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Goddess Worship And The Babel Religions

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posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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Originally posted by windword
reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


Are you sure? Why would GOD be threatened by "mud and bricks"?


Where does it say he was "threatened" by anything? I'm looking at the Hebrew right now.




posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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here's another one

‘The Incantation of Nudimmud’ appears in the Sumerian epic Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta (lines 136-55). In Sumerian Nudimmud meant ‘Begetter of mankind’ and was another name for the god Enki. In the East Semitic language Enki’s name was Ea – in West Semitic (including Hebrew) Ayah or Yah. Ea/Yah was the personal name of God, the Creator of the universe and begetter of mankind.

www.earthhistory.org.uk...



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by undo
 


Here's what I'm talking about regarding the Babylonian version. They turn Marduk, Ea's (Enki) son into the more powerful god. The link also shows where at one time, some of the texts showed Enlil as the hero of the story, and somewhere along the way Enki is considered the "trickster god". See what I mean?


After the waters of Apsu and Tiamat mix, the gods Lahmu and Lahamu ("slime, mud") emerge. And from this pair come Anshar ("whole sky") and Kishar ("whole earth"), meaning perhaps "the horizon, the circular rim of heaven and the corresponding circular rim of earth" (Jacobsen 168). Anshar and Kishar give birth to Anu, the sky god, who in turn begets what one translation calls "his likeness" (Heidel 18) Ea, the trickster god of the flowing waters, who is familiar to us as Enki. The following genealogical chart summarizes the creation so far:



He (Marduk) was originally a local Babylonian god who was raised to chief god status when the city of Babylon conquered all of Mesopotamia. Earlier versions of the story may have featured Enlil as the hero, but since this is an official epic, the official god Marduk must be exalted. (Later, when Assyria conquered Babylon, the Assyrian scribe simply replaced Marduk's name with that of his chief god, Ashur.) Marduk's name means "'son-child' or 'son-of-the-sun'" (Sandars 32) or perhaps "bull calf of the sun." Marduk is more powerful than his father, and his physical appearance is impressive: he is very large, with four large eyes and four big ears, the better to see and hear everything. Fire blazes from his mouth when he speaks. His proud and doting grandfather Anu creates the four winds for Marduk to play with, and soon a group of unnamed gods goes to "their mother" Tiamat to complain about the resulting noise and commotion:


faculty.gvsu.edu...



edit on 1-9-2013 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


Most of your examples are examples of RAPE which is not polygamy, but would fall into ployamory.

Incorrect. The Greco-Roman accounts certainly qualify as rape. The Sumerian, Anatolian, Celtic, and Norse do not though.

Nimah, Ninshar, Nindurra, Ningikugal, and Ninimma were all consensual lovers for Enki. It was the jealousy of Ninmah that lead to the trickery when Enki and Uttu were supposed to be lovers. None of Enki's actions could be classified as rape, because every lover he had consented to his advances. The same can be said for Ninmah/Ninhursag/Damkina, who consented to Enki, Enlil, and Marduk during their sexual liaisons. There are accounts of rape in Sumer though, by which we can compare these trysts. For example, Enlil rapes the goddess Sud (who later becomes his wife, Ninlil), and the Anunnaki recognize the immorality of the action by banishing Enlil from Dilmun. The Sumerians understood the difference between rape and love.

In Anatolia Teshub's spouse was determined by region, and population. In the ancient, holy city of Arinna, the center of the Hittite religious movement, he was married to Arinniti, the supreme goddess, goddess of the sun, provider of life. When the Hurrian religious movement came to power, Hebat, goddess of all living beings and queen of the gods, became Teshub's spouse. Not through rape, or any type of sexual liaisons, but just because of the cultural shift and growth and change. Both couplings, Teshub and Arinniti, and Teshub and Hebat, were consented to.

As for the Celts, all you need to do is read the "Wooing of Etain" to see how they looked at multiple-spouse relationships. Midir and Etain both are of the Tuatha de (divine beings). Midir's ex-wife, Fuamach, enchants Etain, turning her into a variety of animals to punish Midir for having left her. Mind you, Etain and Midir were consensual lovers at this point, no one was being raped or forced to do anything against their will. Eventually Etain is swallowed by a human, who becomes pregnant with Etain's human avatar. Growing as a human, Etain marries Eochu Airem, and their relationship is also consensual. Etain is now married to both Midir (as a goddess), and Eochu (as a human), and both are consensual. Eventually Etain returns to her divine self and realm with Midir, but that's beside the point I'm making.

When it comes to the Norse, Oðin was married to Frigg, and Jörð was his consensual lover. By one he had his beloved son, Baldr, by the other he sired the mighty Thor. Frigg was married to both Oðin and Ullr (depending on the season). Finally, Thor was married to Sif, and Járnsaxa was his consensual lover. With Sif Thor sired Thrúðr, a daughter. With Járnsaxa Thor sired Móði and Magni, his two sons that would later claim Mjölnir during the events of Ragnarok. Further, according to actual Viking laws, rape and attempted-rape were punishable by outlawry, which is essentially death. Again, they understood the differences between rape and consensual sexual experiences.

Only in Greece do we find rape. Again, though, as I've said elsewhere: in Greece the penis is almighty. So, if Zeus wanted to rape you, you were supposed to consider it an honor. If you've read any of my other posts on this thread though, you'll also know that I think very lowly of Greek and Roman culture, traditions, etc. So, I'll give you the point concerning the Greek accounts constituting rape, and agree those were not examples of polyandry/polygyny.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by undo
 


no i mean bible prophecy vs. sumerian prophecy. bible prophecy is based, among other things, on precession


I'll concede this point.

Considering the fact that astrology (zodiacal astrology at least) has its birthplace in Greek mythology, you cannot expect the Sumerian predictions to deal with Sagittarius and Scorpio, as the myth of Orion being assaulted by the scorpion does not exist in Sumer, only Greece.

If Deetermined was looking for astrological prophecy, then they should have said so. All they asked for was a prophecy from Sumer that foretold something from the future. I provided one.


the Lord of Heaven is Anu.

Close, but not quite.

An is heaven. Not the lord of Heaven, but Heaven itself.

In Sumerian mythology there are four primordial, self-created, eternal states: the Heavens, the Earth, the World-Sea, and the Sky. Each of the four was personified:

The Heavens were an ethereal realm beyond/before physical existence.
The Heavens were called An (Anu in Babylonian mythology).

The Sky was the feminine counterpart of the Heavens: visible, tangible.
The Sky was called Antu in both Sumer and Babylon.

The World-Sea, also called the Abyss, represented the Persian Gulf.
The World-Sea was called Nammu in Sumer, Apsu/Tiamat in Babylon.

The Earth was the personification of just that: solid ground, fertile land.
The Earth was called Urash in Sumer, and Damkina in Babylon.

An and Nammu gave birth to the first gods: Enlil (air), Nudimmud (water), Ninmah (earth). An and Urash gave birth to the first worldly things: Ninsuna (the ancestral cow goddess, from whom all animals exist), and Nisaba (the first harvest goddess, from whom all manner of crop arise).

This is Sumerian mythology, mind you. Not the Babylonian Enuma Elish. While the Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians were the cultural inheritors of the Sumerian way of life, they were not the same. Many significant changes occur between Sumerian and Babylonian mythology.

Of importance among those changes is the declassification of the four primordial realms. An, Antu, Urash, and Nammu get disbanded, and all of existence is said to come from the cleaving of Tiamat by Marduk. This is a later interpretation of cosmological origination. Tiamat and the battle with Marduk is not Sumerian, and has no root in Sumerian mythology.

The Sumerians were an agrarian culture, focused on sustenance through crops and vegetation, as well as hunting and gathering. The Semitic Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians were imperialistic cultures, whose way of life included war, slavery, farming, shepherding, and kingdoms. The myths, necessary to the times, changed as different people conquered and inherited what had once been the Sumerian empire.


Enlil is the Lord of the Air and owner of planet Earth. Lord of the Command.
Enki is the Lord of earth, clay and water. Lord of wisdom and creation. Savior of humans, multiple times.


Enlil was the Lord of the Heavens and the Earth, put in charge of all that existed by An, who then disappeared into the ether. Enlil would later sire Nanna, Ninurta, and a host of other deities whose functions would classify them as "Anunnaki", of the Great Gods. In turn, Nanna sired Inanna, Utu, Ereshkigal, and more who served as a second generation of Anunnaki. So, the whole line of royal deities comes from Enlil, he is the King of the Gods, the Lord of Heaven, and so on, and so forth.

Enki was the Lord of the Abyss (the Sea), and responsible for all of the things that water affected. This included tides, crops, clay and silt (used for Sumerian cement), water for sustenance, and so on and so forth. When Enlil was banished for raping Sud, Enki was temporarily put in charge of the Earth and Heavens, until Enlil returned with Ninlil (Sud) and amends were made.

The reason that Enki was so popular with the Sumerians is because water, unlike air and earth, was versatile, malleable, and had incalculable uses to them. Water purified, healed, caused things to grow, destroyed villages and crops, cured thirst, washed away uncleanliness, cleaned garments, and so on.

~ Wandering Scribe


edit on 1/9/13 by Wandering Scribe because: misspelled "elish", ha ha



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by Deetermined
 



The reason God needs to proclaim himself as creator of EVERYTHING (including those fallen angels proclaiming themselves to be gods), isn't because he's insecure. It's because he doesn't want the rest of you falling for the lies of these other gods. He doesn't need anyone's praise or blessing, however, we might find some day that we all need his.


The last time I checked, the "blessings" of God lead to... well... all of this. I think I prefer not to worship a bloodthirsty tyrant who commands such heinous crimes.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by Wandering Scribe
 


No, you'd rather worship Enlil, who according to you, was the god of heaven and earth, but was banished for raping Sud. But you probably settled for worshiping some goddess that probably sits lower than Enlil.
edit on 1-9-2013 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by Wandering Scribe
 


No, you'd rather worship Enlil, who according to you, was the god of heaven and earth, but was banished for raping Sud. But you probably settled for worshiping some goddess that probably sits lower than Enlil.
edit on 1-9-2013 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)


Early accounts identify Enlil and Enki as the Lord of the Air and Lord of the Earth respectively which are identified in the Bible as god of Earth and principalities of the air whom are associated with the figure of Satan.

Anu actually most closely matches the titles of the biblical God in being Lord of Heaven, master of the constellations, and creator of all things.

en.wikipedia.org...


In Sumerian mythology, Anu (also An; from Sumerian *An 𒀭 = sky, heaven) was a sky-god, the god of heaven, lord of constellations, king of gods, spirits and demons, and dwelt in the highest heavenly regions. It was believed that he had the power to judge those who had committed crimes, and that he had created the stars as soldiers to destroy the wicked. His attribute was the royal tiara. His attendant and minister of state was the god Ilabrat.

He was one of the oldest gods in the Sumerian pantheon and part of a triad including Enlil (god of the air) and Enki (god of water). He was called Anu by the later Akkadians in Babylonian culture. By virtue of being the first figure in a triad consisting of Anu, Enlil, and Enki (also known as Ea), Anu came to be regarded as the father and at first, king of the gods. Anu is so prominently associated with the E-anna temple in the city of Uruk (biblical Erech) in southern Babylonia that there are good reasons for believing this place to have been the original seat of the Anu cult. If this is correct, then the goddess Inanna (or Ishtar) of Uruk may at one time have been his consort.


So you may as well throw in Anu as being the biblical God in addition to Enlil and Enki . . .

-FBB



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Wandering Scribe
 




An is heaven. Not the lord of Heaven, but Heaven itself.


true that his name means heaven, but i think it's a case of the sky being deified and the two merged into each other in literature. for example, in the legend of the destruction of mankind, an ancient egyptian text, RA is described as having skin like gold, bones like silver and hair like lapis lazuli. this description, oddly enough, is exactly how enki's e.abzu temple is described. it dawned on me that it was possible that RA was EA's egyptian name and that by the time the legend was written, the two had been merged into each other.

or, here's an even better example

prior to the enuma elish, Abzu was underground water, specifically "water" in a gate (its the abyss/bottomless pit), not a god or other sentient being. but in enuma elish, abzu becomes a sentient god-like entity who is the spouse of tiamat.


edit on 1-9-2013 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by Deetermined
 


ah yes, i had noticed that as well. even sitchin recognized it and mentioned it frequently in his earth chronicles series.



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 



So you may as well throw in Anu as being the biblical God in addition to Enlil and Enki . . .


Precisely why NONE of it fits. As you said earlier, these are earthly gods that don't have anything to do with the Biblical God. I'm sure Satan has tried to pawn himself off as the "brother" of Jesus, with equal abilities, since the beginning of time.



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 10:38 PM
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Originally posted by Deetermined
reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 



So you may as well throw in Anu as being the biblical God in addition to Enlil and Enki . . .


Precisely why NONE of it fits. As you said earlier, these are earthly gods that don't have anything to do with the Biblical God. I'm sure Satan has tried to pawn himself off as the "brother" of Jesus, with equal abilities, since the beginning of time.


i don't think enki and enlil are actual brothers, they are just both sons of god and gods as well, depending on what text you read. when jesus said he was jehovah, he wasn't kidding. the jews knew him as jehovah in some places in scripture. this is why they ddn't recognize him when he showed up cause they were expecting the military guy, enlil, but instead got the creator/healer, enki.



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by Deetermined
 


Ah, another baseless accusation from a fool.

Have I said that I worship Enlil?
In fact, have I said that I worship at all?

Why not accuse me of worshiping second-generation Indo European Titans? After all, my avatar is of Hecate, the Afro-Eurasian goddess of cross-roads, fate, sorcery, and childbirth, whose kingdom includes one-third of the Sky, one-third of the Sea, and one-third of the Underworld.

Maybe I worship Hecate?
Do I worship anything at all?

As for Enlil; well, if you finished reading the account (ha, like you'd ever do that!), then you would know that Enlil and Sud make amends.

Sud becomes pregnant with Enlil's child and follows him to Kur, the mountainous realm of danger bordering the world. While there, Enlil repents for having raped her, and chooses to fulfill his duties as a King, and as a father. He takes Sud and elevates her to Queen of the Air, Ninlil, and together they return to Dilmun (paradise). Enlil asks for Enki's forgiveness, to which Enki accepts, and Enlil is welcomed back among his people as King, with his new bride and queen: Sud.

Their son? Nanna, god of the moon, whose wife is Ningal, the Great Lady. Nanna and Ningal's children? None other than Utu (the solar hero), Ishkur (the rain god), Inanna (Queen of Heaven), and Ereshkigal (Queen of Kur). All of them vital deities in Sumerian mythology.

The Anunnaki made amends, all was forgiven, and everybody learned from the experience.

Did Yhvh ever apologize to the Egyptian people when he killed all of their first-borns because Pharaoh denied him? Did you know that not all Egyptian people partook of the ancient Egyptian Pharaonic religion? Some of them were Nubians, with completely different beliefs and worldview from those of the Pharaoh or temple priests. Maybe Yhvh should have apologized for killing their children?

Did Yhvh ever apologize for impregnating Mary? Ever wonder what it must have been like for Joseph, considering that his wife was with child, but it was not his? I wonder why the Bible makes no mention of how that whole situation played out with Joseph, whose wife was, for all intents and purposes, a victim of rape.

How about that whole global flood thing? Did Yhvh personally go to each and every living being (human, animal, insect, plant) and ask it directly if it would be willing to change its ways and honor Him and His system of weird, abstruse, and ridiculous laws? Nope! He just assumed everything everywhere was completely evil and corrupt, and killed it all... except for Noah, of course.

At the end of the day, I would rather worship a pagan deity than that self-righteous, egotistical tyrant you call God. But, because I'm enjoying this, go ahead: keep guessing if I worship, and who I worship. We'll see how close you can get.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by undo
 


In Sumerian mythology An is a personification of the Heavens, the superlunary realm above the sky, where the stars and planets and other celestial bodies move and exist. Antu is the personification of the sky.

The Sumerians made a distinction between the skies and the heavens, a fact that becomes even clearer when you realize the Sumerians thought the sky was a dome placed over the Earth, with tiny holes in it.

Here's a basic graphic of the Sumerian's beliefs concerning the Universe:


You are correct though, that by the time of the Babylonians (who were not the Sumerians, nor their ethnic offspring) An (as Anu) had become simply an ancestral parent figure, a type of All-Father of which the other gods were children. This is not the perception of the Sumerians though. The first Diñgir (decision-maker - deity) of Sumer were Enlil, Nudimmud (Enki), and Ninmah (Ninhursag). An, Antu, Urash, and Nammu are not deities, they are personifications of realms of existence.

The same can be said of the E-Abzu, the "House of Water" in Eridu. E-Abzu began as the temple where Enki lived. It was a building from within which he controlled the waters of the Earth. When the Babylonian scribes composed the Enuma Elish the Apsu was made into a being, the other half of Tiamat, who stood in for Nammu (who is minimally mentioned in Babylonian religion).

Of interest though, is what Enki (Ea) does to Apsu. He enchants him with an eternal slumber, kills him, and then sets his house/temple up inside of Apsu. The Babylonians still arrived at the same conclusion: Enki lives inside of his home: the Apsu. They just personified the Apsu first, something the Sumerians did not do.

~ Wandering Scribe



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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first of all goddess worship is one of the oldest religions in the world ( and may be practiced by people from other planets) secondly THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS JUDEO_CRISTIAN_MUSLIM RELIGION it was made up from Canaanite, Babylon, sumerian, Arcadian, Egyptian, Zoratorism and the akhenaten's sun cult beliefs
thirdly the hatred of women comes from a belief that they possessed more magickal potential



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Wandering Scribe
Did Yhvh ever apologize for impregnating Mary? Ever wonder what it must have been like for Joseph, considering that his wife was with child, but it was not his? I wonder why the Bible makes no mention of how that whole situation played out with Joseph, whose wife was, for all intents and purposes, a victim of rape.

How about that whole global flood thing? Did Yhvh personally go to each and every living being (human, animal, insect, plant) and ask it directly if it would be willing to change its ways and honor Him and His system of weird, abstruse, and ridiculous laws? Nope! He just assumed everything everywhere was completely evil and corrupt, and killed it all... except for Noah, of course.

At the end of the day, I would rather worship a pagan deity than that self-righteous, egotistical tyrant you call God. But, because I'm enjoying this, go ahead: keep guessing if I worship, and who I worship. We'll see how close you can get.

~ Wandering Scribe


I hope you are acknowledging the fact that the pagan gods you are talking about preferring to worship if you had to were rapists, also sent a flood to kill everyone, and also display extreme self-righteousness.

You claim to know so much and then go on such a childish rant . . . it really detracts from your credibility as an individual.

-FBB



posted on Sep, 1 2013 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


that depends on which group of gods you are talking about most of them were benevolent towards humans



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


The whole point of my statement there seems to have gone over your head.

Both Enlil and Yhvh sent a global flood to erase humanity from the Earth. Both Enlil and Yhvh committed adultery. Both Enlil and Yhvh were supposedly responsible for allowing kingdoms to fall to barbarous invaders when their people were being blasphemous.

Yet, for some reason, the Christians and Jews have no problem proclaiming the moral superiority of their deity over the pagan deities that his actions and personality are based on.

Also, as truthontheloose above said, not all pagan deities were responsible for rape and world-wide floods.

In the Sumerian and Babylonian accounts Enlil is responsible for the flood, and he commands one of a variety of rain-gods (like Ishkur, or Adad) to carry out the deed against their will. Further, Enki, as an example of a pagan deity's multifaceted personality, goes against Enlil's wishes and warns Ziusudra/Utnapishtam about the coming flood.

Plenty of pagan deities were capable of empathy and understanding, of benevolence and protection. Just look at Hadad (Ba'al-Hadad) who personally went to the Underworld and died all in an attempt to get Mot, the lord of famine and drought, to lift his curse on the Earth so the people of Canaan wouldn't starve.

~ Wandering Scribe


edit on 2/9/13 by Wandering Scribe because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by Wandering Scribe
reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


The whole point of my statement there seems to have gone over your head.

Both Enlil and Yhvh sent a global flood to erase humanity from the Earth. Both Enlil and Yhvh committed adultery. Both Enlil and Yhvh were supposedly responsible for allowing kingdoms to fall to barbarous invaders when their people were being blasphemous.

Yet, for some reason, the Christians and Jews have no problem proclaiming the moral superiority of their deity over the pagan deities that his actions and personality are based on.

Also, as truthontheloose above said, not all pagan deities were responsible for rape and world-wide floods.

In the Sumerian and Babylonian accounts Enlil is responsible for the flood, and he commands one of a variety of rain-gods (like Ishkur, or Adad) to carry out the deed against their will. Further, Enki, as an example of a pagan deity's multifaceted personality, goes against Enlil's wishes and warns Ziusudra/Utnapishtam about the coming flood.

Plenty of pagan deities were capable of empathy and understanding, of benevolence and protection. Just look at Hadad (Ba'al-Hadad) who personally went to the Underworld and died all in an attempt to get Mot, the lord of famine and drought, to lift his curse on the Earth so the people of Canaan wouldn't starve.

~ Wandering Scribe


edit on 2/9/13 by Wandering Scribe because: (no reason given)


Your comment came after another posted commented on you preferring the worship of Enlil . . . . and then you go on a rant about all the horrible things the Christian God did and/or allowed to happen as if they had nothing to do with the gods you were claiming He is a perversion of.

You never recognize that the figure of Christ represented the prophesied savior of mankind promised by the God of the Bible. The distinction of Christianity is that it recognizes Yehoshua as that savior whom embodied the unending love of a creator God.

I am really just pointing out the arrogant hatred you and many other posters here have towards Christianity which you always try to excuse away with the actions of self-proclaimed Christians that you find distasteful.

Personally I find the biblical Christ to be the greatest embodiment of love ever presented in any religious or spiritual context and would challenge you to argue otherwise. I would certainly stop pestering posters like you if you could do such a thing.

-FBB



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 03:57 AM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


Your comment came after another posted commented on you preferring the worship of Enlil

Deetermined only thinks I worship Enlil because I know so much about him. The reality is, I know as much about hundreds of other deities, dozens of other myths, and numerous other religious systems as I do about Enlil.

The reason I am focusing on Enlil, instead of Odin, or Horus, or Quetzalcoatl, is because Enlil was already brought up in this thread, and Enlil is one of the deities on which Yhvh is based.

Two birds, one stone.


and then you go on a rant about all the horrible things the Christian God did and/or allowed to happen as if they had nothing to do with the gods you were claiming He is a perversion of.

Interestingly enough, the Sumerians were aware that their myths were stories. In fact, many pagan cultures knew that they were story-tellers, and not historians.

When the Sumerians talk about Enlil sending the deluge it is not meant to be historical, but moral: a message to humanity. The same in the Babylonian epic. Gilgamesh and his adventures, while perhaps based on a real king, are actually meant to warn human beings against the folly of seeking immortality.

The same with a figure like Ba'al-Hadad. His descent, death, and rebirth were allegorical: a graphic illustration explaining the spiritual processes of visible natural phenomenon. The Canaanites did not actually believed that every winter Hadad died.

But then you come to the Christians, and Yhvh. They believe that the flood is a literal recounting of history. They believe that every single ethnicity came from two people in the Garden of Eden. They believe that there is a literal Hell where finite crimes are treated with infinite punishment. To the Christian and the Jew the stories in their Bible are not stories, but an actual recounting of a historical event.

So, if the myth of Enlil sending the deluge is a morality tale, but the story of Noah and the ark is actual history, then who does deserve the blame for the heinous act? The one who wrote a story about it, or the one who did it in real life?


You never recognize that the figure of Christ represented the prophesied savior of mankind promised by the God of the Bible.

Because if he was, then the Jews who wrote all of those prophecies, would recognize him as the messiah as well.

Instead, only a small portion of them (the Jews for Jesus) do. The majority say Jesus did not fulfill the prophecies, and is not the messiah.

This is why the world has Judaism, in all its varied denominations, and then Christianity, in all its myriad denominations: the Jews and the Christians do not agree on Jesus being the messiah.


The distinction of Christianity is that it recognizes Yehoshua as that savior whom embodied the unending love of a creator God.

Luke 12:47
Mark 4:11-12
Mark 5:12-13
Mark 7:9
Matthew 5:17
Matthew 10:21
Matthew 10:34
Matthew 11:20
Matthew 15:4-7
Matthew 19:29

In those verses Jesus advocates beating slaves, abandoning children, neglecting family because of religious belief, abusing and killing innocent animals, killing children, and various other things which could not, in any way, shape, or form, be construed as loving. Further, in Matthew 5:18-19 Jesus has this to say:


"For truly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass the law until all is accomplished. Whoever then relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but he who does them and teaches them shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven."


The above passage is Jesus advocating for all of the Old Testament laws. He says that whoever does not teach and abide by the old covenant, as well as the new, shall be "called least in the kingdom of heaven". So, the rape, slavery, murder, and other horrible things taught in Leviticus or Deuteronomy? Jesus fully approves and endorses them.

If you want to cherry-pick the Bible, pointing out only the benign stuff Christ says and does, that's fine. That's what Christians already do. It makes you no different from the average church goer. It does not mean your "peace and love for everyone" interpretation of Christ is Biblical though.

Also, try watching this video for more information on the "evil" side of Jesus:



~ Wandering Scribe



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