Can FBI Collect iPhone 5S Fingerprint Data?

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posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 02:06 AM
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Mnemicrsl
The answer is NO. The iphone 5s doesn't actually store your fingerprint. It scans your finger subdermal, then creates an algorhythm according to specific grooves of said finger. Up to 5 fingers.
edit on 21-9-2013 by Mnemicrsl because: (no reason given)

How does it remember the algorithm? If the algorithm is basically a form of encryption... well, then it can be decrypted.

I'm seriously having a hard time believing anyone is falling for this. But nevertheless...




posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 02:21 AM
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They cant,therefore they will and probably already are!



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by NthOther
 


From what i understand each code is unique ro each phone..im trying to be optomistic about this..... Oh hell, they already have my fingerprint down at the DMV. Theres no way out of this.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 03:01 AM
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Everyone is saying no, but the nsa has collected stuff out of our phones we can't even imagine.
I wouldn't take one of those things for free.
I am actually vested and bonded, do my fingerprints are out there.Even so, the
invasion into our personal lives is over the top.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 03:02 AM
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reply to post by Mnemicrsl
 


What dmv is this?
They don't fingerprint us at the dmv in nyc.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 03:12 AM
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reply to post by Mnemicrsl
 


I can't see each individual device having a unique algorithm for transforming the image into a string of data.

It would have to be universal therefore the algorithm would no doubt be available to government departments who would then be able to transform that data back in to an image.

Just my completely uneducated guess. Could be very wrong....



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 03:13 AM
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I'd be more worried about the thumbprint @ Disney World being kept on file (supposed to be deleted on a regular basis).
As if.
And I am Canadian who visited there 3 years back and required to give it on entry for re-entry later on.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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They claim it will be encrypted and stored locally on the device in a "hidden place", by using the word secret they mean they cant tell you before then hackers would know where to look - but if the CIA asked, do you think apple would have a choice?

If its on the device or on the cloud, it CAN BE FOUND.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


I'll dare bet that American authorities already have the technology in place to retrieve and decrypt this kind of 'security'. All they need now is for the 'mule' company to roll out the sales spiel to convince us all why we should use it.

Personally, I would never volunteer my dabs to anyone/anything until I see a charge-sheet with my name on it.
edit on 21-9-2013 by doobydoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 04:51 AM
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Regarding phone security, there are already plug and play forensic tools to rip data from phones and sims. They're expensive, but a child could use them.

The fingerprints ... why would a powerful government agency need those to frame you? You will read about yourself resisting arrest in the after life, or in court with six officers all saying you pulled a gun on them whilst flushing drugs down the toilet, pouring from material that conveniently doesn't take well to prints in the first place.

I think the best approach is to not treat your phone like a secure personal data storage device.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 04:57 AM
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reply to post by Pinke
 


Its not the framing or whatever people dislike, heres one scenario.

You buy an iphone 5s and you put your finger print on and you are happy no one in the world can access your iphone (which may come back to bite you if you need to let a friend use it without you being there, cant just give them the pin)

Your finger print is put on the CIA database some how.

Your print is now matched to all crimes in the USA and flagged for being in the location of a crime you had nothing to do with as you where at the crime scene a week before.

You now must spend your money and time to prove you are not the criminal. Rather than the police having a reason to put you at the crime scene with more evidence than the simple fact your finger was in the area at some point in time.
edit on 21-9-2013 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 05:13 AM
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Biigs
reply to post by Pinke
 

Its not the framing or whatever people dislike, heres one scenario.

Oh! That makes sense! Though I'm not sure it will be a thing for now.

There is something affectionately called the CSI Effect where the idea is that as time has gone on and technology has increased, juries have demanded more evidence to put forward a conviction. It's called the CSI Effect since some theorists blame it on television programs about cops and detectives. On one hand it means a jury will demand more, on the other there has been cases (of certain types in particular) where a jury will place strong emphasis on say DNA evidence for no real good reason. One case had a person behind bars for around 10 years because the judge disallowed a DNA test on appeal.

Still, forensics is under more and more scrutiny as it is, so I think it would take a bit more of a cultural and legal precedent shift to get this happening for most crimes.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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in a word..

yes..

all smart phones are able to do this ..



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:11 AM
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NthOther
How does it remember the algorithm? If the algorithm is basically a form of encryption... well, then it can be decrypted.

You don't need to store the whole fingerprint to identify a person. If another fingerprint is processed with the same algorithm and the results match, then it's you. It's like digital signature. So the notion that fingerprints are not stored as raw data does not make any difference with respect to identification.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Uhhhh. What do you think? Its a no brainer and has nothing to do with the safety of your phone or your identity. There is an NSA-Ai System in Utah that needs to be filled.

No mystery.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by NthOther
 


That is exactly what I wonder all the time, newer generations has been targeted from birth to accept a totalitarian grab of anything that under the constitution is call privacy.

And is no need for laws or bills to force the people to do it, is been done very willingly under the umbrella of new gadgets, toys and technological advances.

This is any corporate dictatorship wet dreams come true, making money from your privacy with data mining while taking away any privacy you think you have this days.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


I don't think it is a huge deal. For almost any job I have ever applied for I had to have a background check, including finger prints. So, they already have them. As long as I do not commit a crime, it is not a big deal. I am not a criminal and do not commit crimes, so it is not a big deal. I have nothing to hide. I am a hard working law abiding citizen who is really boring. They can have 20 of my fingerprints and all of toe prints too, if they want them.

Why would the FBI commit personnel and time and money gathering fingerprints of the users of I-phone?

What are they collecting them for?

Why would they want them?

Answer those questions and I may feel differently.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:39 AM
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I don't think the question is do they read it....but how often.
2nd line



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 09:51 AM
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Well I found out some downfalls when it comes to the new fingerprinting technology and something people here has not even considered, actually no even me.


In everyday life, things are even worst. You usually use your hands for different tasks and you usually touch different types of materials. Small portions of the objects you touch accumulate on the skin of your finger. When you touch the fingerprint sensor, you deposit these material on its surface. Additionally, your skin produces sweat (a combination of water and different types of salts) and the sebum (a oily/waxy substance our body produces). When you touch the surface of a fingerprint sensor, the mix of the sweat, sebum and any substance accumulate during your daily activities become a killer combination for the sensor surface that speeds up the destruction of its surface… If you search for the specifications of a CMOS fingerprint device, you will find a number representing the lifetime of a device. That number is expressed in number of touches (before it completely dies). That number is provided in ideal conditions of usage and in a normal operating environment of temperature and humidity. But remember where you normally use your iPhone. You keep it in your “dirty” pockets, you leave it on different surfaces, and in humid and hot or cold and dry environments. Sometimes water drops on it or you forget it in your car under the sun. All these factors stress the working conditions of the sensor surface and contribute to speeding up its decay process.


So it seems that the new fingerprinting technology in this case the I phone 5s could indeed no be so reliable or good as been promised.

An in-depth look at fingerprint sensor technology amid ‘iPhone 5S’ rumors

9to5mac.com...



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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NIce Kitty ... Domo ..... If you think about it if they can get your thumb print off the glass screen covering then why couldn't they also get the rest of your prints one at a time; stored in your phone by a spy app? And remember the third party rule in privacy ..... if a third party (company) has it ... anyone with clearance or access has it too .... ...

and even if you opt out the phone still a capabilities to do it... doesn't mean they still do not do it if you learn anything from history .....





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