Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

My Rep wrote me back: He DID listen; And, 20 Need-To-Knows re Syrian Rebels

page: 5
71
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 12:45 PM
link   
reply to post by jedi_hamster
 


Also, It may very well be a publicity stunt, BUT NOW at least the rest of the WORLD knows it's NOT OUR CITIZENS!! It's our stupid, corrupt GOVERNMENT!

Obama will live in shame for the rest of his life, just like GWB and his war-mongering cronies.

Evil. They and their masters. And I DON'T CARE ANYMORE who is REALLY calling the shots - if these gutless wonders do the bidding of anyone else when they KNOW it's wrong - they are equally responsible.

Tools. Send them to mars; or to the front lines. Bastards.




posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 12:52 PM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 


Like you, I also contacted my Senators and Congressman. All 3 wrote me back saying they plan to vote "No" to action in Syria!

Now we just have to wait and see how good their word is.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 03:52 PM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 


it doesn't matter that people know who's to blame when they do nothing. US citizens should be throwing their government right into the ocean in this very moment. otherwise "it isn't our fault" is not an excuse.

of course it is. you knew what's going on, it is your government and you did nothing.

also, it's all about the fact who's calling the shots, because those that do shouldn't have such power and they have to be stopped.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 09:12 PM
link   
reply to post by jedi_hamster
 



you knew what's going on, it is your government and you did nothing.

What?!!! ??? NO, WE DID NOT know what's going on..... not until very recently. You seem quite the arrogant know-it-all.....


we are doing something now!!! So freaking sorry if it's not enough for you, mister judge.

Do you live here? No? Then you have no room to tell us what we knew, and what we didn't.

Back off.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 09:55 PM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 


do you think that contacting the very people responsible for an act of treason and killing of their own citizens (9/11) and asking them "please please don't create yet another war, don't kill millions for money and power" is enough? do you think it matters? do you think they've suddenly stopped lying to you? are you trying to calm down your own subconsciousness or are you trying to make a DIFFERENCE?

you're right, i don't live in the US. i won't have to deal with the domestic mess you've created for yourselves. when millions around the world die because of your government actions though, it is your nation that that government represents - and since it does not, it is your duty to get rid of them.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 09:57 PM
link   
reply to post by jedi_hamster
 


And if you take the time to read my posts and threads, you'll see that I'm doing what I can.



posted on Sep, 10 2013 @ 10:09 PM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 


believing those that had lied to you for the past years won't help you, unless you're seeking temporary comfort. and don't tell me you didn't know - 9/11 isn't anything new, nor are their countless wars backed up by nothing but lies.

perhaps i'm wrong. perhaps there are some honest people in your government. but even if - they are outnumbered. you do know the current situation, do you think Obama gives a damn if he'll live in shame for the rest of his days? he'll live. millions may die. screaming in outrage at those bastards won't change anything. their lies have to be exposed so that there can be a slightest chance of stripping them of their power.

i'm afraid some things are bound to happen though.



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 10:42 AM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 


My Rep wrote me back too. Basically, he gave me the party line about the Syrian government using Sarin, which is unproven, IMO, per the NYT letter from Putin and etc.

Included, in case you wanna read the oficial line on this.

------------------------------------

Dear David,

Thank you for contacting me about your concerns regarding potential U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict. I appreciate you taking the time to write and share your thoughts with me.

There is no question that the ongoing conflict in Syria has become a major humanitarian crisis and a cause of significant regional instability. This conflict, which started more than two years ago when protests against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad turned violent, has gone from bad to worse. In fact, more than 100,000 Syrians have died and more than two million have been displaced and now live in refugee camps in countries like Jordan and Turkey.

In the midst of this terrible conflict, there is strong evidence from intelligence reports (from our country as well as reports from France and the United Kingdom) that the Assad regime recently used chemical weapons, brutally murdering over 1,000 Syrians – including hundreds children – and having long-lasting negative impacts on surviving civilians.

In response, President Obama sought Congressional authorization for a limited military strike against the Syrian government. Then, during the President's address to the nation on Sept. 10, he postponed a vote to authorize the use of force in Syria in order to pursue a potential diplomatic solution proposed by Russia. This potential solution would require Syria giving up its chemical weapons to the international community.

I've heard from many constituents who believe that the US must exhaust all diplomatic options before taking military action. I agree. We should fully pursue this diplomatic avenue.

While I am hopeful a diplomatic solution can be achieved, any proposal for Syria to voluntarily give up its chemical weapons to the international community must be fully vetted to ensure that there is a realistic plan to overcome the challenges of containing these stockpiles in the midst of a civil war. The key question regarding any US or international effort– diplomatic or military – is whether it will limit the ability of the Assad regime to continue to use chemical weapons against its own people or transfer them to others who could use them against the United States or our allies. I look forward to reviewing details of a proposal to determine whether it can be successful in this goal. Now is the time for Assad to back up his words with action and give up his chemical weapons to prevent future atrocities.

Should diplomacy fail, Congress may still consider whether to authorize the use of military force. I am still reviewing the intelligence and analysis surrounding the proposed military response. And I'm actively listening to the people I represent.

These are among the most difficult decisions our nation faces, and I believe it is appropriate and necessary that we have a full debate over what action, if any, will be in the best interest of our nation. That said, I'd like to briefly share with you some of my thoughts.

Let me start by saying what I do not support: I do not support sending American troops into Syria. Having just returned from Afghanistan, I'm more mindful than ever of the extraordinary sacrifices that have already been made by our servicemembers. And I return with very little appetite for seeing our nation getting entrenched in another Middle Eastern conflict.

In addition, I do not support taking action that would start a larger regional conflict. And I do not support empowering extremist factions that may one day take up arms against the United States or our allies.

In the days ahead, I want to do everything I can to understand the answers to some key questions and key considerations that I am weighing.

First of all, I want to understand what success looks like and how any military action would promote America's interests in the region and around the world.

What will be the impact of the strike in the short, medium, and long-term? Will military action actually degrade the Assad regime's capacity to use chemical weapons? In what ways do we expect military action to affect our allies in the region? What happens if we approve the use of military force and Assad again uses chemical weapons?

When the House Armed Services Committee held a hearing on the situation in Syria, I posed some of these questions to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey. I will continue pushing for detailed responses to these questions as the situation continues to develop.

Moreover, I want to be sure we understand the implications of choosing not to act. By waging chemical warfare against his own people, it is clear that Assad is openly defying the global community's long-standing opposition to these deadly weapons. Assad now joins Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein as tyrants who have used chemical weapons during war. What message is sent to Assad – and to other leaders with bad intentions toward America and its allies – if they believe they can use chemical weapons without consequence?



Finally, what role will the rest of the international community play to deter further use of chemical weapons?

We need to be very careful about not being further drawn into a conflict that we have limited ability to resolve. While the U.S. is right to call for President Assad's removal from office, we have to be mindful that U.S. military action alone will not solve this civil war. There must be a political solution between the regime's supporters and opponents. The United States cannot impose that solution through military action.

As the situation in Syria continues to evolve, I appreciate you sharing your views on this important issue. I welcome your continued thoughts and suggestions.

Thank you for reaching out. It is an honor to serve as your representative.

Sincerely,

Derek Kilmer
Member of Congress

--------------------------------------



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 09:58 PM
link   
My Rep has now written back to me, too (as of today). I think maybe they were waiting for something to shift before responding. This is the part I was happy to read:



The War Power Resolution prohibits the United States from entering an armed conflict without the consent and consultation of Congress. While ensuring that chemical weapons are never used in warfare is a vital foreign policy goal, it’s also important that we do not violate international law by intervening in foreign country without the consent of the U.N Security Council. All diplomatic channels must be exhausted, and all international institutions must be engaged, before military action in Syria is justified. Going at it alone, without the backing of the international community, is not a justifiable option. Please be assured I will keep your concerns in mind as the U.S. continues to assess this situation, especially with regard to determining how best to respond to Syrian President Assad’s unconscionable use of chemical weapons against his own people.


Here is the whole email (carriage returns were stripped out when I copied the text, and I did not go through and try to figure out where to add them back in, so it is a TLDR unless you are interested in reading the wall of text, my apologies)...



RAÚL M. GRIJALVA 3rd District of Arizona Washington Office: 1511 Longworth HOB Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-2435 grijalva.house.gov September 12, 2013 Dear Ms. XXXXXX: Thank you for contacting me about your concerns with possible U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict. I appreciate your comments on this troubling and developing situation. As you may know, the conflict in Syria began in March 2011 with peaceful protests against the Assad regime and in support of a democratic government. Since then, the humanitarian crisis in Syria has progressively worsened as roughly 100,000 Syrians have lost their lives and almost 2 million Syrian refugees have fled into the nearby countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. The instability this is causing within Syria ,and the region is deeply troubling. Most troubling, however, are credible reports indicating Assad’s forces killed as many as 1,300 Syrian civilians in a chemical weapons attack on August 21st. In response, Secretary of State John Kerry recently denounced the use of chemical weapons and revealed that President Obama is considering a planned response - in coordination with our allies - that may include military strikes by U.S. and/or NATO forces against the Assad regime. While I share the Administration’s outrage over the use of chemical weapons, I also share the reservations of many Americans who question the appropriateness of further military action in the Middle East. Though the President is Commander in Chief, it is Congress’s responsibility to authorize the use of military force. Therefore, absent an imminent threat to the U.S. or our allies, I am very pleased the President decided to consult Congress and seek authorization before any military action is taken in the name of the American people. In fact —to make sure he took this course of action — I joined more than one hundred House colleagues in sending a bipartisan letter to President Obama urging him to seek authorization from Congress before using military force in Syria. You may also be pleased to know that I voted for the House Defense Appropriations Act, H.R. 2397, which included specific provisions prohibiting Department of Defense funding to be spent in Syria unless the Administration’s actions comply with the War Powers Resolution. The War Power Resolution prohibits the United States from entering an armed conflict without the consent and consultation of Congress. While ensuring that chemical weapons are never used in warfare is a vital foreign policy goal, it’s also important that we do not violate international law by intervening in foreign country without the consent of the U.N Security Council. All diplomatic channels must be exhausted, and all international institutions must be engaged, before military action in Syria is justified. Going at it alone, without the backing of the international community, is not a justifiable option. Please be assured I will keep your concerns in mind as the U.S. continues to assess this situation, especially with regard to determining how best to respond to Syrian President Assad’s unconscionable use of chemical weapons against his own people. I would like to thank you again for contacting me. Please know that my staff and I will be monitoring this issue closely to take the necessary steps to make sure your voice is heard on this issue in Congress. Democracy works best when we stay in touch, so I hope you will continue to contact me about the issues that matter most to you. Please visit grijalva.house.gov, where you can sign-up for e-mail updates, send a message to me about current events or pending legislation, access my statements and press releases, request copies of legislation and government reports, and receive detailed information about the many services that I am privileged to provide for my constituents. I am honored to serve you, so please never hesitate to contact me in the future. Sincerely, Raúl M. Grijalva Member of Congress Please do not reply to this email, as this box is unattended. Instead, please use the contact form on my website if you have any further comments. Click Here to Sign Up for Congressman Grijalva's E-Newsletter



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 05:49 PM
link   
I received a followup email from my Senator today.

"Dear Adam,

Thank you for your earlier email to me on the violence in Syria and the possibility of U.S. military intervention. I appreciate having heard from you and I want to share with you my thoughts as the situation continues to develop.

As I wrote in my previous message to you and have said in my public comments, I have had serious reservations about the proposed military action in response to Syria's chemical weapons attack on its citizens. I have spent hours meeting with the President, Vice President, and officials from the Pentagon, State Department, and intelligence services, and those discussions have not resolved my concerns about the wisdom of the proposed plans. If the Senate votes on the resolution (S.J.Res.21) authorizing that proposed plan, I will oppose it.

I share the President's belief that the use of chemical weapons by Syria is horrific. But it demands a strong international diplomatic response incorporating an array of political and economic actions. The goal should be to deter any additional use by Syria or any other nation. The international community should hold Syria to its promise to transfer its chemical weapons stockpile to international control. While achieving this goal will be challenging, I applaud the progress the administration has made towards its goal in the last few days.

Thank you, again, for sharing your thoughts with me. I hope that you will continue to reach out to me about the issues that are most important to you.

All my best,

Jeffrey A. Merkley
United States Senator"





new topics

top topics



 
71
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join