Another Bird Flu is found in China that can jump cross species....H7N7........

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posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 12:36 AM
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New Chinese Bird Flu May Be Worse Than H7N9 Virus

www.theepochtimes.com...


A team of Hong Kong researchers found the virus in about 25 percent of the fowl sampled, many of which also had the H7N9 virus. By testing the H7N7 virus on ferrets, the researchers found that it can be transmitted to mammals.


“If (we) let this H7N7 continue circulating in chickens, I am sure that human infection cases will occur,” study co-author Guan Yi at the University of Hong Kong told AFP. “This virus could cause more severe infection than … H7N9, based on our animal experiment.”



“We think it is scary for humans,” Guan added. “Our entire human population almost has no antibodies against the H7 subtype of influenza virus. Thus, if it causes pandemic outbreak, it will kill many people.”


Well if it is not something starting with an "H" then it is something starting with an "S" (Syria)...In Asia Chicken, Duck, and Pig are eaten more than anything else with rice. Cattle take up to much room to feed and take care of...It was surprising that 25% of all chickens tested had either the H7N7 or the H7N9 virus.....!




posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 01:18 AM
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Oil of Oregano
Olive Leaf extract
Colloidal silver
Ascorbic Acid (powdered)
Grapefruit seed extract
Elderberry
Hydrogen peroxide
Grape juice 100%
Beet Root
COQ10
Goldenseal root extract
Pau D' arco extract

I keep all these in my supplies and more. When swine flu was going around, I took some of these in rotation when others around me were getting sick. If something comes my way, I feel pretty confident relying on these.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 02:43 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 

By jumping from mammal to mammal do you mean mutating to cross or just contracting the flu?

People can get bird flu from birds, but it yet has to prove virulent from person to person; unless both people had contact with the same bird, its blood or feathers. Which is possible since many people living in Asia bring live birds home to slaughter for the pot. Saves on refrigeration if the birds are transported live. May spread the disease to any who contact the bird.

We can begin to worry when the CDC announces no flights out of some region or city in the Far East.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 04:44 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 



Hmmmm!

By the time the CDC announces no flights etc etc I think you will find it will be too late anyway.

Natural antibiotics and anti virals are your best defence here

Reds

PDUK



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by PurpleDog UK
reply to post by intrptr
 



Hmmmm!

By the time the CDC announces no flights etc etc I think you will find it will be too late anyway.

Natural antibiotics and anti virals are your best defence here

Reds

PDUK

If / when a new strain breaks out they won't have stocks of that yet... beacuse its "new". Takes months to isolate, develop any serum and grow enough for millions. Meanwhile, the disease spreads unchecked except by quarantine and millions die. Thats the main reason they call them plagues.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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even if there's a breakout you'd never know because of media censorship



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by Taissa
Oil of Oregano
Olive Leaf extract
Colloidal silver
Ascorbic Acid (powdered)
Grapefruit seed extract
Elderberry
Hydrogen peroxide
Grape juice 100%
Beet Root
COQ10
Goldenseal root extract
Pau D' arco extract

I keep all these in my supplies and more. When swine flu was going around, I took some of these in rotation when others around me were getting sick. If something comes my way, I feel pretty confident relying on these.


I know about 2/3rd of those you mentioned and use some of them. I'll look up the others.

Another one to note would be naturally fermented foods.

During all of the bird flu fracas, infected chickens were fed kimchi and recovered. Apparently real fermented kimchi has specific properties (by-products of the fermentation process) that provide some antagonism to the virus and helps victims recover faster.

Foods that are fermented and have a high resulting lactic acid content become pickled. This was done in the past with salt,water and natural bacterial action. That's how the "good" saurkraut is made and how many fermented and preserved foods are made. (as opposed to pickling in vinegar)



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by Taissa
 


I have most of these but have found what works best for me everytime I start getting a sniffle or headache is fresh finger tea (juicer from real ginger). Others have said it tastes like pepper but it works. I've also heard apple cider vinegar.
I wish I knew how to make fermented foods. Love the indian one dosa but its a complex process. There is a lot of evidence they help.

It seems this bird flu just keeps on mutating. They need to feed these chickens this fermented food someone spoke of if if it worked. Or stop touching chickens without gloves. Spreading human to human was discovered in other strains so don't they have safe food handling practices in place yet?



posted on Nov, 4 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Missed this UPDATE. H7N7 bird flu found in chickens at an Arkansas supplier to Tyson Foods, the USA’s largest processor of chicken.


Russia lifts ban on Arkansas poultry

Arkansas poultry imports banned by Russia and Japan after a grower farm in Scott County tested positive for the H7N7 virus, have resumed.

The infected farm was under contract for meat giant Tyson Foods, the nation’s largest processor of chicken.



posted on Nov, 4 2013 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by Taissa
 


what no garlic? no i am not being smart ass , garlic does help in some viruses, the flu is one, also some chicken broth, red pepper pepper, the red chilly pepper, vitamin b12



posted on Nov, 4 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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oh come now this is not the first time h7n7 has made an jump and this was not in a lab, oldie but goody www.cdc.gov... from the link

uman Cases of Avian Influenza A (H7N7) Infection - The Netherlands, 2003
This website is archived and is no longer being maintained or updated. For updated information on avian influenza, see the CDC Avian Influenza website and the World Health Organization (WHO) Avian Influenza Situation Update page.
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Background
Since the end of February 2003, the Netherlands has been reporting outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N7) in poultry on several farms. More recently, there have been reports of H7N7 infections among pigs and humans in the Netherlands, and among birds in Belgium and Germany. While it is unusual for people to get influenza infections directly from animals, sporadic human infections and limited outbreaks caused by avian influenza A viruses, including H7N7, have been reported. When such infections are identified, public health authorities monitor the situation closely. Because influenza H7N7 viruses do not commonly infect humans, there is little or no antibody protection against these viruses in the human population. If an avian or other animal influenza virus is able to infect people, cause illness, and spread efficiently from person to person, an influenza pandemic could begin. Additional information on human infections with avian influenza viruses can be found here.

Human Cases of H7N7 Infection in The Netherlands
As of April 25, 2003, the National Influenza Center in The Netherlands reported that 83 confirmed cases of human H7N7 influenza virus infections had occurred among poultry workers and their families since the H7N7 outbreak began in chickens at the end of February 2003. The vast majority (79) of these people had conjunctivitis, and 6 of those with conjunctivitis also reported influenza-like illness (ILI) symptoms (e.g., fever, cough, muscle aches). One person had ILI only (no conjunctivitis) and 2 persons had mild illness that could not be classified as ILI or conjunctivitis. In addition, one individual, a 57-year-old veterinarian who visited one of the affected farms in early April, died on April 17 of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and related complications from H7N7 infection. Dutch authorities have reported evidence of possible transmission of H7N7 influenza from 2 poultry workers to 3 family members. All 3 family members had conjunctivitis and one also had ILI.
now that is in a lab get ready for the pandemic, china has its new pop reduction with out war toy too play with





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