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posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's what the words represent.


The word in Latin represents hunting.

But according to you it now represents everything from Venus, to wine, to eggplants, to bruises, to Cupid.


How is it to be wrong ?


Maybe you can tell everyone pespella fabricatus.


It was my mistake for bringing it up...


That is for goddamn sure.


...I gave the explenation so people don't think I'm a liar...


Yeah, I think that boat sailed allllllooooong time ago.


...it's about all you will get from me.


Well, I will give you credit, you gave everything BUT a Latin sentence with the word in it. You win the prize for avoiding an answer and using the most bandwith.



edit on 26-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.




posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

That is your opinion alone, it represents a meaning.
The word venator it's self means that, what sentence, when you say venator it means dark as a bruise as a meaning.





Well, I will give you credit, you gave everything BUT a Latin sentence with the word in it. You win the prize for avoiding an answer and using the most bandwith.

My statement was that it may mean a bruise, it is my original statement, as a meaning, it is so, hunting is like bruising.



Maybe you can tell everyone pespella fabricatus.

I don't fabricate things, like the series on the money stating it's the date it was "fabricated" now that is a fabrication and it belongs to you. It must be from the stuff you are drinking.

I'll tell you what you did, you highjacked this thread to cover for the other things that have been posted in this thread. You know make pages up, cover it.


edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
That is your opinion alone, it represents a meaning.


No. That is the dictionary defintion of EVERY Latin dictionary.


The word venator it's self means that, what sentence, when you say venator it means dark as a bruise as a meaning.


No, when you say 'venator' in Latin you say 'hunter' in Latin, 'bruise' is a completely different word.


My statement was that it may mean a bruise, it is my original statement, as a meaning, it is so, hunting is like bruising.


Yes, just like early man was 'bruiser/gatherers', makes total sense.


I don't fabricate things...


The facts point to another conclusion my inventive friend.

I'll tell you what you did, you highjacked this thread...

Remember pepsella fabricatus mendaxus, you were the one who pretended to know Latin and could not even answer a single question in Latin or compose a simple question in the same language. It is you who is the derailer, it is you who high-jacked.


edit on 27-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Hunting may mean bruising, I have gave you the explenation, from latin vena "blood vain"
I did not invent things. That may be your opinion, it's just your opinion.



That is the dictionary defintion of EVERY Latin dictionary.

It is a saying, a meaning there for it does not appear into the dictionary. Not everything has to be into the dictionary.





edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Hunting may mean bruising...


It 'may', in pepsella fabricatus land.


That may be your opinion, it's just your opinion.


The dictionary is not an 'opinion', it is fact, deal with it.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78

Pepsi Dear--

There is NO SUCH THING as a 'blood vain' - the modern English word 'VAIN' means 'empty' or 'devoid of value' (much like your ATS postings) as in the expression 'all in vain' - (cf: Latin, 'in vanvm') like your ATS postings - it derives from the Latin word VANVS, 'empty' which is cognate with Sanskrit VNA, 'deficient' (as in your ATS postings) - Old Persian has VANG meaning 'empty, nothing, of no value'

Learn to spell...better yet, learn ANYTHING about the roots of modern languages, then you can come back and post...

Until then....well...'nuff said !!



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by Sigismundus
reply to post by pepsi78

Pepsi Dear--

There is NO SUCH THING as a 'blood vain' - the modern English word 'VAIN' means 'empty' or 'devoid of value' (much like your ATS postings) as in the expression 'all in vain' - (cf: Latin, 'in vanvm') like your ATS postings - it derives from the Latin word VANVS, 'empty' which is cognate with Sanskrit VNA, 'deficient' (as in your ATS postings) - Old Persian has VANG meaning 'empty, nothing, of no value'

Learn to spell...better yet, learn ANYTHING about the roots of modern languages, then you can come back and post...

Until then....well...'nuff said !!


The word vein, comes from VIN it is how it was invented, then VENA as in dual vein and blood. Like venetia where the water flows in the chanels like blood flows into the vain. The word Vin became Vena because wine was like blood so there for blood in the blood vein. The blood vein is a good description.

What you state there is invalid.


The term wine is derived from the sanskrit verb vena love, which also stems from the latin name of the goddess venus.

www.wineandfood.eu...
Wine is derived from that not what you speak of, there is a connection but not how you imply it, there for from latin VIN to VENA.
edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Well that is your opinion masonicus drunkus vodkatus.



The dictionary is not an 'opinion', it is fact, deal with it

The dictionary states it comes from blood veins, it's what it says.
edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Well that is your opinion...


Dictionaries do not offer opinion. They offer fact. That is why you can not find one to support your fabricated position.


drunkus vodkatus.


Contraxi aliquid sitis.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Dictionary says I'm right, it talks about a blood vein. The description of a bruise implies a damaged vein.
Anything that blood flows thru is a vein, a chanel. You got big veins and small veins.

Plus all the descriptions that have been provided to you, that of course makes sense.

It's "Vena"T from Vin blood and veins vena.

edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
[Dictionary says I'm right...


Sorry. No Latin dicitonary says you are correct. You are acting delusionally. Let it go. You can not even speak Latin, let alone try to translate it for everyone.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


It does not say i'm incorrect, it's what a bruise is, splatered blood.

Here you go.




You can not even speak Latin, let alone try to translate it for everyone.

I can understand it better than you.
edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It does not say i'm incorrect...


I have been asking you for pages to post a LATIN dictionary entry where it says that 'venat-' is defined as 'bruise' or to use it in a Latin sentence in the context you allege it to have. YOU HAVE DONE NEITHER.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 



That is the latin entry, Vena from Vin, a blood vein, because wine is like blood.

Venat from Vena and from Vin.




edit on 27-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
That is the latin entry, Vena from Vin, a blood vein, because wine is like blood.


No, you made that up because your theory is weak. You have no link to any Latin dictionary that says 'venta-' equalls anything execpt 'hunting'. Remember what you said earlier about using links or do I need to bring your quote back up again?

Sorry. Try again pepsella mendaxus.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


There is nothing made up, it's what a bruise is just a bunch of blood from damaged veins.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
...it's what a bruise is just a bunch of blood from damaged veins.


So? It does not mean 'hunt' in Latin.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Hunt in latin is just like a bruise because I told you it is related to blood and veins.
From VIN to VENA to Venus. where hunting comes from.

Other interpretation of this are the Archer Venus leaving a bruise when hunting.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:30 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Hunt in latin is just like a bruise...


Maybe in Ficto-Latin but you have yet to post a REAL Latin dicitonary entry that says 'venta-' equals 'bruise'.

How long are you going to perpetrate a fraud pepsella fabricatus habitualus?



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

You finaly admited your defeat, we shall now take over the universe, Lol.

Venat is just like bruising, look on what you posted.






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