Five Off-Duty Police Officers Involved in NYC Motorcycle Gang Road Rage Incident

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posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 08:37 AM
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I would not have imagined that this could be true but, it seems that some of the bikers involved in the road rage incident in NYC were off-duty police officers. At least three officers are known about so far but I have heard five and possibly even more, one is a sergeant and one is actually internal affairs.

The details are somewhat sketchy so far but, there is the obvious question as to why they did not reveal themselves immediately and stop the incident from progressing and then, apparently having claimed either fear of personal harm or some as yet undefined investigative interest in remaining undercover, continued to stay quiet for days after the incident.

Considering that a mother and child were in mortal danger, I can say that there can be no excuse for not doing everything in their power to intervene.


Off-duty police officers part of group involved in NYC motorcycle road rage incident



At least three off-duty police officers say they were part of a motorcycle group that was involved in a violent assault of an SUV driver last weekend in New York City.

One of them, a detective who works undercover, even saw the attack. But apparently fearful of revealing his identity, he did not intervene. The undercover detective waited several days before coming forward. It's unclear if the other two off-duty officers also witnessed the beating.

They will all be stripped of their guns and badges and have been placed on desk duty, pending an investigation.



Sorting through the officers' stories is the next step in this investigation, Miller added. "We know of one (officer) who was there at the initial beating, but these other officers, one of the ones that's come forward says after the guy got run over by the SUV, 'I wasn't there for the rest of it.' ... Here's the problem they're going to face, which is whatever they did or didn't do that day is one issue, but not coming forward right away actually could rise to official misconduct for hindering an investigation once they were aware of it and that's a potential criminal charge."

The officers, Miller said, are going to be placed on modified assignments after their stories are weighed. "They could be suspended. This could be grounds for dismissal, especially if the -- this is the D.A.'s call. If the district attorney looks at their conduct and says that rises to official misconduct, 'Everybody knew this investigation was going forward, we needed this information and these guys didn't step forward as law enforcement officers' -- that could be violation of law."



Police arrested two of the alleged assailants over the weekend, and more arrests could be on the way. Police say the man seen pulling the Range Rover's door open is 35-year-old Robert Sims, of Brooklyn. And they say the man who later slammed his helmet against the driver's side window is Reginald Chance, 37, also from Brooklyn. Chance, CBS News has learned, already has 21 prior arrests on his record, including robbery and drug charges.

Chance's lawyer Gregory Watts says his client overreacted and broke the window, but denied taking part in the beating. He said, "If you look at the video, you will see my client immediately after smashing the window, returning to his bicycle. And there are still photographs in the possession of the district attorney that will show you that he's not physically present."



Both Chance and Sims have been charged with gang assault and other felonies. Sims, according to court documents, stomped on the head and body of the SUV driver, Alexian Lien.

An unknown attacker tried to yank his wife and 2-year-old daughter out of the vehicle.

Witness Sergio Consuegra said, "I heard a lot of people screaming, telling the man -- 'No not the woman! There's a child! There's a child! Not with the child!'"



Consuegra said he was shocked to hear police officers were on the scene and did nothing. He called the situation "like unbelievable." He added, "It made me angry, it made me sad, yeah, that knowing that it could have been avoided."

This weekend, police released pictures of two more persons of interest. They also continue to scour the video for clues about the other assailants.

As for the motorcyclist who took the video, Kevin Bresloff -- his attorney says he is cooperating with police and is not considered a suspect.
edit on 8-10-2013 by greencmp because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 08:50 AM
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I think it depends entirely on what the undercover was doing, to think about it. If that was a modern day Donnie Brasco in terms of what he was involved with for not wanting to blow who he was so publicly, then I could well understand the greater good thing going here.

I'd ask even him though, how this ever went that far? Surely even the undercover with something big to lose, could have broken off from the group before the assault began and phoned a 911? That wouldn't have blown anything...right? The others don't sound like they had even that (admittedly weak) excuse for not being cops vs. members of a street mob.


Employment standards a bit..ahem..low at the NYPD? I get that there are almost 35,000 of them ...but the bad apple analogy is getting pretty thin here. It's several whole trees by the look of things....turning to the whole orchard! Headlines are getting wayy too common with this sort of thing.




posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 09:08 AM
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I know ex-cops who ride with a group of friends, some of whom are cops. If they see an injustice they will respond in a way that they believe is right. The guy in the SUV should have slowed to avoid the accident in this case and his actions after the accident were not justifiable. You don't run over someone helping someone else even if you are scared.

I don't blame the police officers for not doing anything. The excessive beating of the driver of the SUV was uncalled for though. People judge people inappropriately all the time, I do not think that these bikers would have done this if the situation was different, after all, some of their companions were cops and they were jeopardising the group's integrity. I know my friends who were cops would have yanked that guy out of the car if he was trying to escape, using appropriate force to stop him from fleeing. That is not bad. The cops riding with this group should have taken charge and stopped the beating but allowed them to use appropriate force to detain the driver of the suv. Things just got out of hand. You can't control people easily when they get pissed off a lot of time.

So there was fault on both sides, I will let the judicial system work this out. I just comment to show I understand both sides. The SUV driver was scared, but his fear made things so much worse.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 09:10 AM
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Once you join the force, you can commit whatever crime, and be persecuted AND still get away with it(with pay).



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 09:13 AM
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rickymouse
I know ex-cops who ride with a group of friends, some of whom are cops. If they see an injustice they will respond in a way that they believe is right. The guy in the SUV should have slowed to avoid the accident in this case and his actions after the accident were not justifiable. You don't run over someone helping someone else even if you are scared.

I don't blame the police officers for not doing anything. The excessive beating of the driver of the SUV was uncalled for though. People judge people inappropriately all the time, I do not think that these bikers would have done this if the situation was different, after all, some of their companions were cops and they were jeopardising the group's integrity. I know my friends who were cops would have yanked that guy out of the car if he was trying to escape, using appropriate force to stop him from fleeing. That is not bad. The cops riding with this group should have taken charge and stopped the beating but allowed them to use appropriate force to detain the driver of the suv. Things just got out of hand. You can't control people easily when they get pissed off a lot of time.

So there was fault on both sides, I will let the judicial system work this out. I just comment to show I understand both sides. The SUV driver was scared, but his fear made things so much worse.

I appreciate your honesty, it further confirms my suspicions about the mindset of gangs in general.

I simply cannot abide anyone putting their own safety before that of a mother and child be they a law abiding citizen, a gang member or an off-duty police officer.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 


You are right, gang mindset is not limited to gangs of hoods. A couple of people can turn a peaceful demonstration into a riot. If they know how to steer this mindset.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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luciddream
Once you join the force, you can commit whatever crime, and be persecuted AND still get away with it(with pay).

That does seem to be the case, how is it possible that these officers could not be incarcerated until an investigation can absolve them of any crime much less consider them worthy of continued employment?



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 10:44 AM
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Wrabbit2000
I think it depends entirely on what the undercover was doing, to think about it. If that was a modern day Donnie Brasco in terms of what he was involved with for not wanting to blow who he was so publicly, then I could well understand the greater good thing going here.

I'd ask even him though, how this ever went that far? Surely even the undercover with something big to lose, could have broken off from the group before the assault began and phoned a 911? That wouldn't have blown anything...right? The others don't sound like they had even that (admittedly weak) excuse for not being cops vs. members of a street mob.


Employment standards a bit..ahem..low at the NYPD? I get that there are almost 35,000 of them ...but the bad apple analogy is getting pretty thin here. It's several whole trees by the look of things....turning to the whole orchard! Headlines are getting wayy too common with this sort of thing.


I have tried to tell people that most of them are bad. I know this from experience from the 'right' side of the law, in multiple municipalities.

They aren't all bad, but it is difficult to find good ones. Once you get to know them personally, you see that they have a different mindset and a totally different set of values and it isn't a good set of values.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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butcherguy

Wrabbit2000
I think it depends entirely on what the undercover was doing, to think about it. If that was a modern day Donnie Brasco in terms of what he was involved with for not wanting to blow who he was so publicly, then I could well understand the greater good thing going here.

I'd ask even him though, how this ever went that far? Surely even the undercover with something big to lose, could have broken off from the group before the assault began and phoned a 911? That wouldn't have blown anything...right? The others don't sound like they had even that (admittedly weak) excuse for not being cops vs. members of a street mob.


Employment standards a bit..ahem..low at the NYPD? I get that there are almost 35,000 of them ...but the bad apple analogy is getting pretty thin here. It's several whole trees by the look of things....turning to the whole orchard! Headlines are getting wayy too common with this sort of thing.


I have tried to tell people that most of them are bad. I know this from experience from the 'right' side of the law, in multiple municipalities.

They aren't all bad, but it is difficult to find good ones. Once you get to know them personally, you see that they have a different mindset and a totally different set of values and it isn't a good set of values.

Agreed, it is not that all officers are bad. However, I do hold the good ones responsible for their colleagues bad behavior. After all, the law of the land considers the knowledge of criminal activity without making an attempt to report or prevent it as tantamount to complicity.

You may be interested in this which explores much of this subject:
The NYPD Tapes: A Shocking Story of Cops, Cover-ups, and Courage"
edit on 8-10-2013 by greencmp because: (no reason given)





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