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A new timeline for the origin of ancient Egypt has been established

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posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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A new study has narrowed the start of the ancient Egyptian state


Commenting on the research, Prof Joann Fletcher from the department of archaeology at the University of York, said: "This is highly significant work, which pulls the beginnings of Egypt's dynastic history into much sharper focus - it is tremendously valuable to have such a precise timeline for Egypt's first rulers.


Previous records suggested the pre-Dynastic period, a time when early groups began to settle along the Nile and farm the land, began in 4000BC. But the new analysis revealed this process started later, between 3700 or 3600BC. The team found that just a few hundred years later, by about 3100BC, society had transformed to one ruled by a king.


BBC article on the paper

ABSTRACT: An absolute chronology for early Egypt using radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical modelling

PDF An absolute chronology for early Egypt using radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical modelling






edit on 5/9/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 03:40 AM
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Interesting, thanks for the post, OP. Will be back when I'm more rested



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 05:03 AM
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The chronology of early Egypt has always been somewhat dodgy, so any attempt to firm it up is always welcome.

Not had a chance to properly read through his stats yet though.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks for posting this. Noted and bookmarked for future reference



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


A similar study is underway in the Assyriology community, reassessing the existing data. I suspect we'll see a slight decrease in age for that too but less precise.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


You fabricated this, Hans. It's obvious because everyone knows that Egyptologists and Archaeologists in general are dead-set opposed to any new ideas taking hold in their field.

They all conspire to keep the status quo and to prevent the general public from knowing any of the REAL truths about the past.

Because this fact is undeniable, there is no way any mainstream archaeologist has established a different timeline!

Harte



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 

Hans, could you tell us a bit more about what this means? A readjustment of about 650 years is profound, yet it seems relatively small compared to the great age of Egyptian civilisation. What does it mean, for instance, in terms of how the Egyptians related to other cultures extant in the world at the time? Are there any implications for international trade and other forms of intercourse? Cultural exchange? Inventions?



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:21 AM
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Hmm how did I missed this thread, and how do the new dating impact the finds at cemetery L in Qustul, known as Ta-Seti often touted as the first state on the Nile.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by Harte
reply to post by Hanslune
 


You fabricated this, Hans. It's obvious because everyone knows that Egyptologists and Archaeologists in general are dead-set opposed to any new ideas taking hold in their field.

They all conspire to keep the status quo and to prevent the general public from knowing any of the REAL truths about the past.

Because this fact is undeniable, there is no way any mainstream archaeologist has established a different timeline!

Harte


Curse you Harte you're on to me, I must now shave my head, convert to radial Hinduism and walk to T-town in Honduras.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:35 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
reply to post by Hanslune
 

Hans, could you tell us a bit more about what this means? A readjustment of about 650 years is profound, yet it seems relatively small compared to the great age of Egyptian civilisation. What does it mean, for instance, in terms of how the Egyptians related to other cultures extant in the world at the time? Are there any implications for international trade and other forms of intercourse? Cultural exchange? Inventions?


As I understand it would mean the AE took a little longer to get organized than previously thought, which means once they did get organized they advanced at a faster pace during the pre-dynastic and into the old kingdom.

The fall out of this study will cause a re-assessment of previous held ideas with a look at developing a pro or con position as to what has come out, whether it is viable or what justified criticism can be made about it.

I'm going to watch what the Egyptologists and other smart people say on this subject - on another forum.
edit on 6/9/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by Spider879
Hmm how did I missed this thread, and how do the new dating impact the finds at cemetery L in Qustul, known as Ta-Seti often touted as the first state on the Nile.


Sorry cannot answer that as it is outside my area of knowledge



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:56 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by Spider879
Hmm how did I missed this thread, and how do the new dating impact the finds at cemetery L in Qustul, known as Ta-Seti often touted as the first state on the Nile.


Sorry cannot answer that as it is outside my area of knowledge


Hmm bummer.. because the demise of Ta-Seti the state coincides with the rise of the 1st dyn. under Aha. hope they can clean up the dates more as it would affect others sites just outside the borders of traditional Kmt.
edit on 6-9-2013 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by Spider879

Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by Spider879
Hmm how did I missed this thread, and how do the new dating impact the finds at cemetery L in Qustul, known as Ta-Seti often touted as the first state on the Nile.


Sorry cannot answer that as it is outside my area of knowledge


Hmm bummer.. because the demise of Ta-Seti the state coincides with the rise of the 1st dyn. under Aha. hope they can clean up the dates more as it would affect others sites just outside the borders of traditional Kmt.
edit on 6-9-2013 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)


I'll ask your question at another site






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