Best author you ever read?

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posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 02:55 AM
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I say Harry Turtledove is my number one Orson Scott Card at number two and W.E.B Griffin third.




posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 03:16 AM
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reply to post by Czulkang
 


1. J.R.R. Tolkien- Lord of the rings trilogy -fantasy
2. Dean Koontz- I love all his books
-paranormal thrillers/mystery
3. Patricia Cornwell- Scarpetta series- crime thrillers




posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 03:53 AM
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I don't get much time for reading novels, though a few years ago, when I had some spare time, I read Pillars of the Earth. Whilst I have read many great books, this was so well written and evocative, it is worth reading and contains all sorts of life lessons, symbolism, insights and historical references. It is very well researched, both historically and architecturally, both of these I am passionate about. A series was made for TV afterwards which was okay but nothing on the book.

The location is fictional but loosely based on an area near here, Marlborough, Wiltshire, SW England, a place I know well, and set in medieval times. The story is centred around the building of a Cathedral with an interesting mix of characters and spans around 30 years, where there is much development of character and story.

I would certainly recommend the book. Prologue, first chapter and excerpts available here:

ken-follett.com...


In a time of civil war, famine and religious strife, there rises a magnificent Cathedral in Kingsbridge. Against this backdrop, lives entwine: Tom, the master builder, Aliena, the noblewoman, Philip, the prior of Kingsbridge, Jack, the artist in stone and Ellen, the woman from the forest who casts a curse. At once, this is a sensuous and enduring love story and an epic that shines with the fierce spirit of a passionate age.
edit on 22-9-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-9-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 03:56 AM
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Not a big reader myself. But the books that I enjoyed reading the most was by Dan Brown. His books about Robert Langdom are very exciting.

Angels & Demons
The Da Vinci Code
The Lost Symbol
I have yet to read Inferno, but I am looking forward to a time where I can read it in one go



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:04 AM
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Adam Hall, and his Quiller series of spy thrillers.




posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:07 AM
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Robert Jordan:
Wheel of Time series.

Dan Simmons:
Hyperion Cantos



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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Edgar Allen Poe
- Hop Frog
- the Fall of the House of Usher
William Shakespeare
- Macbeth
Stephen King/Richard Bachman
- It
- Dreamcatcher
Dean Koontz
- Strangers
- the Book of Counted Sorrows



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:29 AM
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I'm a sci-fi guy so I love pretty much anything by Michael chrichton. Another favorite of mine are all the books in the halo series (based on the game) written by different authors.
And Mario Puzo has some great books too.
edit on 22-9-2013 by rockintitz because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:36 AM
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Anne McCaffrey, Raymond E Feist, David Eddings and T J Paget although the last is only in E-book.

For her time, Anne McCaffrey was the most advanced and provocative Author changing many previously held beliefs and destroying stereo types like there was no tomorrow. She was a stalwart of Sci-Fi and always will be. Sadly she passed from this mortal realm recently.

P



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:41 AM
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theabsolutetruth
I don't get much time for reading novels, though a few years ago, when I had some spare time, I read Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. Whilst I have read many great books, this was so well written and evocative, it is worth reading and contains all sorts of life lessons, symbolism, insights and historical references. It is very well researched, both historically and architecturally, both of these I am passionate about. A series was made for TV afterwards which was okay but nothing on the book.

The location is fictional but loosely based on an area near here, Marlborough, Wiltshire, SW England, a place I know well, and set in medieval times. The story is centred around the building of a Cathedral with an interesting mix of characters and spans around 30 years, where there is much development of character and story.

I would certainly recommend the book. Prologue, first chapter and excerpts available here:

ken-follett.com...


In a time of civil war, famine and religious strife, there rises a magnificent Cathedral in Kingsbridge. Against this backdrop, lives entwine: Tom, the master builder, Aliena, the noblewoman, Philip, the prior of Kingsbridge, Jack, the artist in stone and Ellen, the woman from the forest who casts a curse. At once, this is a sensuous and enduring love story and an epic that shines with the fierce spirit of a passionate age.
edit on 22-9-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)


If you enjoyed pillars of the earth

You'll love the sequel Worlde Without End

Just as well written and draws you in regardless of how you try to resist it.

Well worth a read

Cody



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by Czulkang
 


Mmm I really do like the inspiring writings of Ron Paul...

But Shakespeare is fantastic, I really do believe so. Beyond that, the writings of Newton are fascinating and also the writings of Lagrange prove to be of fascination to me.



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 05:18 AM
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Homer - The Illiad
Howard Ratcliffe - There's Still Nothing New Under The Sun. (e-book)
edit on 22-9-2013 by occrest because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 06:13 AM
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I have always found Raymond E Feist and David Eddings very easy to read and immediately become drawn into their tales.
I've also enjoyed reading all of Stephen Lawhead and David Gemmell's books.
Stephen Donaldson's books tend to be a bit darker and intense but enjoyable nonetheless.

I thought Julian May's The Saga Of Pliocene Exile was excellent but I couldn't get into any of her other series.

Other author's of note are J.V Jones and Tad Williams.

I don't read as much Science Fiction but I really like reading Greg Bear, Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle.

Obviously Heinlein, Frank Herbert and Isaac Assimov deserve all the recognition that has been offered them as does J.R.R. Tolkein whose books I have read over and over again.



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 06:28 AM
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reply to post by Czulkang
 


Gary Jennings-Aztec,the Jouneyer...super immersive,mind altering books.

Anything by Robert R McCammon-One of the greatest storytellers I have come across.
Swan Song,and the Mathew Corbett novels by McCammon are awesome reads.

You will not be able to put down those authors IMO.



Some other excellent authors mentioned in my signature thread-"What books rock your world?"



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by cody599
 


Hi, I read that after, it was good too.

EDIT: removed smiley because the icky nauseous green face thing looked like it was a 'sick' face. I hope those aren't the new smileys, those suck. Yellow is a better colour for smiley faces.
edit on 22-9-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by Czulkang
 


Terry Brooks - read everything he wrote. The Word and The Void trilogy is fantastic. I would love to have someone check it out and tell me what they think.
Early Stephen King and his Gunslinger Saga. Amazing work.
George R.R. Martin - incredible depth and layers. After reading his books i felt he makes most authors look like amateurs.
Jim Butcher love the Dresden Files books a little on the light reading side but still great fun and they are a quick reads



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by Rainbowresidue
 





3. Patricia Cornwell- Scarpetta series- crime thrillers


Highly recommend. Fascinating woman in real life too. Doctor, lawyer, Indian chief. I sometimes find her writing style a bit odd, but really great books to read on a rainy day.

I keep trying to get people to read the Wool series by Hugh Howey, but no one will listen even though he has been fairly popular online and they may make a movie. Only sells e-books as I recall, and keeps the price very low as he self publishes. I'm not going to say it's some mind blowing reading that will make you change as a person or anything, but the characters, the subject and the twists are just awesome. I read all of the books in a weekend. I would suggest going into them blind, after the first book if you're not hooked there's something wrong with you.



Wool is a series of science fiction novellas (and is also available as a single novel) by American writer Hugh Howey.[1] Film rights to the story have been sold to 20th Century Fox,[2] with director Ridley Scott and Steve Zaillian expressing interest in the film adaptation.



Plot[edit source]

The story of Wool takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth.[10] Humanity clings to survival in the Silos, subterranean cities extending over one hundred stories beneath the surface. The Silo's mystery is eventually revealed by the end of book five, with First Shift being a prequel to the series.



Wool initially follows the story of Holston, Silo-18's sheriff. Holston spends the novel processing and investigating the circumstances surrounding his wife's death. Holston's investigation of the Silo and the secrets it holds ultimately serves as a catalyst that begins to impact the lives of various characters and sets up the action for the rest of the series.


I wouldn't even read my link to Wikipedia if you want to read the series.

Wikipedia

Howey also has some other fascinating novellas and another decent series. Seriously check him out if you like SciFi or a good read. I feel the same way about Wool as I do Firefly.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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arthur c clark.

carl sagun

h.g.wells .

jules verne .

john norman gor author



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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Anne rice, Young Stephen King, Robert Ludlum, tracey hickman, margaret weis (dragonlance chronicles)

Tom Clancy (red storm rising) Frank Herbert (dune)

those are some of the best no specific order. Never heard of them read one of their books, I dont think you'll be sorry.



posted on Sep, 24 2013 @ 05:22 AM
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- Bishop Sheen (Life of Christ)
- Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)
- Ray Bradbury (Martian Chronicles)
- Edgar Allen Poe (everything he ever wrote)
- Kim Harrison (Rachael Morgan series)
- Anne Rice (all excellent reading)
- Stephen King (Talisman)
- Mario Puzo (Godfather)
edit on 9/24/2013 by FlyersFan because: (no reason given)





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