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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake - PART 2

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posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: thorfourwinds


Does anyone know how many sea lions were washing ashore, stranded or dying, before the Fukushima disaster? If this is being blamed on unseasonable warm or unseasonably cold ocean temps then they should've been dying in record amounts before 2011, too. A good way to see through the lies, maybe?

This is heartbreaking. I can't handle hearing such awful, sad animal stories!




posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: Silverlok

Silverlok, very interesting idea. Since the concept of going in with there Tonka toys and one day being able to remove the corium seems highly unlikely, something like what you propose makes sense. The problem is the level of groundwater under the reactors. In Chernobyl the groundwater table was far enough under the plant, (and the ocean far away), that remediation of the groundwater was stopped in midflight as the results of testing showed no contamination. At Fuku the groundwater comes right up to the level of the ground during heavy rains, and just below it under dry conditions. That and the fact that the ocean is the end resting place of the groundwater movement, the idea of removing the corium becomes something it seems that must be done at all costs, or we will probably be kissing the Pacific goodbye (which will probably happen anyway).

If they can find someway to stop the flow of groundwater then burying the plant as you suggest would be the ideal solution.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl
a reply to: thorfourwinds


Does anyone know how many sea lions were washing ashore, stranded or dying, before the Fukushima disaster? If this is being blamed on unseasonable warm or unseasonably cold ocean temps then they should've been dying in record amounts before 2011, too. A good way to see through the lies, maybe?

This is heartbreaking. I can't handle hearing such awful, sad animal stories!



Texasgirl, the numbers are way above any numbers from the years before Fuku. I'm going on memory but I think it started in 2012/2013, almost doubled in 2013/2014 and this year it has been up to 10 times the norm in some places, plus they are seeing it in an expanded range. As I said thats from memory but pretty sure its close.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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In case anyone is interested, there are plenty of nuke reactors and other nuke material littering the oceans, don't think it's just the pacific nor just Fuk.....

www.businessinsider.com...



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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originally posted by: matadoor
In case anyone is interested, there are plenty of nuke reactors and other nuke material littering the oceans, don't think it's just the pacific nor just Fuk.....

www.businessinsider.com...

That is out of control. And 'common practice till the 70s for everyone'. Wow....we are in deeper dodo than suspected, especially that " including five that still contain spent nuclear fuel".

from article.


Soviet Union dumped "19 ships containing radioactive waste; 14 nuclear reactors, including five that still contain spent nuclear fuel; 735 other pieces of radioactively contaminated heavy machinery; 17,000 containers of radioactive waste," and three nuclear submarines in the seas.

Disposing of nuclear waste and spent reactors at sea was actually a common practice around the world until the early 1970s. But the Soviet Union dumped a significant amount of material into bodies of water that were sometimes not that far from neighboring countries.

ON EDIT: And the next question is any of that radiation causing the rapid increase in Arctic temps. If so the geo engineering crowd can forget about cooling things down up there.
edit on 18-3-2015 by zworld because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: zworld

hello zworld

take a looksee at this article. it's from 2005.

news.bbc.co.uk...

inspect volumes if you would. for perspective 2000 cubic metres visualise a box 1 metre high by 1 metre wide by 2km long.

f.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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Silverlok, does this make sense. The following is the data for detection of Xenon 135. They show it's being detected in 1 but not 2 and 3, yet the detection limits are way high for 2 and 3, and would make 1 a ND as well. I don't get it.

In unit 1 indicated value 6.60E-04 detection limit 6.20E-04

In unit 2 indicated value ND detection limit 2.1E-01

In unit 3 indicated value ND detection limit 3.0E-01

www.tepco.co.jp...



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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Texasgirl, the numbers are way above any numbers from the years before Fuku. I'm going on memory but I think it started in 2012/2013,


I should state that the upsurge in numbers started in 2012, not seals dying, which of course occurs every year. But this year is by far the worst.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: fakedirt

fakedirt, the article you cited has a link to another BBC article that was equally interesting at news.bbc.co.uk...

They discuss the effect that radioactive waste has on different substances. The below is referencing something called neutron induced swelling, neutron embritlement and the Wigner Effect. Swelling and embritlement cause dislocations or voids in a crystalline structure, and the energy stored in dislocations is called the Wigner Effect. I have written a bit about this but this article raises some interesting points. I believe they are saying that zircon reacts in a way that it's crystalline structure arranges itself to protect from further neutron damage. Kinda a weird thing for something to do that isn't biotic. But the point that they don't raise is that neutron damage happens in any crystalline structure turning it into a potential bomb with stored Wigner energy. The salt caves being used in some countries are especially prone to being turned into a massive underground bomb.

But zircon protecting itself from this occurring is pretty strange indeed. From the article;

"The simulations suggest that when zircon gets heavily damaged, inside it there is crystalline damage, but on the outside it looks intact," Professor Dove explained.

The way the atoms sort themselves looks rather like ants scattering to form a protective ring against an intruder. This means that radioactive materials should find it much more difficult to escape the crystalline structure than if incorporated into a glass.

The atoms in zircon will actually spontaneously arrange themselves within the damaged area to form a protective shell.”

And then another interesting but troubling bit of data further in the story;

“Currently, plutonium is not officially classified as a "waste" material, according to Nirex, the UK's nuclear waste agency.

"Plutonium was going to be used as fuel, but because the government has made no decision on that yet, it is being stored for potential future use," explained Samantha King, waste management research scientist at Nirex.”



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: zworld

could the wigner effect be taken advantage of with zircon?

if energy could be drawn from a zircon medium at a steady state and I wonder if this
would reduce further damage to the structure .
perhaps the crystalline structure is prompted to re-arrange by the neutron pulse/stream.

I have a basic understanding of neutrons (high energy, no electric charge and determined to penetrate) so it's off to research this diamond of information you have revealed.

with regards to the uk, there is a lot of resistance to burying the various levels of waste. no council as yet are willing to
sign the dotted line, however a number of new reactors are planned. in the meantime the waste will accumulate and the billions of pounds continue to flow into decommissioning and waste storage on an annual basis.

f.



edit on 19-3-2015 by fakedirt because: neurons are not massless



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 04:50 AM
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Looking for Unit 1 Corium

Anyone able to translate?

www.tepco.co.jp...

photo.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: Purplechive

I can translate, but it'll have to wait. I'm going to be pretty busy tonight, lots of infrastructure upgrades at my office and I need to help with that. I promise I'll get on it when I have some spare time. IT Railgun, AWAY!



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: fakedirt

Its interesting for sure. If a non biological substance can actually evolve in that way to stop outflow of radionuclides the benefits would be enormous. Together with Silverloks idea there may be a way to contain Fuku but it would take so much time and money they would probably never consider looking into it.

But research is definately needed in this area. Let me know what you find.

z



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: Purplechive
Looking for Unit 1 Corium

Anyone able to translate?

www.tepco.co.jp...

photo.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive


Iori is on top of it. fukushima-diary.com...

Of course the results were as we figured. They couldnt find any corium. They did however find Waldo



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 05:50 PM
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A woman touches a monument with the names of tsunami victims in Arahama district in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture on March 11, 2015 (AFP Photo/Kazuhiro Nogi)

Japan marks 4th anniversary of quake-tsunami disaster

11 March 2015
100's of photographs of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster at the european pressphoto agency

4th anniversary of Fukushima nuclear disaster Photos and ...


KIMIMASA MAYAMA
- - Residents in the restricted access town of Namie, Fukushima Prefecture, northern Japan, lay flowers and offer a prayer for their parents killed by the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, in Namie, Japan, 11 March 2015, on the fourth anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami.

Namie town is close to Tokyo Electric Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The plant suffered a triple meltdown caused by the earthquake and tsunami that left at least 19,000 people dead.

EPA/KIMIMASA MAYAMA



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: fakedirt

Not sure if Wigner energy has a potential use, but have been doing research on zircon and have found that alloys of it are considered high on the list of potential long term waste storage except that alpha decay produces more damage than they thought back in 2005 when the BBC article was written, and this damage produces more Wigner energy than they thought. Will post a more detailed analysis soon, but the bottom line is that the dangers of Wigner energy are greater than I suspected.



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: fakedirt

gamma rays have differing levels of energy , ab initiato , so passing through even a single layer of graphene ( because of graphenes out of the ordinary 'electron retention' without a magnetic field) is likely to draw some of that power off ( lowering the gamma energy release ) In simulation it even scales up with respect to field induction intensity.
The real most important fact here is that some way of dealing with the liquid waste has to be found.

Any solution to this problem requires either;

dillusion

which has not been a thriller so far ( and for centuries to come )

or

concentration; there are ceramic filters that can reduce liquid concentrations , but the 'reduced' concentrate is highly radioactive...if the solution is as simple as that every concerned interest in the world can make weapons grade nuclear material

BUT at fuku ...they are not EVER going to clean the site. There is no way know to modern science ( without spending TONS AND TONS of dollars ) to eradicate the problem of EVEN A SINGLE CORE MELTING INTO THE EARTH, let alone three...

WE CANNOT FIX THE PROBLEM

SO ...tactically...fuku daichi becomes the waste dump , and because it HAS ALREADY AFFECTED EVERYTHING IN IT"S ENVIRONMENT IT COULD EFFECT, we accept this fact and move forward.

the melt cores have polluted ground water with a fountain of unyouth on an island, we do not have the tech to reverse this. WHY POLLUTE THE REST OF EVERYWHERE TOO?

fuku is ground zero, it is now and will be for the next century+ toxic to the air the ocean and the (fresh) water, this is already done and irreversible...

all that water 'waste' accumulating EVERY single day at fuku HAS TO END UP SOMEWHERE...where will that be?

Remember we never actual throw things away, we simple push them farther from ourselves...unfortunately, fuku and the nuker industry have proven that where to push the nuke waste is never , and can never be, far enough away .

in the case of tons and tons of nuclear waste and fuel ; dillusion turns out to be NOT THE SOLUTION ( if you do not believe this just wait a year or two ) .

so we cannot "fix" the fuku site ( and it's attendant interactions , including water supply poisoning that has already been happening for four years) then it becomes the best candidate for controlled concentration , that is unless some government programs want to step in with a method of managing and possibly utilizing the waste concentrated out of liquid ( i mean how do they mine and concentrate uraqnium to begin with ..right?)



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 11:29 PM
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a reply to: thorfourwinds
You hit right on the head of the process..will heavy materials precipitate on the under side of a graphene sheet ? If we can conclude that graphenes almost impermisiblity is due to a combination of thermal, physical and electrical/magnetic interactions ( how things in the real world work , but how things in academics are compartmentalized at the theoretical level more often then not as separate) then theoretically clumps will form until they reach a certain size/ mass / electrical charge and then they would drop , but I suspect that the uneven nature of the highly radioactive/ionized environment ( and possibly imperfection in the graphene ) could give rise to local, induced "calcifications" that would eventually clog .

So initially any bonets should be engineered to have a "life span" ( a mechanism to drop them in the reactor when not 'breathing' well )

as to cost of manufacture , well build a "giant" supersonic printer and spray the graphite onto paper ( or other steam soluble ) sheets then simply steam them off



posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: zworld
Silverlok, does this make sense. The following is the data for detection of Xenon 135. They show it's being detected in 1 but not 2 and 3, yet the detection limits are way high for 2 and 3, and would make 1 a ND as well. I don't get it.

In unit 1 indicated value 6.60E-04 detection limit 6.20E-04

In unit 2 indicated value ND detection limit 2.1E-01

In unit 3 indicated value ND detection limit 3.0E-01

www.tepco.co.jp...




a half-life of about 6.7 hours and decays into xenon-135 (half-life 9.2 hours


Xenon-135 has a half-life of 9.2 hours...that plus the nitrogen injection ( trying to mitigate hydrogen levels ) suggests that uncontrolled fission is still quite obviously ongoing. the recent ( today ) admission by Tepco that reactor core #1 does not have any fuel material left inside it makes it pretty obvious that that we have a) some deep melt masses and b)criticalities happening in the cooling fluids due to galvanic transport and surface boiling deposition (or should I say particulation?)

At a guess based on a mere surface skim of the information and 'Tepco's' observed behaviors I would say that if we can trust the info posted it would be a good bet that the core mass from one has hit a constant stream of ground water .

on that note since Tepco has admitted that one has no fuel , and one's "explosion" was not nearly as photogenic as three's awesome display ... is there anyway Tepco can convince ANYONE that most of three's core was not powered and blown into the atmosphere?



posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 10:05 AM
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The wall street journal has jumped on the bandwagon...

blogs.wsj.com...

Fukushima Watch: Images Confirm Meltdown

More at the link......



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