What is the difference between Liberalism and neo-liberalism?

page: 1
4

log in

join

posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 08:54 PM
link   
Can someone tell me the difference between Liberalism and neo-liberalism?




posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 11:59 PM
link   
Classical liberalism emphasizes the sovereignty of the individual, whereas neo-liberalism emphasizes the ultimacy of the collective. The two ideologies are so disparate one has to wonder why they both continue using the term "liberal" at all.

Well, it's actually not hard at all to figure out. In America at least, "neo-liberalism" is much more palatable than "socialism", which is what it really is. Same thing with "neo-conservatism". Fascism. That's what it really means. They're just playing tricks with the language.



posted on Sep, 3 2013 @ 06:35 PM
link   
reply to post by NthOther
 


classical liberal = individualist
neo-liberal = statist socialist
neo-conservative = statist fascist
libertarian = stateless socialist



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 11:26 PM
link   
Neo-liberal is a stupid term that I wish would just be tossed out. As far as I understand it neo-liberal has to do with wanting to push capitalism on other countries- basically the same as neo-conservatism except just not a facade for grabbing power and riches like neo-cons are.

It's supposed to be well intentioned, wanting to improve the world, but it really applies to such a small segment of the electorate that it's irrelevant, IMO.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 11:48 PM
link   

John_Rodger_Cornman
reply to post by NthOther
 


classical liberal = individualist
neo-liberal = statist socialist
neo-conservative = statist fascist
libertarian = stateless socialist


Yeah. My perspective is the same. May I add?

Classical Liberal - Individualist - Very much in line with the french notions of a republic, liberty, fraternity, egality.

Neo-Liberal - Statist Socialist - So convinced of the greater good through governance that they are blind to the fact that the greater good's foundation is based on infringement and arbitrary mandates that basically amounts to de facto fascism, and therefore categorically not a "greater good".

Classical Conservative - Individualist - Very much in line with the Renaissance notion of classical republicanism, somewhat Machiavellian (not necessarily in a bad way), so long as freedom, morals, and ethics are preserved.

Neo-Conservative - Statist-Fascist - So convinced of the greater good through laissez-faire and the corporate "private" petitioning and infiltration of government that they are blind to the fact that their greater good's foundation is based on what basically amounts to de facto fascism, and therefore categorically not a "greater good".

Libertarian - Individualist - I'm not sure why you put socialist. Libertarianism is very much so against authority of any type affecting the individual except local authority. They also tend to be economically of a conservative nature and are typically very much against socialist type programs as they are seen as a kind of infringement of individual freedom.

What do you think?


Many people confuse fascism with dictatorships, which is somewhat correct, but not entirely. It is basically state mandated corporatism.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 11:56 PM
link   
reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


One has the Newer Package , but with the same Crap inside...........



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


Liberalism means right wing to us Europeans.

Neo-liberalism means right wing to everyone.



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 08:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Galvatron
 


Well put.

Just expanding a little, Classical Conservatism is also known as Traditional Conservatism.

Paleoconservatism is another type of conservatism here in the US. Emphasis is placed on tradition, limited government, civil society, anti-colonialism, anti-corporatism, anti-federalism, religion and Western identity.

Examples of modern Paleoconservatives are Pat Buchanan and Ted Cruz.



posted on Sep, 30 2013 @ 09:24 PM
link   
reply to OP
 



CB328
As far as I understand it neo-liberal has to do with wanting to push capitalism on other countries- basically the same as neo-conservatism except just not a facade for grabbing power and riches like neo-cons are.

In practical terms, this is pretty much correct.

These, I'm afraid, are wrong:


John_Rodger_Cornman
classical liberal = individualist
neo-liberal = statist socialist
neo-conservative = statist fascist
libertarian = stateless socialist

The confusion is understandable because the usages of 'liberal' and, consequently, 'neoliberal', have changed in recent times, and particularly in America.

A classic liberal is an economic liberal, a believer in property rights and free enterprise. Classic liberals also believe in maximising the freedom of the individual (though not at the expense of others) and curbing the power of the state.

In America nowadays, though, a 'liberal' is basically a social democrat or socialist. It is mainly a term used by right-wing conservatives to abuse their opponents.

A 'neoliberal' used to mean a social democrat, a believer in a strong, interventionist state combined with a market economy. That usage changed in the 1980s. Today a 'neoliberal' is basically a laissez-faire capitalist who believes governments should be as small and impotent as possible. Neoliberalism is the economic philosophy of neoconservatives, libertarians and tax-dodgers.

The Wikipedia entry is clear and very enlightening. Note the section on corrupted neoliberalism. Also see this discussion on the difference between neoliberalism and neoconservatism. Finally, here is a leftish but factually correct account of neoliberalism in practice.

Neoliberalism is an extreme right-wing capitalist economic philosophy.



edit on 30/9/13 by Astyanax because: of tax-dodgers.





new topics
top topics
 
4

log in

join