No Chickenpox Vaccine? No school during active cases. Fair?

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posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


When I was a child if someone in our street had measles chickenpox mumps or whatever, we'd all be sent around to that childs house for our dose of natural immunity.
When I was a child the mosquito trucks sprayed DDT through the neighborhoods.

Did you know that 1 in 10 of your compatriots developed serious complications from chicken pox? Did you know that?


However, since the vaccine giants launched themselves upon us we are now told to fear these illnesses.
No. The diseases have always been feared. Intentional exposure is a pretty dumb idea, indicative of ignorance of consequences.
edit on 9/27/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Every single one of my family members has had chicken pox (including my children who were vaccinated against it). Not a single one of us died or had complications from it. We were just itchy. In my family we've only had 1 case of an adult getting shingles later on in life. That would be my maternal grandmother. My maternal grandfather did not get shingles despite living with her.

Chicken pox infections are generally mild in children and are only treated insofar as relieving the itching. Adult cases (shingles), however, are dangerous if the adult has an impaired immune system (hence why the doctors told me not to touch my kids post-vaccination or during their infections).

If the discussion were about rubella, polio, diptheria, HEP B, or any other of the other vaccinations, I would agree that not getting your child immunized is a bad idea. Chicken pox? In kids, it's generally just itchy central.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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What I would like to know, is have childhood diseases gotten worse than say 20 years ago, or 30 or even 40 years ago? I remember when growing up, certain diseases like Chicken Pox, the Mumps, Measles were something that the common wisdom was that children get at an yearly age and then were good to go after such. Now it seems like people are terrified of the childhood diseases, that at one time were something common and they had parties for. Beyond a certain demographic, it should not be such the fear as it gets.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by antar
 

Does the chicken pox vaccine use adjuvants?
No? Oh well.
www.cdc.gov...

Sorry. I can't buy into a website that claims that all vaccines are bad.

edit on 9/27/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


From CDC


The incubation period for varicella (Chicken Pox) is 14 to 16 days after exposure to a varicella or a herpes zoster rash, with a range of 10 to 21 days. In children, the rash is often the first sign of disease.

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Varicella is highly contagious. The virus spreads in the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It can also be spread by touching or breathing in aerosolized virus from varicella lesions. A person with varicella is contagious from 1-2 days before rash onset until the lesions have crusted. It takes from 10-21 days after exposure to the virus for someone to develop varicella. Based on studies of transmission among household members, about 90% of susceptible close contacts will get varicella after exposure to persons with disease.

Stuff is airborne. I had it as a kid and I hated it. Even with vaccination kids are still susceptible and contagious to a lesser degree.


They usually have a shorter illness compared to unvaccinated people who get varicella.

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One study of varicella transmission in a household setting found that persons with mild breakthrough varicella (< 50 lesions) were one third as contagious as unvaccinated persons with varicella. However, persons with breakthrough varicella with 50 or more lesions can be just as contagious as unvaccinated persons.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 




In kids, it's generally just itchy central.

Usually, yes. With one in ten, not so much.
But it's not just about protecting a kid.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:38 PM
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I remember being the first kid in my neighborhood to get chicken pox, I had to be the one to lick the envelopes to invite all the neighbor kids. Everyone survived.

The current state of affairs in all area's of life in the United States is a state of fear. Fear terrorists, fear diseases, fear getting locked up by cps for not following status quo, fear going to movie theaters and marathons, fear the police and the tazers, fear global warming, fear guns.....

Oh yeah.. I almost forgot, fear chicken pox.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by litterbaux
 

In my community kids with chicken pox stayed home and no one went to visit them.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:40 PM
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I had them twice as a kid. I guess if you only get a very mild case the first time around, the second time it can be a lot worse. I can attest it was because I missed a full two weeks of school and I was covered from head to toe O.o But I lived through them. I remember back then when someone's kid got them, all the parents wanted their kids exposed, so they'd bring their kids by to play or have chicken pox parties.

My three older kids were not vaccinated and all have had them. My youngest two, who are nine now, had to get a vaccination and I was surprised when I got that information. I didn't think it was necessary but hey, the government knows what's best for my kids.

When you get them as you get older, they can be deadly. It would seem more logical to me to just let kids get them when they're young, that way there's no chance to contract them as an adult. Then again, if you've ever had the chicken pox, you have a high chance of getting shingles when you are much older, so those don't sound very fun either.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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Phage
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


When I was a child if someone in our street had measles chickenpox mumps or whatever, we'd all be sent around to that childs house for our dose of natural immunity.
When I was a child the mosquito trucks sprayed DDT through the neighborhoods.

Did you know that 1 in 10 of your compatriots developed serious complications from chicken pox? Did you know that?
No I didn't. I'm approaching 60 now and I'm wondering where the 1 in 10 are hiding!
However, what we know for a FACT is that when I was a child autism was extremely rare, but since vaccinations started its risen to 1 in 80 in the uk, some places in the US its 1 in 60.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 

Of course, that couldn't have anything to do with changes in the method of diagnosis and the criteria used. Right?
edit on 9/27/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 06:47 PM
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Children in the UK are not given a chicken pox vaccine. It's considered a mild illness with the occurrence of complication being so low has to not justify a vaccine programme.

I never had any signs of catching chicken pox as a child but I still have immunity as an adult. I know because they tested me during one of my pregnancies when I came into contact with someone with the virus.

The only real concern I see is the effects of someone who has a weakened immune system because of chemotherapy etc coming into contact with someone with the virus. So I think it makes sense for certain health care workers to have it......but entire classrooms of children?

I am genuinely surprised that a chicken pox vaccine programme exists. In the UK by the age of 12 90% of the population have natural immunity and the lack of a vaccine doesn't seem to be a real problem.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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Phage
reply to post by VoidHawk
 

Of course, that couldn't have anything to do with changes in the method diagnosis and the criteria used. Right?

Your right, it doesnt. In the uk we used to keep people with mental disorders in asylums, but then, just when the vaccines were being heavily pushed we shut down the asylums, basically because they knew that if all those people were placed into asylums the vastly growing numbers would have been obvious.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 

So now it's all forms of mental illness being caused by vaccines? Not just autism?
edit on 9/27/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I grew up very poor, I think parents wanted all the kids to get it when our immune systems were strong to save problems down the road. I just know from my personal experience that the natural progression of growing up for me was to get the chicken pox, like everyone else in the second grade.

The only opinion I have is when man plays God and starts messing with nature, our bodies are perfectly capable of handling the virus, let nature take its course imho.

Some children are born with birth defects, are they going to make a vaccine for conception? The complications from chicken pox is a weak argument for vaccinations. Your comment about autism can be used for chicken pox cases, more documentation means more examples. Nobody I knew went to the doctor for chicken pox, you got a bath in calamine and you stayed home from school. Now every case is documented in some ways, making it look like chicken pox is a pandemic every school year.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:07 PM
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reply to post by litterbaux
 


Some children are born with birth defects, are they going to make a vaccine for conception?
Do you think that reducing birth defects would be a bad thing? Or was that just an agumentum ad absurdum?


Nobody I knew went to the doctor for chicken pox, you got a bath in calamine and you stayed home from school.
So you didn't know anyone who developed serious complications. Does that mean no one did, or does?


Now every case is documented in some ways, making it look like chicken pox is a pandemic every school year.
Do you know what a pandemic is? But I haven't really noticed a big deal being made about chicken pox. Maybe because vaccinations work.
edit on 9/27/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 



Before the chickenpox vaccine was licensed in 1995, almost all people in the United States had suffered from chickenpox by adulthood. Each year, the virus caused an estimated 4 million cases of chicken pox, 11,000 hospitalizations and 100-150 deaths. Source: National Institute of Health


Let's do the math. To obtain the percentage of those 4 million cases that required hospitalization: 11,000/4,000,000= 0.28% That's not even 1 in 100.

Percentage of deaths resulting from chicken pox in these virulent times: 0.004%.

Additionally, the vaccine is claimed to be responsible for decreasing even those few deaths; however, did they consider the development of the drug, acyclovir, in those declining deaths? Acyclovir is generally prescribed to adults with shingles to reduce complications. It's also used in children when they have a compounding illness that results in a suppressed immune system but most children still just get calamine lotion to relieve the itching.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I don't know of anyone, not even one person that has developed complications from chicken pox. Not saying it never happens, people have "complications" from eating peanut butter in certain cases. The reason I made the pandemic comment is because the vaccine is relatively new and the chatter about it online is definitely picking up.

I don't have any problem with the vaccines, if you want your kids to be vaccinated against all diseases and virus's its none of my business. Pump them full for all I care. Don't make my kid miss school tho.

Hey if they work, you don't have anything to worry about anyway, right?



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Oh good the autism argument. Because nothing else has changed over the last few decades. I mean it's not like we've seen a decrease in mental retardation diagnoses.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 



Experience in the USA over the last decade has taught us a lot. From 1995 to 2000, cases declined by around 80%, the largest reductions being in children aged 1–4 years. Concomitant reductions in infants and adults confirmed reduced transmission (herd immunity).12 Hospital admissions declined and mortality rates dropped by 66%, from an average of 0.41 death per 1 million population during 1990–1994 to 0.14 during 1999–2001 (p





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