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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake - PART 2

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posted on May, 4 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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originally posted by: matadoor

Oh yeah, it will be millions of years to recover, but the heat is something the earth is used to dealing with. Radiation, made by man? Yeah, not so much.


Id have to respectfully disagree that the world can handle heat. The whole Permian Triassic event was caused by heating of the tundra and Arctic Ocean which in turn released the methane in both permafrost and hydrates which in turn produced more heat. This then set the world on a path that would eliminate 95% of life on this planet. The only difference now is that we have added a radioactive and toxic pollution component to extinction event #6.

It's all bad.

But I agree. In the long run the radiation will probably hamper recovery more than anything else.




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: zworld

rezlooper presented an excellent series of informative threads with regards to methane and other gaseous substances.
I recommend a looksee.

with regards to the browns gas and other possible remediation systems, it would be fascinating to have some benchmark values on their effectiveness. taking stock of the amounts of radionucleides now airborne, seaborne and in the ground, it seems the decision makers are not stepping into this arena. i read last night on a blog (will supply the link if requested)
that cobalt 60 transuranic, has made itself apparent by embedding itself in all steel structures around the fuku plant. i'm thinking of the water containers. how long before these fail due to wigner, oxidisation (corrosion) accelerated. there was also a statement that they were considering evaporation of the stored contaminated water. with the amounts of tritium it is holding, i think that would be another hammer blow. the other option that was mooted was to discharge it into the pacific.
those in charge need to pull fingers out and walk on new ground. if one of the machines in the prior link was effective, it wouldn't take too much effort to upscale it to handle the as yet unquantified amounts of material simmering away in the hot zone.
f.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 09:10 AM
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well, if at first you don't succeed.......

nuclearstreet.com... 50501.aspx#.VUjNiyFViko

"Third Robotic Probe To Inspect Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2

A third robotic probe in development for the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning has gotten its assignment at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, which was crippled by a tsunami event that followed a massive earthquake in March 2011.

Two robotic probes have already been sent through an access pipe to photograph the melted fuel in the plant's No. 1 reactor. Both were abandoned after a few hours of service, as they failed due to high levels of radioactivity in the reactor vessel. While inside the Unit 1 containment vessel, the crawling, shape-changing probes also recorded radioactivity and temperature.

The third robot, affixed with an LED light and a camera, will be sent through a different route to inspect Unit 2 this summer. It will be tasked with filming the melted fuel, which is presumed to have fallen to the bottom of the containment vessel. The footage should help plant TEPCO arrive at design specifications required for the robotic assembly that will remove the fuel from the damaged reactor vessel, Asia One News reported."

More at the link....

M



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: zworld

originally posted by: matadoor

Oh yeah, it will be millions of years to recover, but the heat is something the earth is used to dealing with. Radiation, made by man? Yeah, not so much.


Id have to respectfully disagree that the world can handle heat. The whole Permian Triassic event was caused by heating of the tundra and Arctic Ocean which in turn released the methane in both permafrost and hydrates which in turn produced more heat. This then set the world on a path that would eliminate 95% of life on this planet. The only difference now is that we have added a radioactive and toxic pollution component to extinction event #6.

It's all bad.

But I agree. In the long run the radiation will probably hamper recovery more than anything else.


I just see the number of volcanoes that just pop up all over the world and think that the earth has been dissipating heat from internal sources for a long time.

Until humans came along, nothing had poisoned the Earth yet.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: matadoor
Until humans came along, nothing had poisoned the Earth yet.


Very true. Thats why Ive spent my life as an environmental investigator since the 70s. Its also why I have trouble still doing that work today. From then till now things have gotten much worse, not better as I thought they would. The thing that scares me the most is what happens when the radiation, the toxins, the conversion of the natural world into a synthetic plastic world all come together to overwhelm the natural cycles of life as is now happening. There is no precedent. We are going where no one has ever gone before, yet the PTB seem oblivious to it all, dragging us ever forward at lightning speed, and thats why Fuku pisses me off so much. Its too obvious a catastrophe to ignore, yet ignore it they do.

Very, very scary.

M, you do demolition work yes. I dont know how up on nuclear explosions you are, but something that troubles me still is the danger of another explosion. Not a steam one, but one caused by compressing the corium or weapons grade plutonium undergorund from the weight on top of it. Is this a real fear or unfounded.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 10:24 AM
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This is the kind of stuff that drives me crazy. The IAEA is the worlds nuclear watchdog.....supposedly. Yet they have held up a report on the situation at the plant because they want to give TEPCO more time to explain their off the wall rationale that the radioactive water leaking into the ocean is rainwater that runs off of the site, and not contaminated groundwater, even though the radiation is leaking into the ocean whether it rains or not, day in day out. One of the so called rainwater events happened after two weeks of no rain, so TEPCO came up with the novel idea that rainwater was pooling on the roofs.

Yeah, right, thats where the problem is TEPCO and IAEA.

How does one get the info to the masses that the agencies supposedly safeguarding our future are actually preparing our coffins by protecting the very industries that are trying to kill us with their actions.

From fukushimaupdate.com...

The International Atomic Energy Agency delayed a report about meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to give Japanese officials another chance to explain radiation leaking into the Pacific Ocean.

The IAEA’s report about mid- to long-term plans to decommission the stricken reactors will be published in “mid-May,” agency spokesman Serge Gas said in an e-mailed reply to questions. The report had initially been scheduled for release by the end of March on the plant operated by Tokyo Electric Power Co.

“The Japanese government invited IAEA experts for a follow-up visit focused on contaminated rainwater issues and public communications,” Gas wrote in an e-mail from Vienna.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: zworld

originally posted by: matadoor
Until humans came along, nothing had poisoned the Earth yet.


Very true. Thats why Ive spent my life as an environmental investigator since the 70s. Its also why I have trouble still doing that work today. From then till now things have gotten much worse, not better as I thought they would. The thing that scares me the most is what happens when the radiation, the toxins, the conversion of the natural world into a synthetic plastic world all come together to overwhelm the natural cycles of life as is now happening. There is no precedent. We are going where no one has ever gone before, yet the PTB seem oblivious to it all, dragging us ever forward at lightning speed, and thats why Fuku pisses me off so much. Its too obvious a catastrophe to ignore, yet ignore it they do.

Very, very scary.

M, you do demolition work yes. I dont know how up on nuclear explosions you are, but something that troubles me still is the danger of another explosion. Not a steam one, but one caused by compressing the corium or weapons grade plutonium undergorund from the weight on top of it. Is this a real fear or unfounded.


I've never done a nuke explosion, but if I were to put some guess-ta-mates out there, I doubt it.

Let's start with a base:

en.wikibooks.org...:How_Things_Work/Nuclear_Bomb

In order for the plutonium core to go critical, requires a specific amount of explosive compression to cause the core to go critical. Odds that a build collapse could precisely compress the plutonium in such a way as to force it to go critical, I'd say is extremely remote to almost impossible.

Now, what if the hot core (that isn't currently being cooled) hits ground water? Explosion of water and radioactive materials that would scatter for a LONG way. BUT it would still be a conventional explosion.

I posted a story from a close friend about the B-52 over greenland that cooked off a nuke (there were 4 on board when the B-52 went down) but it just cooked offf the high explosives around the core, the fail safes worked, but plutonium was scattered all over the place.

The fact is, it takes a precise amount of compression to make Plutonium go critical, and I seriously doubt that any material collapsing on the plutonium in any of those buildings would invoke any of the material to go critical.

Now, you want to talk critical, let's talk about reactor #3.......



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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iodine 131 has a half life of 8 days give or take. the presence of I-131 in samples may suggest ongoing criticalities/pulses/burps, whatever way it could react.

f



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 11:08 AM
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Only faces 10,000 lawsuits. Just 10,000.

www.daijiworld.com...

Tokyo, May 6 (IANS): Nearly 10,000 people have filed lawsuits against the operator of the Fukushima nuclear plant, following the 2011 accident at the plant, according to data released by a group of Japanese lawyers.

Currently 9,992 people, among them home-owners unable to return to houses near the plant because of high radiation levels, have filed 25 joint lawsuits against Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) in 20 different courts, Efe news agency cited the group as telling Asahi newspaper on Wednesday.

More at the link....



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: fakedirt
iodine 131 has a half life of 8 days give or take. the presence of I-131 in samples may suggest ongoing criticalities/pulses/burps, whatever way it could react.

f


I have absolutely no doubt that everything is still reacting, and will continue to do so unimpeded for many years to come.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: matadoor

confirmation of I-131 in sewer waste, soil or other catchment media will nail it. I suspect tepco/iaea are fully aware of this and remain silent publicly whilst formulating options to deal with future sedition.
f.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: fakedirt
a reply to: matadoor

confirmation of I-131 in sewer waste, soil or other catchment media will nail it. I suspect tepco/iaea are fully aware of this and remain silent publicly whilst formulating options to deal with future sedition.
f.




Oh yeah, any try at explaining these away is going to be hilarious.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: matadoor

lol bananapolitics will take to the podium. orators will compare to our beloved banana, sadly sullying its name. they will be coaching a loveable-buffoon of a character (thinking of an English mayor type) for the eventual rollout to preach the all is safe script.
f.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 04:30 PM
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www.truthdig.com/report/item/flood_risk_to_nuclear_sites_raises_meltdown_fears_20150506

Good article on the dangers of flooding a nuke plant. The piece talks about the danger not only of oceans rising, but also the fact that many nuke plants are along rivers that are downstream from a dam. Not mentioned is the fact that the Boone Dam in the US is now falling apart with a water stream entering the river under the earthen part of the dam and not just one but three nuclear power plants downstream, each one with multiple reactors in full operation. They originally thought they had solved the problem in late 2014, but now know that the problem is much greater than antidcipated.

And this is a quote from a story about the dam two months ago. Since then its gotten worse yet the locals know almost nothing about what is currently happening according to forums.

“The dam itself is very robust, McCormick said. “We see no soft spots. It’s what is under the surface of the dam that is giving us alarm”.

Wow, give sparky a medal for that one. Brillaint yes?

www.johnsoncitypress.com...

I'd be packing my bags.

ON EDIT: And from the TVAs website we see the same Bart Simpson method of operation as we have seen at Fuku. This is how they prepare for a possible disaster much worse than Fukushima.

"What would happen if the dam failed?
Though it is highly unlikely, TVA has worked with counties, states, the National Weather Service and a host of other partners to prepare for such an event. If surveillance or instrumentation ever signaled an impending dam failure, TVA has Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) in place and would immediately notify affected counties to begin evacuations and the National Weather Service to broadcast a Dam Failure Flood Warning to the public."

I had to laugh. You bet they're ready for such an emergency, and if it happens they are going to scream RUN!!!


edit on 6-5-2015 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: zworld
www.truthdig.com/report/item/flood_risk_to_nuclear_sites_raises_meltdown_fears_20150506

Good article on the dangers of flooding a nuke plant. The piece talks about the danger not only of oceans rising, but also the fact that many nuke plants are along rivers that are downstream from a dam. Not mentioned is the fact that the Boone Dam in the US is now falling apart with a water stream entering the river under the earthen part of the dam and not just one but three nuclear power plants downstream, each one with multiple reactors in full operation. They originally thought they had solved the problem in late 2014, but now know that the problem is much greater than antidcipated.

And this is a quote from a story about the dam two months ago. Since then its gotten worse yet the locals know almost nothing about what is currently happening according to forums.

“The dam itself is very robust, McCormick said. “We see no soft spots. It’s what is under the surface of the dam that is giving us alarm”.

Wow, give sparky a medal for that one. Brillaint yes?

www.johnsoncitypress.com...

I'd be packing my bags.

ON EDIT: And from the TVAs website we see the same Bart Simpson method of operation as we have seen at Fuku. This is how they prepare for a possible disaster much worse than Fukushima.

"What would happen if the dam failed?
Though it is highly unlikely, TVA has worked with counties, states, the National Weather Service and a host of other partners to prepare for such an event. If surveillance or instrumentation ever signaled an impending dam failure, TVA has Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) in place and would immediately notify affected counties to begin evacuations and the National Weather Service to broadcast a Dam Failure Flood Warning to the public."

I had to laugh. You bet they're ready for such an emergency, and if it happens they are going to scream RUN!!!



From what I've been able to read (and please correct me if I'm wrong), the main issues appear to be that the bedrock base that they built the dam on, turned out to be more limestone than granite.

Umm, I thought proper core samples would be drilled to verify the makeup of the base of the dam?

But, honestly, if this is indeed the case, there has been leakage around the dam for DECADES it's just never been seen before.

Yeah, if the currents get a decent amount of rock/limestone removed and get decent flow of water, that dam could eventually collapse, but I'd like to see where the water paths are and flow rate, which I've yet to find.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: matadoor

I saw one map awhile ago but didn't keep it so from memory the path was (believed to be) just to the left of the dam itself through the smallest area of the earthen part. If it gives Im assuming it doesnt matter what condition the concrete bulkwork is in as the lake will drain around it. Thats why it seemed funny to me. Isnt the earthen part of the dam considered part of the dam.

Since it was a sinkhole that notified them of the problem Im guessing it has been going on for a long time too.

The thing that really bothers me is that they still arent going to drain the dam. If the amount of water in there is enough to inundate even one of the nuclear plants than it should have been done asap when they realized the extent of the problem. I know its a primary water supply but the risks far outweigh the inconvenience of water rationing.

Thats one thing that Fuku has done to me when it comes to nuke plants. zero risk or shut it down.



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 12:53 PM
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The Smithsonian chimes in on how this disaster has impacted the local birds...

www.smithsonianmag.com...

Birds Are in a Tailspin Four Years After Fukushima
Like the proverbial canary in a coalmine, avian abundances may paint a grim picture of the effects of nuclear disasters on wildlife

image: thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com...


The Eurasian tree sparrow is one of 30 bird species in decline around Fukushima. (Takao Onozato/Corbis)
By Ben Mirin
SMITHSONIAN.COM

The first time Tim Mousseau went to count birds in Fukushima, Japan, radiation levels in the regions he visited were as high as 1,000 times the normal background. It was July 2011, four months after the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent partial meltdown at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, and the nation was still recovering from massive infrastructure damage. Still, when Mousseau and his research partner rented a car and drove up from Tokyo, they encountered little resistance on the road.

More at the link.....



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 10:28 AM
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the-japan-news.com...

Lessons learned from Fuk.....

Behind the Scenes / Use what was learned in disaster areas

The Yomiuri Shimbun
Yomiuri Shimbun Senior Writer Makoto Hattori
10:29 am, May 10, 2015

By Makoto Hattori / Yomiuri Shimbun Senior Writer

The lessons learned during restoration work on disaster areas after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake have spread throughout the nation. It is hoped that what has been learned will help with the vitalization of local regions. So, what have we learned?

150,000 mobilized

The “OECD Tohoku School” was established in disaster areas. In the 2½ years following the disaster, Fukushima University implemented a project with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry to be conducted after school and on holidays. The project aimed to help find solutions through cooperation.

Approximately 100 middle and high school students from three disaster-stricken prefectures gathered for camps and regional activities, tackling the assigned task to “host a restoration event in Paris.”

More at the link, but it's really interesting to see the spin.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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Amazing the things we all miss. Anyone seen this yet?

www.youtube.com...

"Understanding the accident of Fukushima Daiichi NPS - Source IRSN"

If I missed this, and this is a re post, I sincerely apologize.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: matadoor

Notice how they dont try and analyze the explosion in unit 3 other than to list it as a hydrogen explosion. This ignoring the obvious physical signs of something else occurring is consistent with all the other reports. None actually look at the facts, how the explosion was barreled from the northwest corner, how it resembled a nuclear explosion, and all the other stuff we went over in the first thread. Cowards they are, following TEPCO and the IAEA's lead.

Typical.

If only Jaczko would say what he knows.



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