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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake - PART 2

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posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 01:43 AM
link   

Human0815
reply to post by pheonix358
 


Tepco is just a Tool,
used by People like you (and me) as a Provider for a smooth Living!

Tepco is living because of People like you (and me),
you delegated your Responsibility to them!

We need to see how you act and how you are living
to decide if you are living in Compliance with your
demanded Ethic or if you are just ranting!

And one more Time:
the "secrecy Law" have nothing to do with the Accident in Fukushima!


Oh I see, Tepco took shortcuts for profit. Tepco is in another country. In the end though, it is all my fault.

Um, NO just NO.

It is the fault of the Board of Directors.

That has to be the most silly argument I have heard in a long time.

Just NO!

P



(post by Human0815 removed for a manners violation)

posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 05:06 AM
link   
Anti-Nuclear lost in the Tokyo Election,
only ca. 30% of the People here participated.

The Democratic Society is gone because of the Lies of the / every Government
but also because the People are selfish, more selfish and un-responsible
than ever!

A bad day.

A Democratic Society need Participants!

Let us bow our Headz and accept the decision of the Majority?
Muh!

:Cow:

Edit: He just gave a Info:

"I saw Fukushima and it was horrible but i am not the Person
who abandon Nuclear Energy, instead we need to reduce our
consume of Energy here in Tokyo and increase the Green
Energy from 6% up to at least 20%"


edit on 9-2-2014 by Human0815 because: edit



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 05:38 AM
link   
NHK Documentary on Water "Leaks"



Here's the link on Vimeo that has better audio:
vimeo.com...

- Purple Chive
edit on 9-2-2014 by Purplechive because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 06:35 AM
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Artic Frozen Ground

Whew....I don't think freezing the ground around Fuku is a good idea. Any geologists on this thread able to elaborate on frozen ground implications at Fuku?

www.fws.gov...

- Purple Chive



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 06:47 AM
link   
reply to post by Purplechive
 


Great Documentary from the last Weeks.

The Vimeo Version works best.

Sometimes it is very helpful to watch Japanese TV!

Regards and Domo

Edit: it is not right to compare the Arctic with a artificial frozen Area
like we know from Construction Sites.
edit on 9-2-2014 by Human0815 because: edit



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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Purplechive
TEPCO Does Not Lie...They Just Massively Screw Up

Yeah right...

enenews.com... ocean-160000-times-limit-actual-levels-had-exceed

www3.nhk.or.jp...

- Purple Chive


Well if it's on enenews, it must be true.




posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 01:43 PM
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Do Hexagon around Fuku...Not Rectangle

TEPCO...you gotta get outside the box.

- Purple Chive



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 09:56 PM
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Alekto

Purplechive
TEPCO Does Not Lie...They Just Massively Screw Up

Yeah right...

enenews.com... ocean-160000-times-limit-actual-levels-had-exceed

www3.nhk.or.jp...

- Purple Chive


Well if it's on enenews, it must be true.



If you actually check out the links that enenews provides, they usually source it to another site that you can verify. You can't arbitrarily dismiss the site.... that would catamount to saying that every source on enenews is somehow tainted because enenews used a story from there. They do post some very good linked info, you just have to wade through everything to find it.

I have used stuff I found on enenews quite a few times.... but for a source, I link the original site, not enenews.

Its kinda like saying everything on Enenews is made up so therefore everything Tepco says must be true. You have to dig to find the truth, but the truth is out there..... now I sound like the X-Files lol
edit on R062014-02-09T22:06:55-06:00k062Vpm by RickinVa because: (no reason given)

edit on R072014-02-09T22:07:13-06:00k072Vpm by RickinVa because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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Ruling party-backed candidate wins Tokyo race


TOKYO (AP) - Yoichi Masuzoe, a former health minister backed by Japan's ruling party, easily won Tokyo's gubernatorial election Sunday, defeating two candidates who had promised to end nuclear power.

The ballot was widely seen as a test for Japan's public opinion on atomic power in a nation shaken by the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Masuzoe, 65, was backed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who wants to restart Japan's 50 nuclear reactors.

Masuzoe received 2.1 million votes, more than the combined total of the two anti-nuclear candidates, who finished second and third. With the city cleaning up from a rare snowstorm, turnout was a low 46.1 percent, down from 62.6 in the previous vote.

The anti-nuclear candidates, human rights lawyer Kenji Utsunomiya and former Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, advocated an immediate end to nuclear power.

"The Fukushima disaster has left me without words, but reducing our dependence on nuclear power needs to be done gradually," Masuzoe said after his victory.

Source

Muh!

What should we do when the majority want something different than us?



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 05:20 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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Many foreigners in Fukushima fled after crisis, news reporting questioned


SENDAI (Kyodo) -- Many foreign nationals living in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the March 2011 nuclear crisis say they relocated either to their home countries or within Japan, according to a survey by a nonprofit group.

The Fukushima International Association said its survey also showed that they were troubled by the difference in media coverage between Japan and their home countries and that most of them relied on TV rather than radio because of language barriers.

Of the 70 foreigners who were living in the prefecture in late 2012 and interviewed by the association, 51 people (73 percent) said they evacuated. Of them, 29 left Japan for their home countries, while 21 moved out of the prefecture and one within the prefecture.

While simple comparisons are hard to make, this represents a disproportionately high ratio of evacuees when compared with the entire population of the prefecture.

According to the prefectural government, up to around 164,200 people relocated after the crisis, in May 2012, accounting for 8 percent of the overall population of 2 million.


Mainichi

Japan pushes to restart mothballed nuclear reactors


The Japanese government is scheduled to release its new basic energy plan before the end of March, with a document expected to identify nuclear energy as a key component of the national energy mix.

The only problem with this commitment to atomic energy is the fact that every single one of the 48 nuclear reactors across the country is offline at present, with utility companies awaiting the approval of local authorities and communities before they can resume the generation of power.

On March 11, the nation will mark the three-year anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake, the worst natural disaster to befall the country in living memory and trigger a devastating tsunami that destroyed the Fukushima Dai-Ichi power station.
Horrified at the crisis at the nuclear plant - a situation ranked second in history behind the Chernobyl disaster in a nation that previously prided itself on the safety of its industrial sector - environmental activists and members of the public have attempted to block the resumption of nuclear power generation.

They argue that, given the Fukushima crisis, it would be irresponsible to return to atomic energy in a nation so prone to earthquakes and other natural disasters and that the utilities are simply not able to guarantee that a similar accident will not happen again in the future.
New governor, new attitude

Source
edit on 11-2-2014 by Human0815 because: 2 in to 1

edit on 11-2-2014 by Human0815 because: Formato



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 10:14 AM
link   

Human0815
Many foreigners in Fukushima fled after crisis, news reporting questioned


SENDAI (Kyodo) -- Many foreign nationals living in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the March 2011 nuclear crisis say they relocated either to their home countries or within Japan, according to a survey by a nonprofit group.

The Fukushima International Association said its survey also showed that they were troubled by the difference in media coverage between Japan and their home countries and that most of them relied on TV rather than radio because of language barriers.

Of the 70 foreigners who were living in the prefecture in late 2012 and interviewed by the association, 51 people (73 percent) said they evacuated. Of them, 29 left Japan for their home countries, while 21 moved out of the prefecture and one within the prefecture.

While simple comparisons are hard to make, this represents a disproportionately high ratio of evacuees when compared with the entire population of the prefecture.

According to the prefectural government, up to around 164,200 people relocated after the crisis, in May 2012, accounting for 8 percent of the overall population of 2 million.


Mainichi

Japan pushes to restart mothballed nuclear reactors


The Japanese government is scheduled to release its new basic energy plan before the end of March, with a document expected to identify nuclear energy as a key component of the national energy mix.

The only problem with this commitment to atomic energy is the fact that every single one of the 48 nuclear reactors across the country is offline at present, with utility companies awaiting the approval of local authorities and communities before they can resume the generation of power.

On March 11, the nation will mark the three-year anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake, the worst natural disaster to befall the country in living memory and trigger a devastating tsunami that destroyed the Fukushima Dai-Ichi power station.
Horrified at the crisis at the nuclear plant - a situation ranked second in history behind the Chernobyl disaster in a nation that previously prided itself on the safety of its industrial sector - environmental activists and members of the public have attempted to block the resumption of nuclear power generation.

They argue that, given the Fukushima crisis, it would be irresponsible to return to atomic energy in a nation so prone to earthquakes and other natural disasters and that the utilities are simply not able to guarantee that a similar accident will not happen again in the future.
New governor, new attitude

Source
edit on 11-2-2014 by Human0815 because: 2 in to 1

edit on 11-2-2014 by Human0815 because: Formato




Interesting. As a foreigner myself in Tokyo, I can only speak for my immediate friends. Of course, I don't live in Fukushima so had that been the case I would have had to give serious consideration to at least evacuating the prefecture until I got the all clear.

Anyway, I digress.

Of my friends, only one guy I know left Japan permanently. He was under family pressure to leave. Certainly contradicts the flag 'Fly-Jin' some Japanese people unfairly labeled those who chose to leave.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 10:23 AM
link   
reply to post by Alekto
 


Gosh, my whole Family was in Panic Mode,
understandable when you saw the Reports.

For me, at that Time, the Tsunami and all the Aftershock was much
more horrible (PTSD from Thailand)
but when Reactor 3 blowed up i knew we must go, now!

At the Airport it was really apocalyptic, a nightmare.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Human0815
 





but when Reactor 3 blowed up i knew we must go, now!


Here is a video from late April 2011, Arnie Gunderson talking about what could have happened with R3. The problem is that the prompt criticality he talks about is not possible by the mechanism he suggests, but the damage seems to show that there must have been some kind of powerful explosion. What I suggest is that a micro-nuke was deployed, a back-pack nuke as they are sometimes called. This would fit with my belief that the whole thing was a setup, and that this is why they will not allow an examination by any independant third party scientists, they would figure out that something didn't add up if the cause was supposedly just a hydrogen explosion. There's more to the Fukushima event than we will ever know about.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 07:56 PM
link   
reply to post by GaryN
 


I have done a search page for all the instances of "Hydrogen Explosion" (case insensitive) in the first Fuku thread posts. Go down to the bottom of the linked index page and you will see the link to the list there. There are quite a few obviously.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:23 PM
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I haven't read this whole thread, but here is my uneducated opinion:
No global Fukushima doom.
Some local tragedies and sadness, but most of Japan will survive, and the planet as a whole will survive.
It has been almost three years since the tragedy now, and we have yet to see mass death.

I am calling it: "Doom over."

On another website that I will not name, the ignorant, bigoted owner will ban anyone expressing this opinion.

I could be wrong. I hope I'm right.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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The thing is - radiation poisoning is not very often an immediate death sentence. Obviously it does kill you if you are exposed to close radiation or if you ingest it, then it is by definition close to you. Often, it kind-of 'gets you' over a period of time, so 3 years is nothing when talking radiation half-lives etc. For example, it takes a while for the radioactive isotopes to work their way through the food chain after being deposited in the ocean or after being deposited on the grass and trees.

There is undoubtedly a case against TEPCO for feeding the whole world a bunch of lies and disinfo. What the reason for this may be, no-one will even know, but what we do know is that they have made erroneous statements, which have been passed off as mistakes, and they have stopped the international scientific community from being as effective as they could be in trying to find a solution or helping to come up with alternative ideas.

This is a disaster which is breaking new ground and no-one knows what to do when the cores of 3 reactors are in the Earth under the reactor buildings. However, it is potentially affecting the whole world and I dont think anyone would argue that point. This kind of event of this magnitude requires us all to pull together to fix it if indeed we can, so any heel-dragging by TEPCO or the Japanese government must be a reason for the rest of us to be concerned.

We all hope that the situation somehow manages to be fixed too.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


I know this is a Conspiracy Forum but i would be very
surprised if we find "something special" in F'Shima!
(like a Bomb making Facility)

And the Idea of a nuclear Bomb sounds fascinating
but is a Illusion.

It is just a Idea, just a Way for some People to explain
the Accident for/ to them self because they do not
understand the Happenings in that Plant!



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 03:15 AM
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Tepco hid record-level radiation data last July


Tokyo Electric Power Co. did not tell the public until recently that massively high levels of radiation were found in groundwater collected last July at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, even though the utility was aware of the data that month, according to sources.

Tepco released the data on Feb. 6 showing that the groundwater contained a record 5 million becquerels per liter of radioactive strontium-90.

When Tepco reported the data to the Nuclear Regulation Authority last week, it initially claimed that it had only recently compiled the data, NRA sources said.

However, the embattled utility later corrected the timing, apparently showing that it had withheld the record readings, the sources said.

The withholding of the radiation data looks to be the latest in a long line of missteps for the utility, experts said.

Regulators are expected to demand a detailed explanation from Tepco, the sources said.

Japan Times

'Fukushima:
The Story Of A Nuclear Disaster' Reveals New Insight Into Japanese Catastrophe



The story of the 2011 catastrophe at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant unfolds in a new book-length account from the Union of Concerned Scientists, a nonprofit advocacy group.

“Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster” (The New Press) was penned by David Lochbaum, head of the UCS’s Nuclear Safety Project (and a nuclear engineer for 17 years); Edwin Lyman, a senior scientist in UCS’s Global Security Program; and journalist Susan Stranahan, who led the Philadelphia Inquirer’s coverage of the Three Mile Island Accident in Dauphin, Pennsylvania (which earned the paper the 1980 Pulitzer Prize in local general reporting).

Lochbaum and his coauthors weave a fast-paced, detailed narrative that moves like a thriller -- but with the consequences painfully real, and the potential for a sequel hanging on the horizon.

“Fukushima Daiichi unmasked the weaknesses of nuclear power plant design and the long-standing flaws in operations and regulatory oversight,” the authors write. “Although Japan must share the blame, this was not a Japanese nuclear accident; it was a nuclear accident that just happened to have occurred in Japan. The problems that led to the disaster at Fukushima Daiichi exist wherever reactors operate.”

Source for Book tip
edit on 12-2-2014 by Human0815 because: 2-1



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