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how would a war in North Korea be fought?

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posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 09:51 AM
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Actually, there's a very good (though VERY DRY) book by Humphrey Hawksley, called "Dragon Strike". It's actually a modern-day analysis of how a war between China and the U.S. would go, in the form of a novel...a very...very...dry, informative novel. It gives a very realistic assessment of our HUMINT situation in Asia, the attitudes and resources of eastern Asian countries, who the Power Players are and why, and what sort of tactics could be expected by either side.

Assuming you don't want to read 300-500 pages of the most dull but interesting war, it may be summarized as such...

Despite all the technology we have, the cheap disposable "kilo" class diesel submarine is easily capable of dodging most methods of detection. A short range nuke would likely be parked, somewhere on the ocean floor west of California, and it would be used as a bargaining chip in order to reach some sort of accord. Most likely, China would "take care" of North Korea for us, and the French would immediately come to the aid of South Korea, as they have a large vested interest there. If suddenly people started showing off their nukes to intimidate each other, Japan would probably perform a nuclear test, deep underground, where it would not do any damage, or technically break any laws, but would announce to China that it will not simply lay down and surrender.

Regardless of supposition, the fact remains this: Any War, ever again, involving a country in east-Asia, both sides will have to deal with China, and hopefully on a very civil basis.




posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by netscape
Kim knows he has nothing to lose once war starts. it will be end of NK. so he won't mind using nukes. What if NK nukes SK / Japan. US may wipe out NK from map but does China Russia wants this?


Are there strategy for US or other country to have a preemptive strike on NK if they discover NK is about to attack? Because if Kim does not mind using nukes or bambard SK civilians, the best option is probably destroying its nuclear and artillery capability first rather than just retaliate after NK attacks.

And maybe even SK does not want US to wipe out NK, if you mean destroying everything in NK. Anyone here from South Korea?


[edit on 30-11-2004 by twchang]

[edit on 30-11-2004 by twchang]



posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Hawkssss
Seoul is within the shooting range of close to 10,000 N. Korean guns.

[edit on 29-11-2004 by Hawkssss]


Oh, I see, and these guns are protected by state of the art SAMs that will take down our Harrier's, F-22's, F-117's, and B-2's? North Korea's AF consist of a Cessna with a WWII style gattling gun and a bomb that can be dropped when the pilot opens the door and lets it go. As others have stated, air superiority would be key in this situation. Those guns shall be worthless when a host of bombs are dropped on to them.



posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by Frosty


Oh, I see, and these guns are protected by state of the art SAMs that will take down our Harrier's, F-22's, F-117's, and B-2's? North Korea's AF consist of a Cessna with a WWII style gattling gun and a bomb that can be dropped when the pilot opens the door and lets it go. As others have stated, air superiority would be key in this situation. Those guns shall be worthless when a host of bombs are dropped on to them.

yes im sure that with americas tech they can well out do a well hidden force, yes cough vietnam cough!
funny you see the thing is SAMs can pick up any plane F22 or B2. the RN tracked a B2 before.



posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by Frosty
North Korea's AF consist of a Cessna with a WWII style gattling gun and a bomb that can be dropped when the pilot opens the door and lets it go. As others have stated, air superiority would be key in this situation. Those guns shall be worthless when a host of bombs are dropped on to them.


Wrong. They got MiG, and even Su's

www.globalsecurity.org...



posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 11:21 AM
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To start the war there would probably be lots of well executed sabotage attempts by North Korean agents. Lots of bombs being set off in government facilities and military bases. Then there would probably be the larges artillery bombardment the world has ever seen. Most South Korean cities within range would be reduced to nothing. NK troops, tanks would pour across the boarder and push back US and South Korean forces quite a bit. Then their logistical systems would fail and the attack would stall from lack of fuel, water, and parts. This is when more US units start landing in Korea and pushing the NK army back.

Of course NK needs complete surprise for this to work.



posted on Jul, 6 2005 @ 07:14 PM
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Here is a link on NKs air force, source

looks to me like they depend to much on russia, I don't think any of those missiles have been made by them. And I know all the aircraft are Russian.



posted on Aug, 12 2005 @ 04:10 PM
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12/18/2002 - OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea (AFPN) -- Members of the 353rd Special Operations Group, Kadena Air Base, Japan, joined with members of South Korea's Special Warfare Command here recently to plan the critical first few days of a potential conflict on the Korean Peninsula.

For two weeks, planners, flight crews and intelligence experts reviewed everything from flight routes and aircraft configurations to air refueling tracks and army ground movements.

This combined planning operation was unique, because for the first time U.S. special operators flew to Korean army special forces brigades to plan wartime missions. Additionally, the planning included the expertise of several specialists and aircrew members who would actually carry out the wartime assignment.

Teams developed and reviewed each of the missions they would perform in the event of a major crisis. Aircrews who fly the MC-130H Combat Talon II, the MC-130P Combat Shadow and the U.S. Army's MH-47 Chinook worked with their Korean counterparts and Korean army special forces to create feasible designs.

"Each year the operations plan changes slightly," said Maj. Bae Gyung-Guen. "Korea's Special Warfare Command wants to make sure there are no misunderstandings between the aircrews and jumpers. That's the greatest value of this operation."



Planning joint operations among different services, a challenge inherent to all special operations, becomes complicated in an environment involving forces from two countries and multiple services, said Maj. Mike Semenov, 1st SOS, who served as mission commander. Fortunately, according to Semenov, both U.S. and Korean special operators overcame the challenges of language and culture.

"This operation is an excellent vehicle for the exchange of ideas and allows both sides to better understand how each other does business," he said. "There's no substitute for familiarity and that responsiveness remains the cornerstone of our success.
source


Wow this just shows how prepared we are, and how tense situations are in Korea. Intresting though, I like that concept. Reminds me of the SF team concept Richard Marcinko was talking about, in least in some ways. If you wonder what he was talking about, it was knowing each others moves, because you know each other so well. Same with this to coordinate offensive, and defensive missions you have to be familair with how a countries service or even specific group operates.



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