DNA... has this gone to far?

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posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:49 AM
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The new testing is done on 1000 new born baby's www.nbcnews.com... want to make your sick one well, use dial a DNA. of Obama care, press or say 1 for yes 2 for no....
sorry did not get your entry, please hang up and try again, or use your smart phone app....
send a pic of the DNA report form your doctor 6 to 8 week's well send you the injection kit, easy to use. and free if you qualify.

ok sounds a bit far fetched but then you have to ask why.
If not for some heath care reason, then why, here is a clue, from the link

Good medicine or TMI? What happens if you screen all of a baby's genes?


Newborns are routinely screened at birth for around 30 disorders, using blood from a heel prick test. A whole genome screening would cover not only known genetic defects but the entire DNA map.

The U.S. government is funding an ambitious set of studies into what happens if you screen the entire genome of newborns. The goal is to find out whether such testing brings better health care or unwanted information overload.

Do parents even want to know what fate might await their babies? Can doctors find out anything useful medically? Do you get information that freaks you out? All over the country, thousands of newborns will be enrolled in this experiment, the National Institutes of Health announced on Wednesday.

Did you get it or skip right over it? , here it is again

A whole genome screening would cover not only known genetic defects but the entire DNA map.
but why oh Can you see the Obama care coming

“We really want to take advantage of this window of opportunity to answer key questions about the technical, ethical, social implications while we have a chance to do it,” Green added. “If it turns out this is something that is worth doing, we would answer questions about how to make it most effective.”
Lets say this becomes the norm, will you get the test and have your child or self reprogrammed by DNA RNA injections?
edit on 5-9-2013 by bekod because: line edit
edit on Thu Sep 5 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS




posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Reminds of the movie Gattica....

I have four children between the ages of 15 - 4.

Guess how many times they go to the hospital for being sick? Out of four children - twice in 15 years. Guess how much antibiotics have been pumped into my kids. Twice. Once for each girl.

The boys have never needed an antibiotic - and they're the least genetically manipulated. Go figure.

My oldest boy was to the doctors twice in his life. Not for being sick, but for injuries playing and just need care for bones and cuts running around like a fool. He's a boy.

So keep taking your kids to the doc for everyday sniifles and allergies they will likely grow out of. Have at it, but me and my healthy family will pass. We've been healthier because of it. The only thing the medical industry is interested in is finding something, anything - so your medicated. It line their pockets, and lightens yours. Doesn't even matter if it's something that doesn't really necessarily have to be treated - they still got a pillfor you....

And all those side effects, don't mind those - they got a pill for that too....

Cirque



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by bekod
 


This is an amazing use of genetic technology, I don't care what the paranoid luddites on ATS say. Not only will it advance medical treatment dramatically, it's also a huge step forward in tracking and epidemiology of genetic disorders. Sequencing the human genome was a start, but being able to cross-reference mutations tied to specific diseases? That's something else entirely.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by ShadeWolf
 


Your mileage varies from mine as I see this as another step towards a Brave New World, and that scares me. This is not the only thing that scares me, it's just one in a long line of new tech that could be used nefariously. We can only hope that mankind will use it for good but our track record as a species ain't that great.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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TheSpanishArcher
reply to post by ShadeWolf
 


Your mileage varies from mine as I see this as another step towards a Brave New World, and that scares me. This is not the only thing that scares me, it's just one in a long line of new tech that could be used nefariously. We can only hope that mankind will use it for good but our track record as a species ain't that great.


i see this as a nefarious way to surreptitiously gain a database of DNA for later police and govt records.

"how did you find me"
"we had your DNA on record from when you were a baby!"



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by okamitengu
 


That's the short term goal. Who the hell knows where this tech will take us, or maybe more precisely, where we will take it. Maybe I've read too many sci-fi and dystopian novels over the years and I've become too cynical. At least I probably won't be around to see the outcome.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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They screen the entire DNA? I can see it getting to a point if a known possible undesirable trait shows up, you decide not to have it tweaked.. The administration steps in and reports you to social services.. The same when designer baby's hit it big.. If a certain number of upgrades aren't done, your a bad parent.. Once we cross that line there is no going back.. If years later a genetic virus or bug developes, those who had it done a screwed..

The return of the nephilim may just be us screwing with the source code..

Personally, this crap scares the pants of me..



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 09:32 PM
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reply to post by TheSpanishArcher
 


Okay, here's how I think about it: say a child has an unclassified genetic disorder (which is more common than you'd think, we've only scratched the surface of genetic disease, just look at Brooke Greenberg). Right now, to locate any information on other cases or treatments for this condition, a doctor will have to pore over thousands of pages of academic papers and data looking for any similarities or useful information. In a system where genetic data is on file and cross-indexed like this one should be, all the doctor needs to do is compare the patient's genome to a "standard" reference (very likely a composite of many people, to correct for individual variances), then search the nonstandard chromosome variants against a national or global database. Now you have access to the collected information on every case in the system, with notes from other doctors, treatments, etc.





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