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Game changing sensor from Raytheon

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posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Raytheon has introduced the "Hyperspectral" sensor for the Global Hawk, and it's being called a game changer.

Northrop Grumman, who makes the Global Hawk has said that the new sensor could be fitted under the aircraft on a "universal payload adapter", which at the same time would increase the number of sensors fitted to the aircraft.

The new sensor is an amazing piece of equipment. From altitude the Global Hawk will be able to detect holes dug and refilled, if a vehicle has driven through sand and dirt, and even the humidity and temperature of plants can be measured. Certain wavelengths can be read by the sensor that will tell if there is something disturbing the environment around the plants, to allow NASA to get a good feel for what's happening in certain areas.


It can track ships at sea, sense the slightest change in the dirt and even take the temperatures of forests and crops. It’s the giant Global Hawk spy drone from U.S. manufacturer Northrop Grumman — and it’s making the world a very dangerous place for terrorists, insurgents and international criminals … and a better place for scientists.

But that doesn’t mean the Global Hawk is without its detractors. The U.S. Air Force, in particular, has mixed feelings about the drone — for reasons that are not entirely clear but could have something to do with an even more capable secret Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

The Global Hawk, also known by its military designation RQ-4, is a high-flying, long-endurance remotely-piloted plane that can stay aloft for more than 30 hours straight, following GPS waypoints and responding to commands relayed via satellite by operators on the ground.

medium.com...




posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 

There will be no burying of your jewelry this time.



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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I might as well just give the NSA all my data.
What's the point?



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 03:58 PM
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There is no hiding from Raytheon.
Disturbed dirt? Plants with the dew shook off
can give you away? I wonder if they'd
take care of a certain possum that's been
a pest lately? Couple waypoints and some coordinates
and blammo!!! No more playing possum.



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 04:00 PM
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Thanks Zaphod

If that sensor technology is as good as they claim its probably already being used on another less obvious platform (or more than one).

Its interesting they are trying to use the sensor to PR on behalf of the global hawk. Probably still smarting from the German rejection.



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by justwokeup
 


As has been mentioned before, at least twice, the USAF has classified platforms that can do the Global Hawk mission that are more capable. I'm wiling to bet that this sensor has flown on that platform.



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I saw that as well..



There could be a good reason for the flying branch’s reticence. Flight Global reported in April that senior officials believe that Lockheed Martin’s U-2 spy plane and other “classified platforms” had the ability to take over the Global Hawk’s intelligence, reconnaissance, surveillance missions—and do it better.


other classified platforms..... hrmmmmmm...
The next blackbird....



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


A couple of years ago NG filed for a patent for a new UAV design. It's been dubbed the Super Sentinel, and appears to be a larger, stealthier, armed version of the RQ-170. There is also a report of a photographer at TTR that saw what he thought was a Sentinel, but the intake, and the skin were both different from the Sentinel. There are also rumors of something flying in the desert for at least a couple years.



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 03:15 AM
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If it can detect ground disturbances? this may be a way of starting to counter the threat from IED's? depends totally on if we could get enough of them airborne and available though i suppose?



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 09:50 AM
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solidshot
If it can detect ground disturbances? this may be a way of starting to counter the threat from IED's? depends totally on if we could get enough of them airborne and available though i suppose?


Flight

In a heavily redacted justification of its decision to award Aero Mech Engineering a $13.1 million contract to deliver the Sand Dragon anti-IED unmanned aircraft system for evaluation in Afghanistan, the US Air Force Research Laboratory provides some detail on this rapid-reaction program.

Sand Dragon will use Aero Mech's Fury B flying-wing UAV, which AFRL's Rapid Reaction Office concluded was the only air vehicle that could meet the requirements for runway independence and long endurance and be ready to begin a 150-day operational utility assessment in Afghanistan before the end of 2010.


Sand Dragon been hunting via multi spectral for years. This sounds like it got some real hardcore backing and went large.



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 01:29 PM
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greencmp
reply to post by Zaphod58
 

There will be no burying of your jewelry this time.


bury them under your compost heap in a plastic container
infrared and EM based scanning dealt with




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