Lack of talent to fill software development jobs? Or lack of willingness to hire veteran developers.

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posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 09:20 AM
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Employers Still Unable to Fill Key Jobs; Lack of Talent to Blame

I have some observations about corporate culture that could explain some of the ridiculous claims about the "lack of talent" to fill the multitude of low-paying software development jobs.

Since there hasn't been any loyalty by employers to their employees, directors and managers have no justification for reciprocal loyalty which means they have no interest in the long term success of their companies.

Most managers will not hire anyone who gets paid more than they do or has greater freedom to work remotely.

A critical component to this disconnect is that if a department could increase efficiency and cut costs, they are generally not allowed to reallocate their budget. They simply lose that money even if they generate a significant increase in revenue.

This has the effect of discouraging improvement. Only seat warmers can be added since they can maintain or increase their budget, productivity is not a consideration.

Perhaps worst of all, once a director has held a position for a year or more, any significant improvements to their departments have the effect of revealing their previous incompetence which endangers their own career security.

A perpetual culture of defensiveness is born!

Additionally, since so many young people are emerging from the intellectual gristmill of higher education with questionable skills, no experience and enormous debt, human resources personnel simply lower their wage offerings to adapt to the perceived increase in the availability of 'talent.'

Crap begets crap and the symptoms go unaddressed because of the points I have made above.
edit on 5-9-2013 by greencmp because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 


Recently we were looking for programers here in miami for one of our contractors.
It seems that some company has started up locally and has hired all the good programmers out there.
Not only that but our contractor has had 2 programmers stolen out from under him by another company that was willing to pay a ridiculous amount of money for them.

He simply couldn't afford to pay them the amount they were going to make.

So in Miami, at least, we have a shortage of veteran developers. Which is a good thing I guess. They are all working.

my 2 cents.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 
It is so obviously not a lack of talent but rather a lack of willingness on the part of companies to lower their profit margines by even the tiniest of percentages to hire quality developers. Why pay scale with a sweet benefits package when you can get someone fresh out of school with questionable talents who will work for barely above minimum wage and demand no benefits? You might get lucky and pick a few raw talents. Monetary savings is substituted for skill and the middle class becomes obsolete all in the wave of a human resources officer's hand.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Awesome! That is great news, let's hope it is the beginning of a trend.

Many of the elite developers have simply put the 'gone fishing' sign in their windows (not just because of this phenomenon) so that may account for the thin supply.
edit on 5-9-2013 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:37 AM
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Interesting views there OP. Any suggestions how to turn such a problem to "opportunities" for this group as well ??



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 


I’ve seen this a lot recently and I blame a great deal of it on HR departments doing all the prescreening. With the ease of electronic resume submission, many job seekers apply for every opening they see regardless of their qualifications. A little known tid bit is that due to the large volume of resume’s from job seekers, HR departments use filtering software to weed out “qualified” applicants based on automated key word searches. Unfortunately for many truly qualified candidate, their resume will be rejected by the screening software based on a lack of keywords.

Another issue is HR departments not truly understanding the needs of the hiring manager and not knowing how to interpret the resumes they are seeing. They over specify the position without realizing what skills are cross disciplinary and compatible.

A tip for job seekers is to find a position you are really qualified for ad custom write your resume for that job. Sure, you might only get out a few resumes a day or even a week but your odds of getting a callback are orders of magnitude higher than had you simple taken your “standard” resume and submitted it. Its quality over quantity.

Another sneakier tip is to cut the add, paste it into your resume, highlight all the text, give it the smallest font size you can and turn the text’s color the exact same color as the back ground (white text on white background). This way the screening software sees all the keywords, and HR doesn’t see what you did.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by octahedron
 


Excellent question! This does create opportunities for seasoned developers to create new businesses instead of whoring out to unappreciative companies. A fantastic result for markets and consumers and it is consistent with traditional statistics after lackluster economic recoveries.

Down with monopolies and up with individual wealth creation!



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by SirMike
 


Those are great recommendations for sure, especially the 'paste the ad in the response' tactic!


However, they don't address the fundamental issue of resistance by the management once any candidate makes it past the robots at the door.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by littled16
 


Your frustration is understandable but, I am proposing that it isn't that companies are choosing to lower costs at the expense of quality but that they are actually choosing higher costs for lower quality as a result of corporate culture rot.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by greencmp
 


Dont know what to tell you.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by SirMike
 


No worries, it is a rant afterall



posted on Oct, 11 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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SirMike
reply to post by greencmp
 

Another sneakier tip is to cut the add, paste it into your resume, highlight all the text, give it the smallest font size you can and turn the text’s color the exact same color as the back ground (white text on white background). This way the screening software sees all the keywords, and HR doesn’t see what you did.


Do you think it would work to put the add contents in the document metadata, or maybe a comment in the document?



posted on Oct, 11 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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theGleep

SirMike
reply to post by greencmp
 

Another sneakier tip is to cut the add, paste it into your resume, highlight all the text, give it the smallest font size you can and turn the text’s color the exact same color as the back ground (white text on white background). This way the screening software sees all the keywords, and HR doesn’t see what you did.


Do you think it would work to put the add contents in the document metadata, or maybe a comment in the document?

Yes, in the metadata would work for sure.





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