How Did Planet Earth Sustain Dinosaur Life For Over 100 Million Years?

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posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by Hydrawolf
 


How did mammals exists for tens of millions of years - given than some mammalian species have been bigger than any dinosaur, including the largest creature ever know to have existed?

It's, er, life.




posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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liejunkie01 Thanks, and i am sure that after 100 million years a few of them dinosaurs with the larger brains were a bit smarter than we give them credit for.


some of them even had multiple brains!




supermarket2012 Homo sapiens are said to be 200,000 years old, in our current evolutionary expression. Homo sapiens - 200,000 years old, but civilization? Oh, just 6,000 years. Yea......something doesn't add up. Then you think of dinosaurs. Not only did they roam the earth for hundreds of millions of years......but they DIED OFF hundreds of millions of years ago too. That is just so long. Weird when you think of it.


you seem to forget about the alien virus that speeded up our evolutionary process.




posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 09:02 PM
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supermarket2012


Can you point me in the direction where I can learn more about what we currently know as far as civilization development leading up to Sumeria?

Everything I learned in college basically said that it (not literally of course) happened overnight.....referring to the creation of Sumeria. I was taught that we have no direct evidence that shows us how we got from point A to point B.

This is something that interests me greatly, so I'd love to learn more on the subject.


Stolen from


www.abovetopsecret.com...

Late Paleolithic, from 40th millennium BC Aterian tool-making
Semi-permanent dwellings in Wadi Halfa
Tools made from animal bones, hematite, and other stones

Neolithic, from 11th millennium BC c. 10,500 BC: Wild grain harvesting along the Nile, grain-grinding culture creates world's earliest stone sickle blades[2] roughly at end of Pleistocene
c. 8000 BC: Migration of peoples to the Nile, developing a more centralized society and settled agricultural economy
c. 7500 BC: Importing animals from Asia to Sahara
c. 7000 BC: Agriculture—animal and cereal—in East Sahara
c. 7000 BC: in Nabta Playa deep year-round water wells dug, and large organized settlements designed in planned arrangements
c. 6000 BC: Rudimentary ships (rowed, single-sailed) depicted in Egyptian rock art
c. 5500 BC: Stone-roofed subterranean chambers and other subterranean complexes in Nabta Playa containing buried sacrificed cattle
c. 5000 BC: Alleged archaeoastronomical stone megalith in Nabta Playa.[citation needed]
c. 5000 BC: Badarian; furniture, tableware, models of rectangular houses, pots, dishes, cups, bowls, vases, figurines, combs
c. 4400 BC: finely-woven linen fragment

Inventing prevalent, from 4th millennium BC By 3400 BC: Cosmetics
Donkey domestication
(Meteoric) iron works
Mortar (masonry)

c. 4000 BC: early Naqadan trade (see Silk Road)

4th millennium BC: Gerzean tomb-building, including underground rooms and burial of furniture and amulets
4th millennium BC: Cedar imported from Lebanon
c. 3900 BC: An aridification event in the Sahara leads to human migration to the Nile Valley
c. 3500 BC: Lapis lazuli imported from Badakshan and / or Mesopotamia (see Silk Road)
c. 3300 BC: Double reed instruments and lyres
c. 3500 BC: Senet, world's oldest-board game
c. 3500 BC: Faience, world's earliest-known glazed ceramic beads
c. 3100 BC: Pharaoh Narmer unified Upper and Lower Egypt
Late Paleolithic, from 40th millennium BC Aterian tool-making
Semi-permanent dwellings in Wadi Halfa
Tools made from animal bones, hematite, and other stones

Neolithic, from 11th millennium BC c. 10,500 BC: Wild grain harvesting along the Nile, grain-grinding culture creates world's earliest stone sickle blades[2] roughly at end of Pleistocene
c. 8000 BC: Migration of peoples to the Nile, developing a more centralized society and settled agricultural economy
c. 7500 BC: Importing animals from Asia to Sahara
c. 7000 BC: Agriculture—animal and cereal—in East Sahara
c. 7000 BC: in Nabta Playa deep year-round water wells dug, and large organized settlements designed in planned arrangements
c. 6000 BC: Rudimentary ships (rowed, single-sailed) depicted in Egyptian rock art
c. 5500 BC: Stone-roofed subterranean chambers and other subterranean complexes in Nabta Playa containing buried sacrificed cattle
c. 5000 BC: Alleged archaeoastronomical stone megalith in Nabta Playa.[citation needed]
c. 5000 BC: Badarian; furniture, tableware, models of rectangular houses, pots, dishes, cups, bowls, vases, figurines, combs
c. 4400 BC: finely-woven linen fragment

Inventing prevalent, from 4th millennium BC By 3400 BC: Cosmetics
Donkey domestication
(Meteoric) iron works
Mortar (masonry)

c. 4000 BC: early Naqadan trade (see Silk Road)

4th millennium BC: Gerzean tomb-building, including underground rooms and burial of furniture and amulets
4th millennium BC: Cedar imported from Lebanon
c. 3900 BC: An aridification event in the Sahara leads to human migration to the Nile Valley
c. 3500 BC: Lapis lazuli imported from Badakshan and / or Mesopotamia (see Silk Road)
c. 3300 BC: Double reed instruments and lyres
c. 3500 BC: Senet, world's oldest-board game
c. 3500 BC: Faience, world's earliest-known glazed ceramic beads
c. 3100 BC: Pharaoh Narmer unified Upper and Lower Egypt



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 06:39 AM
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Hydrawolf
This is just a random question that popped into my head just now. I guess a lot of them were meat eaters so that was a good form of population control and would have kept the ground fertile. I am surprised that vegetation levels could have sustained the plant eating dinosaurs for so long though. I know there is no specific answer to what their population levels were as a whole during this time, but i could only assume that billions of them roamed the land over that period. 100 million years is a hell of a long time.


Whoa!! Hydrawolf ... great thread!! One of the best I've seen in a while. Great question soliciting opinions, five lines long, three pages of entertaining responses. ... Now this is why I opened an account on ATS!!

Here's my contribution: The Earth's a pretty amazing place. Been all over it. There are a lot of scientists that think they've got things all figured out right from the classroom. 'Nuff said?? I'll take the ATS approach: fingers to keyboard; tinfoil hat strapped; flame-proof armor; lots of education that lacked imagination; decades of worldly experience; all mixed well with a bit of mirth, a dose of skepticism, a heaping helping of common sense, and a snarl that says you'd better agree with me and no one else ... dammit!

Dinosaurs: Haven't seen any, have you? What we've got laying around ain't even bones. We got fossils though. What makes one skeleton fossilize ... but not all of 'em ... or even most of 'em? Ever ask yourself that question? I wanna make just one salient point about dinosaurs: When I was a kid, dinosaurs all dragged their tails on the ground. Sometime in the last 50 years, they stopped doing that. How, pray tell, could that have happened? Peer review fail there?

Now some guy from the "supermarket" thinks people have only been around for at least a couple hundred thousand years. I think they've been around for a LOT longer than that and I don't care what the fossil record "fails to prove." This guy's asking the right kinds of questions and is probably going to write a very interesting book one day ... if he keeps at it

Everyone please take note that I said "a LOT longer" so you don't think I'm gettin' all biblical on ya later. Fossilized people bones may just not last much longer than that. The ones that were that old were pretty much a mess, weren't they? Had those lain around another ten thousand years (the merest fraction of 100 million years I might point out) they may never have been found.

You see, if you just rely on settled science to tell you how to think ... then they get to own the field. Deny ignorance in your own mind every chance you get. You'll either get surly (like ole Snarl) or you'll fully develop a sense of humor (and I REALLY have a lot of respect for the ATS curmudgeons who put the subtle one over on me from time-to-time).

There was some guy with a "blue trident" with a very astute observation relative (I love that word ... lemme say it again ... relative) ... relative to ecological balance or harmony of the environment. That might mean there were not very many dinosaurs at any given time, but over a hundred million years, they may have made a significant contribution to the 'existing' fossil record. My mind keeps straying off and wondering about the non-existing fossil record. If every dinosaur didn't leave fossils behind, there must be a non-existing fossil record, no? See? That's why ATS is NEVER going to fail as a site of interest. I think it's hard for people to get right down to the jiggy and stab their fingers deep into the belly of these doggone PhDs who want to own the right to speak

... uh oh ... pause

For those of you who are young and impressionable, for those of you who cannot accept that you're part of the unwashed masses, or can't accept you're encountering members of the unwashed masses every where you go, be careful about taking what I'm saying here into a debate. You will turn the 'educated' into rabid snarling defenders of the only truth they know how to grasp. You try this in class, and you're gonna fail ... 'cause that's the best defense TPTB have got ... and it works all too well.

Okay ... unpause ... slight rewind

I think it's hard for people to get right down to the jiggy and stab their fingers deep into the belly of these doggone PhDs who want to own the right to speak and keep you silent and ignorant. Don't let 'em use big words on you, don't let 'em cite peer reviewed papers (they didn't EVER seek my input!!), don't let 'em keep you ignorant - deny it. Hang out here and get smart ... learn 'how' to think.

One thing about the passage of time, is that it allows for random things to happen. Lots of random things. That "hounddog" dude said it pretty well, "a combination of things allowed them (dinosaurs) to live and thrive", but it was time that allowed the combination to occur (over and over apparently) at just the right time. Just like poor old "JoeCubed" showed up at the wrong time and probably doesn't want to be a member anymore. -Heh Heh- "Chuck" that was nasty.



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 09:17 AM
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'd like to share a revelation that I've had during my time here. It came to me when I tried to classify your species and I realized that you're not actually mammals.

Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with the surrounding environment but you humans do not.

You move to an area and you multiply and multiply until every natural resource is consumed and the only way you can survive is to spread to another area.

There is another organism on this planet that follows the same pattern. Do you know what it is? A virus. Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet.



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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luciddream
Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with the surrounding environment but you humans do not.

It's from the matrix, and it's also a total bs claim..



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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double
edit on 7-10-2013 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by rhinoceros
 


lol it was a quote to reinforce that Human are generally destructive on how they use the planet compared to an animal would.

Do you think and agree Animals harm to the planet is comparable to humans?



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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luciddream
reply to post by rhinoceros
 


Do you think and agree Animals harm to the planet is comparable to humans?

No. I just find the claim that animals instinctively develop a natural equilibrium with their environment nonsense. Animals are generally kept in check by their environment, be it top-down or bottom-up control (these are concepts from ecology). For the last few hundred years, humans have been pretty good escaping this control, almost complete thanks to oil..



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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DancedWithWolves
Good question! Maybe because dinosaurs DIDN'T build nuclear reactors on the Pacific Ocean and radiate themselves into extinction. And they didn't hoard money either! Pretty smart critters. Maybe we could learn a thing or two.


The K.T event would make all of our world nuclear arsenal laughble. It blew up with the force of around 70 teratons (or roughly 140,000,000 Hiroshima bombs) when our nuclear arsenal can barely generate 50 gigatons of fire power (1000 gigatons is 1 teraton) the explosion created a hole on the planet with 180-kilometre-wide (112 mi) in the Gulf of Mexico. The dust covered the sun for almost than year killing 57% of the plants and you can imagine what happend with all the sauropods and teorops after an year without food, water and sun.

Therere are archeologist vestiges of dinossaurs surviving 2-3 milions of years after the destruction, but that theory isn't take too much serilious.

Dinossaurs adapted with the life conditions of it's time, but unlikely mamals could not adapt for big chances and could easily become extinct.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 05:10 PM
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Well mainly because of the balance obtained in the ecosystem. There were billions of living creatures on the earth, and many were not carnivorous. There was also more oxygen in the atmosphere, which is partly how these animals got so large to begin with. Dinosaurs would have continued to rule the world if not for the cataclysmic extinction event that allowed mammals to take over.



posted on Oct, 8 2013 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Hydrawolf
 


Well mate, considering there are 7+billion people on earth, not counting every other animal and insect and we seem to be doing just dandy with plenty of room for more. Dinosaurs would have been just as well off. There were less species groups then, many of the things we see today didn't exist then.

Keep in mind, many things out lived the dinosaurs and all the horrific disasters.

en.wikipedia.org...

280 million years ago this plant first popped up. They still grow today.



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 04:45 PM
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supermarket2012
It is weird, isn't it?

Homo sapiens are said to be 200,000 years old, in our current evolutionary expression. Homo sapiens - 200,000 years old, but civilization? Oh, just 6,000 years. Yea......something doesn't add up.


Civilization has been around for a lot longer than 6,000 years buddy. Civilization has been around for at least 12,000 years and most likely even longer than that.


supermarket2012

Then you think of dinosaurs. Not only did they roam the earth for hundreds of millions of years......but they DIED OFF hundreds of millions of years ago too. That is just so long. Weird when you think of it.

To be honest, the dates of evolutionary events have always seem fishy to me.


Dinosaurs did not die off hundreds of millions of years ago. Damn what the hell are they teaching in schools these days?

Of course evolutionary events will seem fishy when you get them WRONG.



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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Firepac
Civilization has been around for a lot longer than 6,000 years buddy. Civilization has been around for at least 12,000 years and most likely even longer than that.


Depends on how you define civilisation, but based on most accepted definitions, 6,000 years is about right.



Dinosaurs did not die off hundreds of millions of years ago. Damn what the hell are they teaching in schools these days?


Aye, it was only 65 million years ago - though some did survive and are feeding in your garden today



posted on Oct, 29 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Hydrawolf
 


Dinosaurs are still around!!!! What do you think birds are? They are theropod dinosaurs no doubt. Dinosaurs were not reptiles at all but warm blooded critters with hollow bones and many had feathers. Most dinosaur species were not huge either, and some could fly or had wings. Birds have evolved a beak and a shorter tail but are sometimes referred to as avian dinosaurs I believe. I once saw a fossil of the ancestor of the T Rex in a museum and it had feathers.





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