Breaking! Meteor Travelling 114,000MPH Hits Ohio, USA (VIDEO)

page: 2
11
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 02:53 AM
link   
reply to post by cheesy
 

In the upper left? I see one. And I don't see it falling.

People often mistake contrails for meteors.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 03:02 AM
link   
Nifty.
For those interested in the program used to make that nifty rocket video in the first place, look here.
Kerbal Space Program



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 03:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Thorneblood
 


Nice site,thanks...would you like a nice book reference?



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 03:23 AM
link   

Phage
reply to post by cheesy
 

In the upper left? I see one. And I don't see it falling.

People often mistake contrails for meteors.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Tq Mr.Phage for your link..I see it, Tq Once again..



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 04:09 AM
link   
reply to post by cheesy
 


Well... I don't remember who said it, but someone in the government 20-30 years ago said that we would be using terrorists to help promote the elite agenda first, and then asteroids and other space threats second.

It is too coincidental that the news media has decided to focus on asteroids all of a sudden so much. Other than that, is there an increased threat? I'm not sure.

Ha, was there even a terrorist threat? I'm not sure about that, either. I'm not sure how much of it was spin.
edit on 8-10-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 04:44 AM
link   
reply to post by SarnholeOntarable
 


A book reference for what?



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 04:57 AM
link   
51 Km/s? Wow... That little sucker was moving, huh?

Didn't anyone tell that dirty snowball that Ohio treats speeding real seriously? I'll bet they'd send the ticket to someone if they could figure out an address to send to.

Really, that is near the top end of the simulator scales for speeds you can select for something (70 km/s is around the max, I think. Always makes for a big splash into an ocean for a simulation anyway).

Phage, what causes the speed? Just a matter of how directions and angles all came together on this one for what direction everything was going when it intersected?



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 05:11 AM
link   
reply to post by Thorneblood
 


Was kink..of stipulated humor.
here's a good book,Pat Cornwell...Blow Fly
send me a good read.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 06:24 AM
link   
Here are details of an object from ASGARD showing details of the event showing the height, velocity, atmospheric position and speed

time 20130927 4.4058 hours
lat 42 07 49.584 = 42.1304 deg
lon 279 10 03.972 = 279.1678 deg
ht 103.487 b 9.04445 6.64141 18.68764 1.76695
alp 74.173 +/- 3.276 deg
del 52.795 +/- 9.111 deg
v_inf 119.850 +/- 59.284 km/s
v_avg 119.850 +/- 59.284 km/s

a -0.120 +/- 0.182 AU
e 8.990 +/- 12.285
incl 139.524 +/- 12.670 deg
omega 198.391 +/- 6.626 deg
asc_node 184.042 +/- 0.000 deg
v_g 119.124 +/- 59.541 km/s
v_h 95.824 +/- 58.754 km/s
alp_geo 74.048 +/- 3.301 deg
del_geo 52.860 +/- 9.145 deg
q_per 0.956 +/- 0.029 AU
q_aph -1.196 +/- 0.347 AU
lambda 79.138 +/- 2.642 deg
beta 30.032 +/- 9.075 deg
true anom 341.609 +/- 9.075 deg

T_j hyp



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 11:34 AM
link   
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Phage, what causes the speed? Just a matter of how directions and angles all came together on this one for what direction everything was going when it intersected?
If it was cometary in nature, gravity. Mostly. That piece of ice has been falling toward the Sun for a long time, increasing velocity every second. Add Earth's orbital velocity and you get...whoa!


For example, C/2012 S1 will be going 41kps when it's at Earth's orbital distance from the Sun.
edit on 10/8/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 11:56 AM
link   
reply to post by whatnext21
 

That's really cool.

Notice the semi-major axis (a) is a negative value (probably). That indicates that it was a one time visit.
The very high eccentricity (e) indicates a hyperbolic orbit. Also an indication that the tiny comet got really unlucky on its only visit to the inner Solar System. Of course, we were lucky that it was a very tiny comet.


a -0.120 +/- 0.182 AU
e 8.990 +/- 12.285



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 12:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Wow Thanks Phage, I check the Asgard site daily. NASA's All Sky Fireball Network
It is kind of interesting to line up the fireballs with possible comet orbits, but that one takes a lot of time and work.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:05 PM
link   
Video? Not.

Thanks for making me twice as pissed off as I was a minute ago.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 01:16 PM
link   
reply to post by cheesy
 

Could be allusory but the upper left contrail looks really high while moving pretty fast.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 02:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Here is another that just came by today with almost the same orbit summary.

time 20131008 5.0972 hours
lat 37 28 01.308 = 37.4670 deg
lon 275 40 50.952 = 275.6808 deg
ht 96.545 b 9.29569 6.72962 18.10933 5.59549
alp 88.350 +/- 6.487 deg
del 16.957 +/- 13.954 deg
v_inf 80.100 +/- 3.140 km/s
v_avg 80.100 +/- 3.140 km/s

a -1.002 +/- 0.429 AU
e 1.847 +/- 0.354
incl 168.662 +/- 23.898 deg
omega 39.808 +/- 14.512 deg
asc_node 14.894 +/- 0.006 deg
v_g 78.971 +/- 3.171 km/s
v_h 51.582 +/- 3.674 km/s
alp_geo 88.439 +/- 6.549 deg
del_geo 16.806 +/- 14.073 deg
q_per 0.849 +/- 0.104 AU
q_aph -2.854 +/- 0.887 AU
lambda 88.684 +/- 6.312 deg
beta -6.623 +/- 14.072 deg
true anom 320.189 +/- 14.072 deg

T_j hyp



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 02:58 PM
link   

Phage
reply to post by Thorneblood
 

I wouldn't.

But an object on an orbit with a large semi-major axis (well beyond the orbit of Pluto) would be moving very fast at Earth's orbit.


Yes..i'm assuming you mean the Earths orbital speed being factored into the speed estimates of space objects?

The Earth orbital speed is about 110,000km per hour, our rotation is about 1600km per hour, so a comet or meteor travelling towards our orbital path, or in opposition to it, will have a combined speed of the velocity of the Earth and the Space object itself, whatever that speed happens to be.

And if the strike is angled against our rotation direction, that 1600km per hour will also need to be added to the final speed estimates of the meteor or comet.

Similar to a car travelling at 80mph hitting a car travelling in the opposite direction also at 80mph will produce an impact speed of 160mph.

Then theres the speed of our entire Solar system's orbit around the Galactic center...

This also works in reverse too...if the meteor is 'catching the Earth' from behind, the speed and the energy of impact will be much less.



posted on Oct, 9 2013 @ 10:21 AM
link   
reply to post by cheesy
 


Thanks, very interesting!



posted on Oct, 9 2013 @ 10:15 PM
link   

Phage

is this the second event strike Ohio?
back there there is a meteorite fall to earth and burn a house kill 2 elderly couple..Scary time,when Nasa go Off, so Space fence.
No. It's talking about the meteor on September 27th.
www.space.com...

There is no evidence that the meteor hit the ground. In fact, at that speed it is likely that it was a piece of cometary ice which would have quickly broken up upon entering the atmosphere.


Oh Phage....you party pooper!

J/K Love ya Phage





new topics
top topics
 
11
<< 1   >>

log in

join