Understanding Tesla's Inventions

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posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 06:03 AM
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Originally posted by MrInquisitive
I believe he also thought the sun ran on electricity.


and apparantly so do a few more contemporary thinkers
www.electricuniverse.info...




posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by MrInquisitive
 



Did you look carefully at the bottom video you posted? The conducted energy dropped down considerably by moving the device with the lightbulb just a few more inches away.

Did you read the text in that post? All of those videos show electromagnetic induction and were supposed to demonstrate the limits of modern wireless energy transmission technology, as compared to Tesla's much more efficient technology which is not limited to only a few feet.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by MrInquisitive
I believe he also thought the sun ran on electricity.


and apparantly so do a few more contemporary thinkers
www.electricuniverse.info...

That's a good point but personally I don't agree with much of the electric universe theory. However I don't think Tesla ever said the Sun runs on electricity, I believe what MrInquisitive is referring to is the claim Tesla made about being able to extract electrical energy from the Sun by building a device which would operate at the resonant frequency of the Sun (although there is no record of such a device and I'm not sure if Tesla did actually make that claim).
edit on 26/8/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: sorry got your names mixed up there



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 06:11 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
Tesla's device is perfectly capable of transmitting energy to millions of homes and businesses, if you read my full post you would know that. And you would also know that the round objects are metallic spheres not balloons and they do not have to be flown to a high altitude.
From the top of page 3:

www.teslascience.net...

Terminal D, preferably of large surface, formed or maintained by such means as a balloon at an elevation suitable for the purposes of transmission.


So when Tesla says it's formed or maintained by such means as a balloon, how can you accuse me of not reading the material, and say they aren't balloons? The only out I see is a metal sphere elevated by a balloon in which case you still have balloons, but he also allows for D and D' to be balloons themselves (the balloons could have a conductive coating for example).

Also it seems Tesla didn't state exactly how high he wanted the balloons to be, so he was ambiguous about the altitude, only saying that they didn't need to be as high as 15 miles, but some altitude less than that would suffice, but he never gives a number that I saw other than the 15 miles.


Originally posted by Phage
Or maybe Tesla did not envision a balloon on every house but a system similar to that used now, with his wireless system replacing long distance transmission lines but with wired systems for local distribution.
I wouldn't rule it out, but honestly I'm not sure exactly what Tesla was thinking in this regard.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 06:29 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
So when Tesla says it's formed or maintained by such means as a balloon, how can you accuse me of not reading the material, and say they aren't balloons? The only out I see is a metal sphere elevated by a balloon in which case you still have balloons, but he also allows for D and D' to be balloons themselves (the balloons could have a conductive coating for example).

Ok that is a fair point, I can see why you would think was referring to actual balloons. If you read the patent for the Wardenclyffe tower it will become clear what he meant however. The Wardenclyffe tower used an array of many small metallic spheres as the antenna and didn't need any part of it to be elevated. Tesla always used metallic spheres because they have a large conducting surface and that is why people use metallic spheres when they replicate his patents. Just watch some of the demonstrational videos I have posted and you'll see that it's only a metallic sphere which does not have to be elevated very high. As I said, the antenna doesn't necessarily need to be attached, it will work without it to some degree but it works much better with an antenna which has a large conducting surface.


The terminal D consists of a suitably shaped metallic frame, in this case a ring of nearly circular cross section, which is covered with half spherical metal plates P P, this constituting a very large conducting surface, smooth on all places where the electric charge principally accumulates.

~ Patent No. 1,119,732



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
Ok that is a fair point, I can see why you would think was referring to actual balloons. If you read the patent for the Wardenclyffe tower it will become clear what he meant however.
I referred to the illustration YOU posted in your OP, and he IS referring to balloons in that illustration.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
Ok that is a fair point, I can see why you would think was referring to actual balloons. If you read the patent for the Wardenclyffe tower it will become clear what he meant however.
I referred to the illustration YOU posted in your OP, and he IS referring to balloons in that illustration.

Both devices are based on the exact same principle, the Wardenclyffe tower is simply a scaled up version of the device. So imo it's pretty obvious that it's meant to be a metal sphere and not a balloon, and the reason it's supposed to be a metal sphere is because it plays the exact same role as the array of half-spheres on the top of the Wardenclyffe. Tesla probably used the term balloon in the patent to mean a hollow sphere and nothing more. You do realize that if it were a balloon made of a rubber material it wouldn't conduct electricity? The line travelling to the "balloon" is not a "line", it's a solid metallic antenna with a solid metallic sphere placed on the top... and if that's wrong then everyone has been building them incorrectly for decades. When he says it should be elevated he means it should be somewhat elevated like any normal antenna to ensure efficient transmission.
edit on 26/8/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by alldaylong
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Tesla was not the inventor of AC current. That honour goes to Michael Faraday. In fact i would put Faraday ahead of Tesla in many fields. That includes the field of electromagnetism and AC current. Because Faraday was not an American you are not taught about him:-

en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 25-8-2013 by alldaylong because: (no reason given)


Actually neither of them invented the AC wave. It was discovered. And neither of them are American. And we were taught about Tesla's AC system in school.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by alldaylong
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Tesla was not the inventor of AC current. That honour goes to Michael Faraday. In fact i would put Faraday ahead of Tesla in many fields. That includes the field of electromagnetism and AC current. Because Faraday was not an American you are not taught about him:-

en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 25-8-2013 by alldaylong because: (no reason given)


Faraday discovered it, Tesla made use of it. Faraday is taught, but Tesla is not.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


I've always been intrigued by Tesla's 'thinkings'. I've also found that being intelligent is a relative term. You can gain knowledge by what is written in a book thus the term "Book-smart" or you can gain knowledge through your own imagination. Either way, knowledge is all based on nothing but a thought, be it written or not.


This thread is in Skunkworks and I think pertains to this discussion. A little 'fuel to the fire' so to speak.-

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by MrInquisitive
I believe he also thought the sun ran on electricity.


and apparantly so do a few more contemporary thinkers
www.electricuniverse.info...


The "electric universe theory" looks good on initial examination, but completely falls apart when looked at more closely. As you dig deeper into it you encounter enough holes to make a piece of Swiss cheese look solid.



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


You seem to not understand the why of Edison not liking Tesla's invention of wireless power transmission. There was never a question of whether it worked or not. The question was how do you bill people for it. It is radiative and travels in all directions from the source. If you're putting it out there you can't control who gets it. It's not free in the sense that it doesn't cost to produce, it's free in the sense that you can't charge the end user.

So you end up coming to either charging everyone via a tax of some sort, or you give it away for free. Tesla was about giving it away for free and Edison was like "Hell no, we won't go"....

IT sucks cause that would have made the gas powered automobile useless, and we wouldn't give a crap about the middle east right now.

And THAT is why you don't see it in use today. can't make any money off of it and you would destroy the traditional power (especially portable power) industry straight up.

Jaden



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by Masterjaden
 


It is radiative and travels in all directions from the source.
Sort of. And that is what would make such a system so gawdawful inefficient.


It's not free in the sense that it doesn't cost to produce, it's free in the sense that you can't charge the end user.
Nonsense. Of course you can. You need a receiving station to make use of the transmitted electrical energy. Here's how Tesla envisioned it in his odd way.

Therefore, if I pass my current into the earth, the energy of the current is stored there as electromagnetic momentum of the vibrations and is not consumed until I put a receiver at a distance, when it will begin to draw the energy and it will go to that point and nowhere else.

www.tfcbooks.com...



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


while I have some tesla tech and was a great admirer, my reading of history is that all of the geniuses of history were directly guided by supernatural influences.

Tesla was in constant communication with someone other-dimensional. His inventions and insights were often given to him fully formed.

According to Livy, Hannibal was guided by a being and visions of a snake. Alexander, Descartes, nuke scientists, etc, all guided by supernatural, who appear to be leading us towards technocratic enslavement, for the most part, unwittingly.

interesting that the word "genius" comes from djinn, as in alladins lamp...




posted on Aug, 27 2013 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by Masterjaden
 



There was never a question of whether it worked or not. The question was how do you bill people for it.

That's actually a good point and something I should have pointed out in my opening post. I think it would be possible to bill people to a certain degree by placing meters on the receiving devices but the real problem is that anyone can build a receiving device and tune it to the the same resonant frequency as the transmitting station. The transmitting station might be able to detect the extra power draw but it wouldn't be able to detect where the device was located, but if someone attempts to tap into a power line they can detect where the line has been tampered with fairly easily.


It is radiative and travels in all directions from the source. If you're putting it out there you can't control who gets it.

That's not quite how it works. Normal electromagnetic radiation travels out in all directions from the source, that is why the signal grows weaker proportional to the square of the distance. A radio station is a good example, it sends out a powerful signal in all directions which anyone within a certain radius of the transmitter can pick up. You could even build a device which harvests all the ambient electromagnetic radiation floating around the air a draw a little bit of power from it, maybe enough to light a LED if you're lucky.

However Tesla didn't believe that his waves propagated out in all directions like electromagnetic waves do, he believed that by having the devices in resonance he could send electric waves between them with virtually no losses at all (as shown in the diagram titled "resonant circuit with open capacitor"). It's a targeted transfer of energy, in Phage's last post he has a quote by Tesla where he says the energy goes exactly to where it needs to go and no where else, that is why it's so much more efficient than typical electromagnetic waves.
edit on 27/8/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2013 @ 01:53 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


I can tell you from known antenna theory that, if the distance between the transmitter and receiver is greater than a quarter wave length (c/f), then, the system will radiate energy into space just like an antenna.



posted on Aug, 29 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by happykat39
As you dig deeper into it you encounter enough holes to make a piece of Swiss cheese look solid.


have you seen the radiation signature of the universe?


if there's nothing electrical about it then where does the Sun's magnetic plasma came from?
zeenews.india.com...



posted on Aug, 29 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
Here's how Tesla envisioned it in his odd way.



you have some nerve calling his way odd. couldn't be that you just don't get it in your own odd way right?



posted on Dec, 10 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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Phage

In conclusion, there is nothing extraordinary about the Wardenclyffe tower apart from the fact that it could transmit power around the world wirelessly. That is still quite extraordinary however, and it's the real reason why the funding for the Wardenclyffe tower was pulled.


The actual purpose of Wardenclyffe was as a wireless communications device. Funding for Wardenclyffe was not pulled. He spent all the money he was given and still couldn't get it to work.

The trouble with trying to transmit electricity through earth is that it is frightfully inefficient. Since it is a non- directional system energy loss is phenomenal (inverse square) and that doesn't even take into account the variations in conductivity which occur with varying soil/rock conditions.


And no, electricity does not travel faster than light. Just another example of how Tesla missed the boat with his lack of understanding of electromagnetic radiation.


Both Correct and Incorrect.

Yes it was indeed a wireless communications device but it was also a proof of concept of wireless power transmission.

It was also found in Telsa's personal notes that he was in communication with the US government and military on a very similar design that could be used to ZAP enemy aircraft out of the skies.

Tesla was beaten to the communications race finish line and disappeared from scientific limelight...

It's such a shame... Tesla's ability to think non linearly gave him the ability to create in a way that was beyond any other, his intuition led thought processes is still lacking in the scientific community today.

Tesla is a great hero of mine and we could all learn to take a page out of his book when facing drudgery in our research.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 05:03 AM
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pharaohsdidit.wordpress.com...…-be-used-right/





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