SSRI Medications Involved in Mass Shootings?

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posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


I know you're being somewhat factious in that... But all too many do blame the tool, rather than what may very well be the cause, or at least part of the cause. This incredible tendency to drug a problem away, at the cost of actually treating the affliction.

Drugs do play a part in treating many an illness, but all too many of these drugs have side effects that are just as disturbing as what they're treating...

Yet nothing is said, or at least not enough is said. The fourth estate is virtually silent on the topic.




posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 10:56 AM
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elcapitano75
But for those like me, there was really no other option (tried everything else before i gave in) and they have helped a LOT. I feel pretty lucky because i do think... in some people they can maybe have unpredictable ... outcomes.



For me, a huge hurdle was getting over myself.

Just as it is difficult to type "I need these medications because of an imbalance within my body", it is very hard to come to terms with it internally. I am from a mid western family. Men are men, and sheep run scared. No seriously, men don't need drugs to help, they handle it on their own. They don't spend hours in a dark room. They just start to laugh and go out and get on with life. They don't have an "imbalance", that means they are inherently flawed in and of themselves.

This took me YEARS to overcome. It cost me dearly.



- SN



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by seagull
 


Cognitive-behavioral therapy is actually becoming more popular lately, this is basically changing behavior through changing thinking patterns - it uses a lot of really neat tricks and can treat anything from anxiety, to depression, to obsessive-compulsive disorder and is even one of the only and most effective treatments for certain things like personality disorders (anti-social personality disorder) and (dependent personality disorder).

It is cheaper and more effective than medications for the insurance companies, plus, the effects are usually lasting.

I experienced it personally, however, and it is extremely scary - I was working on getting rid of O.C.D. - in my case, it vastly reduced the amount of O.C.D. behavior I had.

Some things - like does the behavior have a realistic benefit? Could I spend five minutes a day worrying at an extreme intensity during "worry time" and let the rest of the day go, knowing that I have worry time later?

Wikipedia: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

I believe that there are side-effects from pharmaceutical drugs, even if some of them are not necessarily negative, they might be neutral ones that could affect lifestyle changes or subtle changes in skill sets or social interactions.
edit on 1-10-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by SadistNocturne
 


You might be right about that. Getting over the fact that we need help, well at least in my case, not getting over it caused problems as well.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by darkbake
 





I saw that... sorry, I disagree. There are healthcare professionals that are worried about this issue that I am bringing up


So are but not for the reasons you have outlined many think that we are to quick to use SSRI's and anti-depressives before addressing the core cause of the depression.



I certainly hope you are aware of the dangers involving withdrawals from SSRI's and the dangers involving taking them without a prescription or erratically.


Yes I know that, and its one of the big problems with threads like this you need to be taken off them slowly and in a controlled way. Reading a thread like this might just prompt someone to stop them over night and that could cause problems.



I think part of the problem is lack of education in the healthcare profession. The pharmaceutical industries publish a lot of literature, do they not?


The education i have received has been first class and the bible i use for anything related to drugs is the BNF, which is not published the "Big Pharma" but of course the people that make the durgs are the ones who publish the information. But the problem is that many laypersons dont know how to interpret this information and provide a academic critique.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


You know, it's funny, I think I have written on here something along the lines that it can be more dangerous to give a Democrat a gun than a Republican because the Republicans are pretty intense and serious about gun safety and all of that, and are way into gun literature.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by Bassago
 


Ok banned is probably a little strong

but I really think something needs to be done about them.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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OtherSideOfTheCoin

Yes I know that, and its one of the big problems with threads like this you need to be taken off them slowly and in a controlled way. Reading a thread like this might just prompt someone to stop them over night and that could cause problems.



Yeah that is definitely true. People shouldn't do that. . .



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by OtherSideOfTheCoin
 


I edited some of my earlier posts to focus the scope on erratic or off-label usage.
edit on 1-10-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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darkbake


just a heads up, I shot you a message a few minutes ago...it's slow to put up the flag on my end from what I've noticed when you get a private message....



- SN



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:26 AM
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Honestly, there is depression, and then there is DEPRESSION.

In my case, there was no way to just, think a certain way, be positive, "get over it" or anything like that.

A lot of people have no idea, no clue of how bad it can manifest beyone emotional or mental, right into true physical pain. And for no actual reason what-so-ever (no any experience or any actual event) And no idea of how painful it can be. Sure a lot of people probably do need to just "get over themselves", or talk it out, or go out and shoot a few hoops or something. I think a lot of people could benifit from therapy too, without drugs. But, not all of us are so lucky.

SSRI's can work and for some have been a life saver. Whether someone needs them or not, one size doesn't fit all.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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elcapitano75
Honestly, there is depression, and then there is DEPRESSION.

In my case, there was no way to just, think a certain way, be positive, "get over it" or anything like that.

A lot of people have no idea, no clue of how bad it can manifest beyone emotional or mental, right into true physical pain. And for no actual reason what-so-ever (no any experience or any actual event) And no idea of how painful it can be. Sure a lot of people probably do need to just "get over themselves", or talk it out, or go out and shoot a few hoops or something. I think a lot of people could benifit from therapy too, without drugs. But, not all of us are so lucky.

SSRI's can work and for some have been a life saver. Whether someone needs them or not, one size doesn't fit all.


I remember days when I just couldn't even fake it at work any longer, and I'd simply get up and leave. Corporate work culture somehow allowed me to slip through it. I had no clue what was going on inside.

Once, when I was in my late twenties, I swore I was having a heart attack, pain down the left arm, erratic heartbeat, etc. Went to the ER. They treated me like scum when they checked and could tell with tests there was no physical sign of a heart attack. Today, I know them all to well as panic attacks.

I hope we see culture change so that "mental health" isn't something that is as demonized as it is today. I hope it's something that people can actually seek help for and even be pointed to, rather than find out after the fact "Oh, THAT's what I've been dealing with????"


- SN



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:40 AM
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I do believe that some people fair better when prescribed these medications.

That being said I did not. But, ultimately it was up to me to recognize drugs wasn't the route for me, and rather cognitive behavioral therapy was the better fit for me. You see, my depression and anxiety resulted from a specific event. I don't have a chemical balance, I was violently attacked by a battle buddy I was to expect had my back. Not have predatory designs upon my person.

So, perhaps this is a distinction that psychologists need to pay more attention to. Did the persons depression/anxiety/PTSD result from an event - or is this a disorder they have been struggling with from a young age, indicating a biological chemical imbalance?

I had a psychotic reaction to being on these drugs. I think, because I have no chemical imbalance - my PTSD and depression was the result of the event. So now I'm on cognitive behavioral therapy - and doing much better.

This is only my opinion and personal experience, not advice. Talk to your head doc before making any changes to your treatment plan.

CdT



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


...and that will probably, in the long run, be more effective than drugging 'em. IMHO. Or used in concert with lower dosages.

Just my uninformed opinion... Less is more sometimes.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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Nobody is saying that people have to like or agree with SSRIs, but one thing that even the medication haters need to PLEASE be aware of ...

Please, please, please do not EVER suggest that someone quit an SSRI cold turkey. The emotional state that it can lead to, the "brain zaps" that happen when your brain begins to chew up that serotonin ... it sucks. It sucks bad. Some people can handle it, most cannot. You'll never truly know how difficult it is unless you have been through it and done it.

I took SSRIs for 7 years following the death of my newborn son. I was a wreck, and SSRIs (Lexapro, specifically) did wonders for my emotional state. I firmly believe that they are what helped me get on with life and get to where I am now.

I weened off of SSRIs about 6 months ago. I was taking a pill a day. I went to one every other day, then one every fourth day. After a bit of doing that, I stopped them completely. Even on a self-ween like that, it was INCREDIBLY difficult. It took about 2 months for me to get to where I felt like a real person without them, and I handled it remarkably well as compared to some.

Please understand that telling someone to quit an SSRI cold turkey can lead to disasterous and potentially lethal consequences. There is nothing wrong with being against SSRIs, but please educate yourself on the proper way to stop taking them so you can recommend a proper method. The last thing we need is armchair doctors telling people to cold turkey off of those.

This is not directed at any single person here. This is just a general statement that I felt really needed to be said.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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CirqueDeTruth
-- snip --
So, perhaps this is a distinction that psychologists need to pay more attention to. Did the persons depression/anxiety/PTSD result from an event - or is this a disorder they have been struggling with from a young age, indicating a biological chemical imbalance?

I had a psychotic reaction to being on these drugs. I think, because I have no chemical imbalance - my PTSD and depression was the result of the event. So now I'm on cognitive behavioral therapy - and doing much better.
-- snip --


Are you familiar with EMDR, yet? The link is just a suggestion for a starting point. There's lots more info out there.

As someone who fought depression and PTSD from childhood, I can offer my personal positive results with EMDR. Like everything else, it's not the answer for everyone and isn't the only tool in my toolbox but I'm living a much happier life these days than I ever had before.

All my best to you. May the future hold peace and happiness for you.



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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SSRI's are a contributing factor to some of these shootings in my opinion. I have seen what they do to some people's personalities.
edit on 1-10-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by CornShucker
 


Thanks for the info! Sadly, there is not a session available in my state. The closest is Ohio.

I wonder if this is related to the program my therapist wants me to enroll in that will send me to Florida to participate in for six weeks. It's not practical for me, as I've four minor children in the home, and a physically disabled husband. It's an inpatient program. I'll have to print off the information and discuss it with my therapist later this month when I go for a appt.

Thanks Again,
CdT



posted on Oct, 1 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by SadistNocturne
 


Exactly.

Millions of people take these drugs daily for years on end. We don't have millions of mass shootings going on do we?

Coming off these SSRI's without a Dr's supervision is dangerous and unpleasant. There have been reports of people feeling very moody, and having intrusive thoughts coming off these cold turkey.

It seems like we never want to actually stare the problem in the face, we always want some easy excuse wrapped up neatly with a bow to point at.

I believe the real issue with these shootings is the pathetic mental health care system we have in America. Ever ride the bus? That guy over there really does think he's Jesus -- and that other homeless looking guy thinks he's talking to Nixon.

Instead of looking deeper into the problem, we shout and point at an easy excuse. These drugs help millions of people every day get out of bed and be productive.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


This is definitely a hard concept to interact with, however there could be people engaging in (mass) shootings who have been messing with their prescriptions without doctor supervision, or where something has gone wrong with their medications -

S.S.R.I.'s in particular can cause manic phases and bad judgement that would make engaging in a mass shooting extremely easy compared to normal, especially when a dose is increased without responsive measures being taken -

If there is a withdrawal, violence or anger and erratic behavior is highly likely, if not unstoppable. Once again, a withdrawal would most likely due to dosage misuse.

----------

What I am saying here is, we have a situation where someone becomes temporarily not in control of their actions and could engage in a mass shooting that not only ruins a lot of lives, but their own reputation and life. That is a big event - and if that kind of thing is related to S.S.R.I.'s (which I find highly likely) that is an issue -

I do realize that they help a lot of people in general, and I think I am going to stick by the story that it is dosage misuse that can result in disaster, for the most part,

Unless someone is suffering from the side-effects from S.S.R.I.'s (like mania and bad judgement) and has them mostly under control due to practice.





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