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Interesting SOHO image can any explain what has caused it.

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posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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When entering this information on the Solar Heliospheric Observatory below



In movie mode

This was observed.


Just wondering if any can explain what can cause this glitch in the movie and SOHO images?

sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov...

Thanks in advance
edit on 9/9/13 by ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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The sun releases high energy particles that often affect the camera and sensors sometimes so severe (during a CME or a X-ray flare) it causes a particle storm

They show up as extra little dots across the field of view and do not last long typically into subsequent images.
edit on 9-9-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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I Think the lens might have received some damage. If you keep seeing the soho videos, you can still see stars passing through the "anomaly", so it is like a watermark on the lens caused by some exterior damage.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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bugs birds dust weather balloons chinese laterns ...


sorry had to do to that


interesting tho.. hope ya get an answer.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:37 PM
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Suspicious Observer explained this in the video uploaded for September 9th this morning.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by abeverage
 




reply to post by hades84
 


Both sound like plausible suggestions
1 appreciates your support


NAMASTE*******

reply to post by thishereguy
 


Interesting


reply to post by whatnext21
 


Thanks for the link whatnext21, shall take a look...

edit on 9/9/13 by ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:43 PM
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whatnext21
Suspicious Observer explained this in the video uploaded for September 9th this morning.


AH! I didn't see the burn in shadow image and assumed the OP meant the particle images.

This is the correct answer.

Ever stare a bright light then look away and get that purple spot? Something like that!

Whenever an object is too bright for too long a CCD (optical sensor like a camera) has the chance of getting a negative image burned into it. This is what has happened here and that video link explains this.



edit on 9-9-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by ophiuchus 13
 


It's been there since 14:55 UTC on September 3, and it is still there 6 days later, and has not moved from its position in the image frame while the SOHO spacecraft itself has moved (as evidenced by the background stars moving)...

...Therefore, I would say it is some sort of image artifact (a data glitch or something, or maybe something in the camera), and is not really "out there is space". If it was "out there is space", it would not remain stationary over 6 days while the SOHO spacecraft moved.

As to what sort of data glitch, I couldn't tell you.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by abeverage
 




This is the correct answer.

Not really. Not exactly.
It was caused by the background subtraction algorithm, part of the automatic image processing system. In order to make details of the corona and CMEs more visible a "background mask" is applied to the images. The process is called background subtraction and uses a "stack" of past images to create a brightness map in order to remove bright areas that don't change over time.

The dark spot is where the planet Mercury was a couple of weeks ago. The spot will remain until the subtraction mask is updated.




edit on 9/9/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Well that figures I stand corrected.

Thanks Phage.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 



reply to post by Phage
 


Your clarity on the subject makes sense Phage
Caught the attention when scanning the SOHO images.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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There appears to be lighter and darker splotches in other places. Maybe higher or lower densities of plasma that escaped? I'm just guessing, but I have seen those before on images, I don't know what they actually are.

Oh wow, I like phages answer, it sounds professional.
edit on 9-9-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Yes rickymouse the shared explanations do seem to make sense thus far.
Figured 1 would share with the ATS community/mind states to see if some came to similar conclusions


NAMASTE*******



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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Here is one I would like an explanation on:






posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by Darkblade71
 


Interesting, here is one of my favs





posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 06:51 PM
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Phage
reply to post by abeverage
 




This is the correct answer.

Not really. Not exactly.
It was caused by the background subtraction algorithm, part of the automatic image processing system. In order to make details of the corona and CMEs more visible a "background mask" is applied to the images. The process is called background subtraction and uses a "stack" of past images to create a brightness map in order to remove bright areas that don't change over time.

The dark spot is where the planet Mercury was a couple of weeks ago. The spot will remain until the subtraction mask is updated.




edit on 9/9/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)

That's interesting because it might explain the image I saw of a bright object, on C3 (a fast mover) that passed above right to left, low north of the Sun at the same time as the last Comet dissolved into the Sun, that object had no coma. Hang on though, that can't be right unless there is a similar dusky image left behind, a small darker area there somewhere.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 01:59 AM
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reply to post by ophiuchus 13
 


I found this Vid dated 21 August 2013 by BPEarthWatch YouTube Channel it could be the same as what you are showing here.

Hidden Planet Found/Next to Earth!


Love and harmony
Whateva



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 02:54 AM
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reply to post by Whateva69
 


in relation to this OP Whateva69

www.abovetopsecret.com...

debris is the current explanation discussed.

Nice share


NAMASTE*******



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 10:10 AM
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Phage
reply to post by abeverage
 




This is the correct answer.

Not really. Not exactly.
It was caused by the background subtraction algorithm, part of the automatic image processing system. In order to make details of the corona and CMEs more visible a "background mask" is applied to the images. The process is called background subtraction and uses a "stack" of past images to create a brightness map in order to remove bright areas that don't change over time.

The dark spot is where the planet Mercury was a couple of weeks ago. The spot will remain until the subtraction mask is updated.




edit on 9/9/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)

Bingo, beat me to the punch. Looks to me like they used the images from the first 12 hours on August 21st.




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