ISOn Update : 24 September 2013 "Eros and ISON moving together in the sky"

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posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by cheesy
 


I noticed in the #2 blog attached that there were 2 lights that popped in and out of the animation "out front" of Ison... did you see it or am I imaging. UFO?




posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 07:31 AM
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great job Cheesy. SnF
edit on 2-10-2013 by Violater1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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Photos of comet ISON from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter -




Based on preliminary analysis of the data, the comet appears to be at the low end of the range of brightness predictions for the observation. As a result, the image isn't visually pleasing but low coma activity is best for constraining the size of the nucleus. This image has a scale of approximately 8 miles (13.3 km) per pixel, larger than the comet, but the size of the nucleus can be estimated based on the typical brightness of other comet nuclei. The comet, like Mars, is currently 241 million kilometers from the Sun. As the comet gets closer to the sun, its brightness will increase to Earth-based observers and the comet may also become intrinsically brighter as the stronger sunlight volatilizes the comet's ices.


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posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 04:57 AM
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Lady_Tuatha
Photos of comet ISON from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter -




omg i wish was not so many pollution in skies here so we could see stars like that.. SO many stars!! amazing foto!!!



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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exiteternity

Lady_Tuatha
Photos of comet ISON from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter -




omg i wish was not so many pollution in skies here so we could see stars like that.. SO many stars!! amazing foto!!!

Those aren't stars. It's mostly camera noise, with ISON faintly in the center.



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


camera noise? how can camera make noise pls? noise is sound is it not? sorry i english nor so gode.
But it looks like big heaven sky with many stars

its beautiful
edit on 3-10-2013 by exiteternity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 09:16 AM
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exiteternity
reply to post by ngchunter
 


camera noise? how can camera make noise pls?

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


oh okay. but why nasa dont have better megapixel or camera they have some moneys



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 10:01 AM
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exiteternity
reply to post by ngchunter
 


oh okay. but why nasa dont have better megapixel or camera they have some moneys

What? It's not something you can magically make "go away" just by throwing money at the problem, and has nothing to do with the number of pixels present. The HiRISE CCDs used by MRO are not designed to take pictures of comets; they weren't designed for extreme thermal cooling to reduce heat-generated noise nor were they designed to perform long exposures of dim objects.



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


oh okay. but i think they should get a better camera, my phone is sgs4 and it dont give such noise, i think its better than that. i saw many pictures on internet with no noise so maybe nasa should use another camera next time



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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exiteternity
reply to post by ngchunter
 


oh okay. but i think they should get a better camera, my phone is sgs4 and it dont give such noise,

You can't capture comet ISON with a phone camera. If you were able to do exposures long enough to do so and tried it, you WOULD get far more noise than even that NASA image shows. Yes, clearer images exist of ISON, including from me, but those images were taken with cameras designed to do long exposures. NASA worked with what they had available at Mars, which is NOT designed for long exposure astrophotography.
edit on 3-10-2013 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


ahaa okey yeah the camera on mars maybe not so good. i see thanks.



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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Hey Guys Check this Out!



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:15 PM
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This is For 1 october..



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by cheesy
 


That looks awesome. Reminds me of the cigar shaped craft near Saturns rings, or the Russian fighter pilot chasing a cylindrical UFO (doco - voice over by Sean Connery if I recall correctly) - both could have been debunked, can't be buggered looking it up.

Any way to legitamise this footage? (source?).

Would be a great and economical method of travel - hitch a ride in close orbit around an object travelling at what...currently ~76,000mph - engines off sit back...

I have no idea about gravitational orbits though - does the parent object need to be spinning to induce a stable orbit? Would the two supposed objects orbiting Ison for any decent amount of time induce a spin on the host object itself? - Maybe someone with more of a grasp on the subject matter could chime in.

And... source?

Cheers Leighthall.
edit on 4-10-2013 by Leighthall because: additional info.



posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 02:56 AM
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Leighthall
reply to post by cheesy
 


That looks awesome. Reminds me of the cigar shaped craft near Saturns rings, or the Russian fighter pilot chasing a cylindrical UFO (doco - voice over by Sean Connery if I recall correctly) - both could have been debunked, can't be buggered looking it up.

Any way to legitamise this footage? (source?).

Would be a great and economical method of travel - hitch a ride in close orbit around an object travelling at what...currently ~76,000mph - engines off sit back...

I have no idea about gravitational orbits though - does the parent object need to be spinning to induce a stable orbit? Would the two supposed objects orbiting Ison for any decent amount of time induce a spin on the host object itself? - Maybe someone with more of a grasp on the subject matter could chime in.

And... source?

Cheers Leighthall.
edit on 4-10-2013 by Leighthall because: additional info.

Yes Ms Violet You Can see the Link here..on my other thread..
www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Oct, 4 2013 @ 09:18 AM
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Leighthall
reply to post by cheesy
 


Would be a great and economical method of travel - hitch a ride in close orbit around an object travelling at what...currently ~76,000mph - engines off sit back...

I have no idea about gravitational orbits though - does the parent object need to be spinning to induce a stable orbit? Would the two supposed objects orbiting Ison for any decent amount of time induce a spin on the host object itself? - Maybe someone with more of a grasp on the subject matter could chime in.

Cheers Leighthall.


The thing to remember is just how incredibly weak the gravity of a comet is. The nucleus is only a few miles across and its density is very low (less than half to one-third of a bucket of dirt). Thus the gravity of a comet like ISON is about the same as a small mountain or a big hill. Do you have any mountains near where you live? Do you feel any gravitational attraction to them, pulling you off of vertical? Yeah, didn't think so...


Thus...


Would be a great and economical method of travel - hitch a ride in close orbit around an object travelling at what...currently ~76,000mph - engines off sit back...


Although spacecraft can get gravitational boosts & course-changes from planet & moon-sized objects, comets just don't have enough mass to get you going.


does the parent object need to be spinning to induce a stable orbit?


Spin is not required for a stable orbit. The spin of an object can affect the orbit of a satellite in a couple of different ways. These affects are measurable, but small.


Would the two supposed objects orbiting Ison for any decent amount of time induce a spin on the host object itself?


Yes, assuming the comet's nucleus is not a perfect sphere (a very safe bet) - but the orbiting object would have to be massive, and it would take a while. Remember that small mountain I was talking about? Imagine how much force - even if applied steadily over time - it would take to start it rotating.

Hope this helps.





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