Double sunset in many photographs lately, any clues?

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posted on Sep, 29 2013 @ 11:33 PM
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Phage
reply to post by Metaphysique
 

He thought the Earth was the center of the Universe and the the Sun, stars, and planets all revolved around it in 55 perfect crystal spheres.

How's that?

more patronizing deflection


I'll grant you this:
you do not play the fool well.
(regardless of the head in the sand stance )

I'm more interested in your reasons for excluding fireballs or other astronomical phenomena
in favor of a meteorological/optical explanation....

sort of like Aristotle did...(you do see the parallels?)




posted on Sep, 29 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by Metaphysique
 


more patronizing deflection
You asked me to "debunk" Aristotle. His grasp of astronomy was less than factual. Not his fault.




I'm more interested in your reasons for excluding fireballs or other astronomical phenomena
in favor of a meteorological/optical explanation....

Because they look exactly like sundogs and nothing like fireballs...for starters.
You will note too, that in this case, Aristotle merely recorded his observations.
edit on 9/29/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)
edit on 9/29/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 01:35 AM
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Phage
reply to post by Metaphysique
 


more patronizing deflection
a-You asked me to "debunk" Aristotle. His grasp of astronomy was less than factual. Not his fault.




I'm more interested in your reasons for excluding fireballs or other astronomical phenomena
in favor of a meteorological/optical explanation....

b-Because they look exactly like sundogs and nothing like fireballs...for starters.
c-You will note too, that in this case, Aristotle merely recorded his observations.
edit on 9/29/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)
edit on 9/29/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


a-did you not note the use of the lol emote-icon ? it was a Rhetorical Statement.

b-?dismissive now



c-wow... and in light of your previous statement, ironic

so...

you've basically provided the OP with a questionable,...
well, untrustworthy, source in defense of your stated stance which actually led to the OP to stop denying ignorance and take an explanation on faith, and stop questioning .

better stop, before you debunk yourself.



"IF FORTUNE SMILE, YOU MAY FROM A RHETOR BECOME A CONSUL; IF FORTUNE FROWN, THE CONSUL MAY BECOME A RHETOR."




good night



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by Metaphysique
 




you've basically provided the OP with a questionable,... well, untrustworthy, source in defense of your stated stance which actually led to the OP to stop denying ignorance and take an explanation on faith, and stop questioning .

I have no idea what you are trying to say or what images of the Russian meteor have to do with sundogs or multiple suns.



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by Metaphysique
 


Metaphysique --

The OP is not describing a fireball meteor streaking across the sky. He is describing an additional ball of light along with then sun at sunset. That description, along with his pictures, is consistent with sundogs, not a fireball.



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by Metaphysique
 


Fireballs move quite fast, streaking across the sky with light and smoke.

They do not look like a second sun hanging in the sky.

The images of the Russian meteor that you posted are a split second capture of an event that happened in several seconds.

Again, Fireballs do NOT look like a second sun in the sky, as the sun sits there and does not rapidly move, streaking across the sky.

Comets also do not look like a second sun. While they do appear to hang in the sky, they have a long tail.....something the sun does not have.

Sundogs on the other hand, can and do look like a second sun. And Sundogs are an atmospheric event.



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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Ploutonas
these photographs taken at 29th of september 2013 (Greece, mainland)
www.katohika.gr...

While the others are just likely sundogs, this one is not:



One way to easily detect lens flare is to draw a line between the flare and the optical center of the photo and see if it passes on any light source:



Sometimes, the geometrical center of the photo does not coincide with its optical center, thus the non-perfect alignment of the light source and its flare:



But this is not the case in this photo (and the others of the same series).

edit on 30-9-2013 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 01:41 PM
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In OP's defence, I remember seeing something rainbowy near the Sun long ago. I was perplexed, as I didn't know what it was, and I knew that the real rainbows appear opposite the Sun when there's rain. So I asked around, and someone replied that it was a sundog. Thanks to this, I have discovered the wonderful world of ice halos: en.wikipedia.org...

There are circles, arcs, lines, and a whole other plethora of halos to be spotted. Most of them are pretty rare, and are usually seen in freezing climates like Siberia or Alaska. But sundogs are quite common around the world, people just need to look up more.

The most bautiful halo I've seen is the circumzenithal arc. It appears like an a bright and vivid upside-down segment of a rainbow, near zenith: en.wikipedia.org...

You can learn more about the various halos here: www.atoptics.co.uk...



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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elevenaugust

Sometimes, the geometrical center of the photo does not coincide with its optical center, thus the non-perfect alignment of the light source and its flare:



But this is not the case in this photo (and the others of the same series).


This can happen if the photo has been cropped.

Excellent illustrations, 11Aug!





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