresses Dismay at Cutback of U.S. Aid to Egypt



JERUSALEM — Officials and experts in Israel responded on Wednesday with a mixture of disappointment and alarm to the news that the United States planned to reduce its military aid to Egypt in response to this summer’s brutal crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and the continuing violence it has spawned.
edit on 19-10-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by Swills
 

You used "Egyptian Security Forces" three times in your post. The military are the ones doing the repression now. Calling them "security forces" makes them sound more benign. I don't want to say sowing disinformation, but look at the term.

Like "intervention" in place of invasion.

The call to intervene in Iraq, Libya and Syria is about the bad leadership oppressing its people right? Have you asked yourself why this same call is not being made about Egypt... at all?

Where is the "Humanitarian Aid" (weapons) shipments across borders to the brave rebels in Egypt? Where is the UN mandate for a no fly zone and NATO training and arming of cadres in nearby countries?

How come US and NATO jets are not bombing the Egyptian Military into dust like in so many other Middle Eastern countries?



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


By security forces I'm lumping in the Egyptian military AND police because both have been attacked by known terrorist forces and continue to be attacked.

Yes, every Western intervention in the ME has been a complete disaster, but like I said, it all may just be going according to plan for some. Are you now saying the West should send arms and non lethal aid to the Egyptian people themselves to fight the Egyptian security forces?

Your view and my view of the situation in Egypt are polar opposites.



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Swills
 




By security forces I'm lumping in the Egyptian military AND police because both have been attacked by known terrorist forces and continue to be attacked.

Imagine the report that Occupy was fired upon by 'Security Forces" and the photos and videos show tanks and soldiers armed with rifles? Thousands are dead.


Are you now saying the West should send arms and non lethal aid to the Egyptian people themselves to fight the Egyptian security forces?

I am not. I was making the point that this scenario in Egypt is exactly why we went to war in other countries. "They're killing their people! They're killing their people!" It was enough before, but not in Egypt?


Your view and my view of the situation in Egypt are polar opposites.

One of us is misled by the media. Do you hold that the Egyptian military is justified in opening fire upon protesting citizens after they (the military) kidnapped a duly elected president? Using that above occupy scenario what do you think the response of people wold be here if that happened in the US?

If we disagree it is on the definition of a "democracy". The rules are different for foreigners, I guess?



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


You make it sound like it's the Egyptian people vs the Egyptian security forces/Gov't but it's not that simple. Did the security forces fire upon any one of the millions upon millions of anti MB/Morsi protesters? Did the security forces fire upon the hundreds/thousands of pro MB/Morsi supporters? The military's coup came in direct reaction to the millions of protesters who have been protesting the MB/Morsi since they took office.

The pro MB supporters were barricading themselves in the streets, creating tent cities, but more importantly were attacking Eygptian security forces. Clashes waged on between the Islamist militants/pro MB supporters and the security forces long before they were warned to leave the camp/barricades. They were given at least 2 weeks notice to vacate. The anti MB Egyptians were not clashing with security forces and were not burning down Christian Coptic churches/schools while parading nuns down the streets of Cairo.

Are you pro Muslim Brotherhood or are you just really mad the security forces killed protesters?
edit on 19-10-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Swills
 


Are you pro Muslim Brotherhood or are you just really mad the security forces killed protesters?

As long as you insist on using negative or misleading stereotypes for the players involved , there isn't much room for continued conversation.

Yes, its upsetting whenever a government guns down its own people. You label people "Morsi's", "Muslims" and "Brotherhoods" and at the same time whatever authority does the killing are just "security". You even use the same derogatory name calling on me. This is why there is so much conflict in the world. Brother against brother...

End of line



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Negative and misleading? Please explain yourself because the facts are there were millions of anti MB protesters that took to the streets and because of these constant and huge protests the military overthrew the MB as a direct result of the will of the people. It's a fact pro MB/terrorists attacked security forces and burned down churches/schools. But do feel free to point out at what it is I'm lying about.




You even use the same derogatory name calling on me.


Same derogatory term? Please show me where I'm calling you names.

I enjoy how you drone about my labeling police and military as security as if that somehow lessens them or the situation somehow. I could write military and police but it's quicker to lump them in as security, but feel free to dwell on this term if you like.
edit on 19-10-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2013 @ 07:07 AM
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It's no surprise that this is difficult to discuss. This is a no win situation in the West as the definition of a coup d'état by the military over a democratically elected leader is problematic. The misleading approach by the Mohamed Morsi election campaign that disguised their real intentions that were to establish an Islamic Caliphate to basically enslave the people. A planned wave of terror to eliminate any opposition to the Caliphate was the most frightening prospect for policy makers in Washington.

It's hard to fault the indecision here as through out history it is difficult to find a situation in which a coup was instigated, not by what an administration had done-but what they might do in the future.





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