Israel and the -135

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posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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As if the tanker shortage in the US isn't bad enough already, now the government is looking to basically give the Israeli Air Force several KC-135 tankers. Yes, they would probably be out of the boneyard, after undergoing a depot level refit, but if they can do that for Israel, why not do it for the US?

Many years ago, in the 1990s, when we had E and R model tankers, I can remember watching fighters sit on the ramp for so long that they would have to perform a Functional Check Flight before they could fly again. The reason they were waiting? They broke during their scheduled move, and were having to wait for a tanker going the right direction to piggyback on. On one occasion it took 88 days to finally get a tanker going the right direction, and by then the fighters had sat so long they broke.

The original deal proposed to Israel, under the Excess Defense Articles Program would allow the US government to either give, or sell at a seriously reduced rate military equipment to foreign countries, was for 3 KC-135E models. Israel has said they'll only look at a deal if they are R models, with the CFM-56 engine, and they're looking for 12 of them.

To date the US has sold off tankers to France, Turkey, Singapore, and Indonesia. Most of them are boneyard examples, but there is a noticeable and increasing tanker gap in the US military. The first of the reengined R models have been retired to the boneyard, and more will surely follow.


The Israeli air force says it will only evaluate a US offer to sell it surplus Boeing KC-135 tankers if the aircraft involved are R-model examples.

Washington has so far only proposed the sale of three KC-135Es, worth around $200 million.

Israeli sources say the air force has made it clear it prefers the CFM56-powered R-model aircraft. These are included in the USA's excess defense articles programme, which allows Washington to give its allies military hardware for free, or at a greatly reduced price.

The Israeli service is looking for new tankers, and surplus KC-135s were included in a US offer of equipment several months ago, which also featured the Bell-Boeing V-22 tiltrotor.

Israeli sources say that if the USA agrees to supply the longer-range KC-135R a deal could include 12 examples, to be transferred after undergoing depot maintenance in the USA.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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Oh sure Americans are more than happy to have our tax dollars thrown away to Israel. If they want to be so picky then let them pay the full price you know like the American taxpayer. We cannot cut this parasite of a nation off fast enough.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


I'm fed up with the Air Force leadership creating gaps in our capabilities so they can get their shiny new toys. They flat out lied to Congress about the F-22 and F-35 capabilities, so they could get more of them, while screwing the tanker replacement program into the ground three or four times, because "we don't need it", because apparently our 50 year old tankers have low hours on them, so they'll fly another forty years.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by buster2010
 


Israel is not just another country....refuse to be a victim....Israel has evil leaders....but soon they will be held up in front for all to shame....So, what is Israel.....a special ....center of attention......country. Watch what God does with this....



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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Here in Pittsburgh we're replacing the the old 135 with upgraded 167 variant refueler. 171st air refueling wing.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by Bigburgh
 


They just started building the 2nd engineering and test article last week. The first spar was placed into the machine they use to build the wings. First flight of article one is late next year. First rollout is January, with second in March. First delivery is around 2017 or so.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Thread Killer...

As I've said before, the F-22 and F-35 planes are examples of keeping some American industries alive while making these craft for export to the "have nots." (Maybe that is why they don't care too much that they are substandard machines?)

We have better stuff working for us that does not need tankers, jet fuel, runways or even air. We in the public that have witnessed and photographed this equipment call them "triangles."

I understand reporting on moves of the industry as a hobby or being involved in the business, but to make projections of what those moves means without understanding the far bigger picture that is clear to the undogmatic is simply short-sighted.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


The flaw in your logic there is that the F-22 is not ALLOWED to be exported, and production was closed after 183 aircraft, dues to cost, when the initial requirement was for 750. so you are wrong.

You simply do not train and equip a 'false' military, the mere idea is absurd, as is your repeated meme about these aircraft programmes being simple diversions away from something much more advanced. I guess thats why they are having so many problems, but of course the triangles work perfectly. Whatever.

Back in the real world, I read on Flights members area that the UK is considering a future purchase of the F-35A in addition to the B models we are already committed to. This would mean we have now considered going for all three models!

I can only surmise that this is a potential option for replacing the Typhoon, from maybe 2035 onwards, with its higher g rating and combat capability compared to the B. Not sure how I feel about that tbh.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Its been my theory all along (with a little weight behind it) that the enormous cost of the jsf is a cover for a fightet that is already tested and might even be being produced as we speak.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by boomer135
 


They probably wouldn't want that one to get out either because of all the other countries that have paid for this fighter aswell.



posted on Sep, 7 2013 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by stealthbomber
 


The F-35 will go ahead, but in much smaller numbers than they have publicly stated. It has to, just because of all the other countries that have bought them. They'll find a way to reduce costs that they can tell the public, to make sure that those other countries don't feel screwed, and then buy a much smaller buy for the US than planned.



posted on Sep, 7 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Do you think in the mean time they would declassify the other fighter, or would they have to leave it classified until all the JSF business is out of the way first?



posted on Sep, 7 2013 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by stealthbomber
 


I suspect unless they have to, it'll stay classified until at least a few years after IOC, probably somewhere around 2020 minimum.





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