31 in Florida Infected by Bacteria in Salt Water ...! More reports of vibrio vulnificus

page: 1
7

log in

join

posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 12:33 AM
link   
www.nbcmiami.com...

The diagnosis: vibrio vulnificus, an infection caused by a bacteria found in warm salt water. It's in the same family of bacterium that causes cholera. So far this year, 31 people across Florida have been infected by the severe strain of vibrio, and 10 have died.




Patty Konietzky thought the small purple lesion on her husband's ankle was a spider bite. But when the lesion quickly spread across his body like a constellation, she knew something wasn't right.


After a trip to the hospital and a day and a half later, Konietzky's 59-year-old husband was dead.


State health officials say there are two ways to contract the disease: by eating raw, tainted shellfish — usually oysters — or when an open wound comes in contact with bacteria in warm seawater.


Below was the first thread I did on this bacteria which is antibiotic resistant. Stay safe and aware of your body it has not gone away.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.cnn.com...




posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 12:37 AM
link   
reply to post by 727Sky
 


Good to know Sky, thanks for alerting us.



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 12:51 AM
link   
Scratch that. Alien invasion makes more sense.



I assume this will be gone by winter? How warm does the water in florida get in the later months?
edit on 12-10-2013 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-10-2013 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 01:10 AM
link   
hmmm certainly interesting timing for this kind of a thing to come out of the woodwork.....10 deaths I wonder how many this virus has killed in the past years?



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 01:15 AM
link   
reply to post by 727Sky
 


maybe this has something to do with the deepwater horizon oil spill or the fukushima thing....

maybe mother nature is pissed off at the human virus.



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 02:15 AM
link   

justreleased
reply to post by 727Sky
 


maybe this has something to do with the deepwater horizon oil spill or the fukushima thing....

maybe mother nature is pissed off at the human virus.


Highly doubtful, it's an ever-present bacteria that lives in the aquatic environment & the cases thus far aren't out of the norm. You're probably more liable to die from a random oyster harboring this than a dip in the water, and in either situation, nearly only if you're immuno-compromised already. In a healthy person, if you have any ill-effects from contact with it at all, you'll recover. It's like the odds for the brain amoeba - - always out there, but rare to die from.

Remove the knickers from the caverns of the nether regions. Awareness is fine, but panic over something this normal in it's rarity is unwise. Kind of like people freaking out over the crud they didn't know was growing in their kitchen sink. Doesn't generally bother, sicken or kill anyone much until they read about it & go into overdrive



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 08:21 AM
link   

Nyiah

justreleased
reply to post by 727Sky
 


maybe this has something to do with the deepwater horizon oil spill or the fukushima thing....

maybe mother nature is pissed off at the human virus.


Highly doubtful, it's an ever-present bacteria that lives in the aquatic environment & the cases thus far aren't out of the norm. You're probably more liable to die from a random oyster harboring this than a dip in the water, and in either situation, nearly only if you're immuno-compromised already. In a healthy person, if you have any ill-effects from contact with it at all, you'll recover. It's like the odds for the brain amoeba - - always out there, but rare to die from.

Remove the knickers from the caverns of the nether regions. Awareness is fine, but panic over something this normal in it's rarity is unwise. Kind of like people freaking out over the crud they didn't know was growing in their kitchen sink. Doesn't generally bother, sicken or kill anyone much until they read about it & go into overdrive


Hahahaha very well written and reasoned Nyiah.. although even I have to admit I do not look at crossing or a fun frolic in the water like I used to... I am surprised I survived my youth, Raw Oysters and all. ! I did quit the Oysters back in the 70s after several people got sick in Virginia and New Orleans one year.. Wasn't hard for me to do it for it was more of a social eating thing. What has surprised me about some of these cases is the antibiotic resistance the bugs/bacteria exhibit .



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 08:28 AM
link   
All these reports have been in the US, and southern at that (warmer water right now). Have there been any reports in other countries?



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 08:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Merlynn
 


CDC report www.cdc.gov...

V. vulnificus is a rare cause of disease, but it is also underreported. Between 1988 and 2006, CDC received reports of more than 900 V. vulnificus infections from the Gulf Coast states, where most cases occur. Before 2007, there was no national surveillance system for V. vulnificus, but CDC collaborated with the states of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, and Mississippi to monitor the number of cases of V. vulnificus infection in the Gulf Coast region. In 2007, infections caused by V. vulnificus and other Vibrio species became nationally notifiable.




With a nearly 50-percent mortality rate, Vibrio vulnificus is the most deadly foodborne pathogen in the world, according to University of North Carolina at Charlotte Biology Professor Jim Oliver. And instances of infection in the U.S., however rare, are rapidly rising.



While infections from either of the pathogens are still rare compared with, say, Salmonella and Campylobacter, the incidence rate grew faster than any of the other five microbes tracked in the Centers for Disease Control’s 2012 Food Safety Progress Report. The vulnificus strain is responsible for 95 percent of seafood-related illness fatalities in the U.S., according to a 2013 study by Oliver and Joanna Nowakowska. Another Vibrio strain, parahaemolyticus, is milder, causing diarrhea, nausea, fever and chills, according to CDC.



Several studies have linked Vibrio’s quick growth rate with rising ocean temperatures, a critical condition favorable to the saltwater-based bacterium. Instances of Vibrio have started showing up in colder places where they were largely unheard-of before.



“Most notably, they’ve been [seeing cases] in places like the Baltic and Germany,” Oliver said.

That is the thing about a Bacteria if given a change it will evolve and spread to places it was not known for.
www.foodsafetynews.com...



posted on Oct, 12 2013 @ 10:15 AM
link   
here is a report about a guy that caught it in 2005, he lives in the county next to me. see what it did to his nose, hands, and feet

One survivor's story after Vibrio Vulnificus Read More at: www.weartv.com...

i think there is much more to be aware of than they are letting on to.
all the sources i've read say that 1/3 of the cases turn out to be fatal. i guess the cdc is talking about the one that catch it through the blood stream when they say 50%.

oysters and other shell fish, how many different shell fish are there. here are some i know clams, oysters, mussels and scallops. would shrimp, crab, lobster and other crustaceans be considered shellfish.



edit on 12-10-2013 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)





new topics
top topics
 
7

log in

join


Haters, Bigots, Partisan Trolls, Propaganda Hacks, Racists, and LOL-tards: Time To Move On.
read more: Community Announcement re: Decorum