MV-22 refueling kit to be tested

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posted on Aug, 29 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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Bell Boeing and the Marines are going to test a roll-on/roll-off refueling kit for the MV-22 aircraft. Boeing will pay for the tests, using a Marine aircraft. The system consists of a high speed drogue, hose and reel mechanism.

The current system that will be tested is a non-functional aerodynamic demonstrator made up of off the shelf parts. The Marines are interested in using the system with the F-35. As a substitute they will use an F-18 in place of the F-35 for now.

If the system works the Marines are looking at flying a full squadron of 16 F-35s off an amphibious assault ship, with six MV-22s that can be fitted with this system.


Boeing and the US Marine Corps are testing a new prototype roll-on/roll-off aerial refueling system for the Bell-Boeing MV-22 Osprey this week, a senior USMC officer says.

The system which consists of a high-speed aerial refueling drogue, hose and reel mechanism is being tested on a VMX-22 aircraft, says Col Michael Orr, the squadron's commander. However, the USMC is not paying for the tests itself, rather Boeing is paying for the demonstration, he says.

The system is currently a non-functional aerodynamic demonstrator, Orr says. However, the parts are off the shelf and Orr says he does not expect any hiccups.

Orr says that the USMC is very interested in the system for use with the Lockheed Martin F-35B. Currently, because F-35B test assets are scarce, the USMC is using a Boeing F/A-18 Hornet as a substitute, Orr says.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Aug, 29 2013 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Both being VTOL this could be a very interesting development, close in refueling makes for more frequent and extended loiter time, the F-35 must be a gas guzzler hey? Nice aircraft ,though nothing will replace my Av-8b screen saver



posted on Aug, 30 2013 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I've been on aircraft for in-flight refueling and have always been amazed. But this sounds quite scary concerning the Osprey.

The first thought that came to my mind was sticking my *ahem* into a blender and turning it on.
OUCH! The probe extending from the MV-22 better be a decent length.



posted on Aug, 30 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


Theoretically the refueling drogue would fall kind of between the prop wash areas from the engines. It would also extend back a pretty good way from the back of the aircraft.



posted on Sep, 5 2013 @ 05:32 PM
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Pictures of an MV-22 with the refueling kit installed, and an F-18 in close formation have been released. The Hornet and Osprey were at 210 knots, when the Hornet approached to within 30 feet of the drogue, in an offset position.

Next week, using a different drogue system, they are going to test out low speed proximity for rotorwing aircraft.





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