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James Rawles Video Presentation: Survival Strategies for a Grid Down

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posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 09:54 AM
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People are not used to living in a third world standard, from public health and sanitation perspectives, and between lack of food, and the elements we could see a loss of life up to 90% according to Rawles.

There are any number of things that could bring down all 3 grids and the number one question will be how long?

This threat is very real and becoming informed and knowing your options as well as staying current with reminders such as this video will imho help you to relax, do what you can to be prepared and then deal with whatever may come in a more self empowered way.

The real point here is to "Help Folks get better Prepared" as Rawles in this video presentation :

www.shtfplan.com...




posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 10:06 AM
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Have to run real quick, but will try to make some footnotes of the video presentation for those interested yet do not have the ability to watch/listen to his video. I think it is a great synapses of what we have all been studying and learning as we progressed to this point in history where we are today and moving into the future which seems to be unfolding before our eyes.

Such great info.



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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Rawles usually has some relevant information to impart and this is no exception. He gives great information on gun calibers and ammunition. Bugging out has it's own host of problems but this centers on those bugging in who will try to ride out an emergency situation at home. From my studies the biggest problems people will encounter aside from security and protecting one's own from marauders or government hirelings.

In no order of importance they are:
Water - purification, collection, transport and conservation. Rainwater will be the most readily available source for most. Gutters must be diverted to rain barrels so you will need to have materials for that on hand before the SHTF. Walking to a water source such as a creek or pond increases one's odds of negative encounters. This would be true of any activity that one must leave home to acquire vital needs.

Food - What one doesn't have stocked must be found. Game will be scarce if not entirely depleted even down to squirrels and rabbits. Song birds, insects and rodents will be the most readily available sources of protein. Lawn weeds are often edible and medicinal and should be utilized. The idea of going out and shooting a deer is not going to be a viable option after the first few weeks of a disaster.

Sanitation/Health - Medicines one needs must be stockpiled if possible. This is often impossible for many types of medicine and the only option is veterinary medicines which should be a last resort. There are many medicinal plants and if one has certain issues then there may be a common plant available to help. Do your research on this.
Keeping your body wastes properly disposed is critical. Humanure composting should be everyone's concern and taught to neighbors to keep disease and contamination at a minimum.
Water is important to cleaning many things including clothing. It doesn't need be pure enough to drink but does use considerable amounts. Substitute cleaners can be made with vinegar being among the most useful. It can be stocked or made if one has the right materials on hand. Bleach is another chemical that should be stocked for water purification and cleaning.

Mental health - Staying inside a powerless home with few activities will be very distressing to most people. Keeping a positive attitude with all hell breaking loose or the tedium of doing nothing are equally important.

Of course there are many more facets worthy of discussion concerning survival but it would cover pages simply listing them all and making a short description of each.

Rawles is knowledgeable and worth a listen.



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 11:30 AM
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antar
People are not used to living in a third world standard, from public health and sanitation perspectives, and between lack of food, and the elements we could see a loss of life up to 90% according to Rawles.

There are any number of things that could bring down all 3 grids and the number one question will be how long?

This threat is very real and becoming informed and knowing your options as well as staying current with reminders such as this video will imho help you to relax, do what you can to be prepared and then deal with whatever may come in a more self empowered way.

The real point here is to "Help Folks get better Prepared" as Rawles in this video presentation :

www.shtfplan.com...



You make the "3rd world" sounds like a bad thing. Just like the 1st world has its "bad" parts, so does the 3rd world. However, the "3rd world" parts outside of influence from the "1st world" (namely the West) is quite nice.. Pic related =)




posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Philippines
 


I agree for part of the year I live in a dreaded third world country... If the grid goes down I want to be at the farm overseas and will do everything I can to get there. Actually if and when my USA home sales I am moving to the farm and will return to visit on occasion but.... I am out of here if my plans work out. If I can't get out then I will hunker down in place.. My neighbors are great people and my local law enforcement are helpful so organizing a neighborhood defense would not be a problem around here. Let us all hope that none of this stuff goes down...at least I do. Water we have, ammo we have, food will always be a problem if the grid goes down for a prolonged period... uck!

edit on 26-9-2013 by 727Sky because: ...



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by Philippines
 


Please dont take the OP wrong. I know that 3rd world countries have something to teach many Americans who now face the loss of creature comforts and expected norms.

It would be great to hear more about what you have to share on this subject. I lived in a home that was built about 1,200 years ago when I was younger, the walls and floors were still the same as the day they were put in and cleaner than one could imagine. We did have electricity but not like most modern homes and even though we had a stove I chose to cook in the Kiva stove most of the time.

I have also lived in the outbacks of the Arizona deserts and had an oasis imo.

I have endured many times when in dangerous weather and sub zero freezing temps my life went on as usual although we did go to bed a bit earlier.

So, I would be the last one to think that life would end if the power goes off or food is disrupted. But there are far more people who would freak without modern comforts.



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 04:30 PM
link   

Asktheanimals
Rawles usually has some relevant information to impart and this is no exception. He gives great information on gun calibers and ammunition. Bugging out has it's own host of problems but this centers on those bugging in who will try to ride out an emergency situation at home. From my studies the biggest problems people will encounter aside from security and protecting one's own from marauders or government hirelings.

In no order of importance they are:
Water - purification, collection, transport and conservation. Rainwater will be the most readily available source for most. Gutters must be diverted to rain barrels so you will need to have materials for that on hand before the SHTF. Walking to a water source such as a creek or pond increases one's odds of negative encounters. This would be true of any activity that one must leave home to acquire vital needs.

Food - What one doesn't have stocked must be found. Game will be scarce if not entirely depleted even down to squirrels and rabbits. Song birds, insects and rodents will be the most readily available sources of protein. Lawn weeds are often edible and medicinal and should be utilized. The idea of going out and shooting a deer is not going to be a viable option after the first few weeks of a disaster.

Sanitation/Health - Medicines one needs must be stockpiled if possible. This is often impossible for many types of medicine and the only option is veterinary medicines which should be a last resort. There are many medicinal plants and if one has certain issues then there may be a common plant available to help. Do your research on this.
Keeping your body wastes properly disposed is critical. Humanure composting should be everyone's concern and taught to neighbors to keep disease and contamination at a minimum.
Water is important to cleaning many things including clothing. It doesn't need be pure enough to drink but does use considerable amounts. Substitute cleaners can be made with vinegar being among the most useful. It can be stocked or made if one has the right materials on hand. Bleach is another chemical that should be stocked for water purification and cleaning.

Mental health - Staying inside a powerless home with few activities will be very distressing to most people. Keeping a positive attitude with all hell breaking loose or the tedium of doing nothing are equally important.

Of course there are many more facets worthy of discussion concerning survival but it would cover pages simply listing them all and making a short description of each
.
Rawles is knowledgeable and worth a listen.


Would agree accept game with be there long after we are. This part is totally wrong. Look the United States is huge and the amount of forest and open spaces is so much more than people realize. There are deer and animals in almost every little patch even in the city. People never realize it. Animals are much more resilient than humans are. Very few even have the skill to take an animal anymore, especially without a firearm. No, if you have the skills there will always be food for you.

If you don't you better pray you know someone who does and attach yourself to their hip, they won't be staying around long, they will slip way into the forest and swamp and you won't see them until it is over.

Get a bow, or crossbow and get proficient with it. It will keep you safe and fed when the bullets are gone.

The Bot



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 11:28 PM
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antar
reply to post by Philippines
 


Please dont take the OP wrong. I know that 3rd world countries have something to teach many Americans who now face the loss of creature comforts and expected norms.

It would be great to hear more about what you have to share on this subject. I lived in a home that was built about 1,200 years ago when I was younger, the walls and floors were still the same as the day they were put in and cleaner than one could imagine. We did have electricity but not like most modern homes and even though we had a stove I chose to cook in the Kiva stove most of the time.

I have also lived in the outbacks of the Arizona deserts and had an oasis imo.

I have endured many times when in dangerous weather and sub zero freezing temps my life went on as usual although we did go to bed a bit earlier.

So, I would be the last one to think that life would end if the power goes off or food is disrupted. But there are far more people who would freak without modern comforts.



I'm not offended, no worries =)

As for what I have to share on the subject; it really depends on your location. There is no answer for everyone, but there are some basics to understand and beyond that it's up to the individual to make an effort to learn or not.

The basics are simple: Food, water, shelter... Away from strangers.

Food: Either know what to eat that is on the land around you, or grow/catch/hunt your own. Make sure you carry a metal container to cook with that.

Water: Be in an area where you know the water is clean enough to drink fresh, or safe to boil and drink (no chemicals/pollution etc.) Bring along some empty gallon containers to fetch water with.

Shelter: In the USA it can be very cold at night. A good shelter with blankets and a warm fire are preferable. I would move South to not fight against the cold, but that's me. It also makes another complication for getting food during the winter unless you have it properly stored to last you through it. Pick a place that is not too far of a walk from your water source. A tarp with some para cord is an easy shelter to make.

Fire: You will probably need to be making a fire every day. It is extremely important to have a good tool to make/chop firewood and skin it to dry faster. You also need a way to start the fire if you have no leftover coals. For cooking, I prefer to use 3 stones (not from a river) to support the pot up, with the wood cooking in between the stones.

Bottom line though, long term survival in the wild is probably only viable with experience. The best advice I can give is to pack your bag with what you think you need and walk 6-8 hours into the middle of nowhere and try to live for a few nights. Write down what you should do differently next time and keep trying. As someone else pointed out, if you know of a survivalist, stick to them and watch and learn from everything they do. Buying books/gear is a start, but knowledge/experience surpasses that stuff.

Hope that helps some =)





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