What would cause a lightbulb to do this?

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posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 04:51 PM
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If the lamp has been working fine I would not rewire it if it passes a visual inspection of any "exposed" wiring - including the cord and cord cap (plug). If the wiring is faulty generally either the circuit breaker/fuse box would trip or you would see the bulb occasionally flicker or dim. If it's old it probably is not grounded/earthed which can be problematic if there is a problem with a current carrying conductor touching a metal portion of the lamp - if you rewire it yourself you take a chance of causing a problem where there was not one to begin with. If you ever do feel a small amount of current when operating the lamp reverse the plug in the outlet. If not do nothing to the plug.

Wiring problems would be open circuit - light would not work, frayed or broken wire - lamp would be dim or metallic body of lamp could possibly be energized, and dead short - circuit breaker would trip ( or fuse would open). Something else you could test would be to "feel" the electrical cord and try to determine if it feels hot or warm to the touch - you should not be able to feel heat (perhaps a very slight amount).

An electrical surge caused by the utility company would probably just burn out the filiment in the lamp unless it was a LARGE surge and then you would have a lot of things go "pop", not just that bulb.

My guess is there was a flaw in the glass bulb and heat eventually weakened the flaw to the point it finally broke. Not common, but not unheard of either.

Usually best to stick with 60 watt bulbs in any lighting fixture (x the number of sockets provided) unless you have seen a ul sticker indicating the luminaire has been designed to accomodate a higher wattage lamp.
edit on 10/6/2013 by FrenchOsage because: duh moment




posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


I would get my electric checked asap if I were you. Hopefully it wasn't a mercury bulb!

Here's a link for some known causes.
What causes a light bulb to explode
edit on 6-10-2013 by Staroth because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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xDeadcowx
I am no expert, but my first instinct was that there was some kind of imperfection in the glass. Glass is very susceptible to changes in temperature and just like a small crack in a car's windshield, those tiny cracks will grow over time with the slightest amount of pressure.

Turning the light on creates heat which expands the glass, turning it off causes it cool and contract. Over time the imperfection got to a critical moment and a tiny fluctuation in the ambient temperature in the room pushed it past the point of critical failure, even though the light was not on.

Not saying 100% this is what happened, but that seems to be the most logical explanation to me.

DC

That seems about right, nothings perfect anyway, and the working parameters were always compromised by outside influences, like an accidental or, (deliberate) knock on the bulb. There is some history attached to the incandescent light bulb, a very welcoming and warm light, but very inefficient for the same reason.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


I have spent more money on light bulbs lately than I thought possible.

I finally asked the light dept guy at Lowe's.

He told me the more wattage does not make it brighter that LUMENS do. SO you have to find a bulb with the correct or lesser wattage and the lumens to give the light you want.

I was using the incorrect wattage and my light bulbs were blowing almost daily. THey glass bulb part would blow from the silver part that screws into the socket.

so, check the correct wattage for your lamp.

Since I followed his advice, I have not had any blown bulbs.

BUT a word of caution..a HALOGEN bulb is very very very bright. I bought one for my reading light. It was too bright.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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zilebeliveunknown
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 

It's aliens or poltergeist.
Move along, it's just the reminder of their presence.


You know some strange things have happened here lately which is why this creeped me out. Today at two different times there was a knock at my door but NOBODY was there. Both animals stared at the door and i got chills.

No idea what that was.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


My dog was no where near the lamp. He is too short to even reach it. He only went over to it after it popped.


I am guessing it was faulty glass. It's a fairly new bulb and I do use it every night. It's just weird it happened when it wasn't on.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by FrenchOsage
 


Yea the wiring looks fine, no frays and I've never had it flicker or do anything like you mentioned. The lamp seems to be made pretty well. I am not sure of the manufacturer. There was a felt sticker on the bottom but it came off and I saved it in a box. The lamp itself seems to be wood and the top is like brass or some metal. It's pretty heavy. There are two bulb sockets. I only use one 90% of the time. I also don't use anything higher than a 45 or 60 in any lamp. I find the higher ones too bright.


I will have my moms husband look at it because he knows about electrical. I unplugged it for now.

Thanks



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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Staroth
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


I would get my electric checked asap if I were you. Hopefully it wasn't a mercury bulb!

Here's a link for some known causes.
What causes a light bulb to explode
edit on 6-10-2013 by Staroth because: (no reason given)



My electric is fine. Nothing else in the house has ever had a problem, ever. Never had a surge or anything that would indicate an electrical problem. My computer and tv stuff are all plugged into the same electrical outlet.

No I don't use mercury bulbs, they are ridiculously expensive and too bright. I prefer the old fashioned bulbs



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


I have used the same bulbs and wattage since I got the lamp. I use the same bulbs for all my lamps, this has never happened.

I'm just going to go with it was a bad bulb. I still have 2 bulbs in a couple lamps that are still working after a year!!

I tried those fancy coil bulbs and one broke and I just didn't like how bright they were nor the cost. $7 bucks for one bulb is insane. I have like 5 lamps in my living room. I have a thing for lamps lol




posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:24 PM
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i am a decorator to trade and the only times i have seen a light bulb blow like that one was when a powerfull wallpaper stripping machine was involved .

as soon as drips hit the bulb it would blow violently but as this one was not plugged in it is a mystery to me



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:30 PM
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xDeadcowx
I am no expert, but my first instinct was that there was some kind of imperfection in the glass.




Thats really it.
Glass is weird stuff, and has all sorts of internal stresses when made into human-desired shapes.
There are any number of stories about glass objects spontaneously breaking while just sitting on the shelf.




A few years ago, I purchased a lump of glass from an estate sale for no other reason that it was beautiful and I wanted it. I set it on a shelf with the rest of my collectibles to collect dust.
This morning at 8AM on the dot, the lump of glass shattered into a million pieces with a pretty loud explosion. There were no visible forces acting on it. No sunshine or anything else I could detect.


Its more common than people think.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Hi blah blah




posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Hi there, and you are welcome.

"The lamp seems to be made pretty well. I am not sure of the manufacturer"

It honestly does not matter. The best, most expensive incandescent bulb you can buy can still have a small imperfection in the glass. It's not common, but it does happen. Each producer will have specs that allow for a certain number per 100 or 1000, or whatever. to have flaws. Nothing produced on an assembly line is perfect - still incandescent bulbs are very reliable and buy all you can while you can, I believe they still are planning on outlawing them in the US.


By all means have someone look at the luminaire if it's easy to do so, and it certainly will make you more comfortable with the situation...but if it were mine, I would not rewire it (and I could probably do so blindfolded). I personally would sweep up the broken glass, stick a new bulb in and forget all about it.



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 08:47 PM
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Once when I was a teenager (long time ago) I was really angry with a teacher. As I walked inot my Mum's front room the bulb exploded into tiny fragments.

Years later I found out microwaves can explode GLS bulbs or at least make the glass pop off their silver elements.

If you are being microwaved by Directed Energy Weapons this could be the sign that you are. This is one reason GLS bulbs were got rid of.

The door knocks suggest that something else is going on.
An EMF measuring device will show if you are.




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