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baphomet

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posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:39 AM
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No, the triple tau is not associated with the Templars.

The triple tau serves a connection to the (seal of solomon), it is asociated with the knight templars and solomon.
It's where it comes from, like I said roslyn chaple says something else.




posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
The triple tau serves a connection to the (seal of solomon), it is asociated with the knight templars and solomon.
It's where it comes from, like I said roslyn chaple says something else.




The triple tau is not connected to Solomon, nor to the Knights Templar.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:50 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
From the dictionary:



Origin:
1575–85; < Latin versiōn- (stem of versiō ) a turning, equivalent to vers ( us ) (past participle of vertere to turn; see verse) + -iōn- -ion


Version=to turn.


Nice of you to use the ENGLISH dicitonary again. Nothing about a latin word for 'version' though. You keep sucking up that bandwith.




To bad you initially insisted it meant to 'turn a verse' or 'add a verse'. Everyone already knows that 'vertere' means 'to turn'.

I stated that adversary meant to add another version, as in an addon, I stand by what I stated.


You keep standing by that (your opinion). I will stand by the Latin dictionary which says otherwise.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

It is not my opinion, it's what the dictionary states, it states that Version comes from the notion of to turn, turning, then it's what version means, to turn. As for the "other version" you have been provided with a Latin lexicon version also that states very well that Latin version comes from medieval Latin, that in turn comes from an act of turning.

Version=to turn.

Adversary is to add another version, to turn.



edit on 14-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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It is not my opinion, it's what the dictionary states, it states that Version comes from the notion of to turn, turning, then it's what version means, to turn. As for the "other version" you have been provided with a Latin lexicon version also that states very well that Latin version comes from medieval Latin, that in turn comes from an act of turning.

Version=to turn.

Adversary is to add another version, to turn.

It's simple, the world is built on crap, then other crap on top of it, while adding yet another crap on to the other, until we deluded our selfs far far away from the truth, all done by the adversary.
It's the notion of forggeting, from FOR - GET, getting all the material and adding on.
You may spill your roman crap on others but not on me.



edit on 14-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It is not my opinion, it's what the dictionary states, it states that Version comes from the notion of to turn, turning, then it's what version means, to turn.


Who cares what it comes from? You said that it meant 'add-a-verse' in Latin which it does not. You post so much nonesense you eventually forget what your original point is and run around in a circle (anus).


As for the "other version" you have been provided with a Latin lexicon version also that states very well that Latin version comes from medieval Latin, that in turn comes from an act of turning.


Latin does not come from Medieval Latin. Medieval Latin comes from Latin. You are so lost in the world of language it is truly sad. The historical usage of the word predates the Medieval period by more than a millenia. Learn some history.


Version=to turn.

Adversary is to add another version, to turn.


Wrong. It clearly states that it means 'turn toward'.


It's simple, the world is built on crap, then other crap on top of it, while adding yet another crap on to the other, until we deluded our selfs far far away from the truth, all done by the adversary.


Nobody is interested in your childish cynicism.


It's the notion of forggeting, from FOR - GET, getting all the material and adding on.


You going to butcher another word now?


You may spill your roman crap on others but not on me.


What does that even mean?



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 02:13 PM
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Who cares what it comes from? You said that it meant 'add-a-verse' in Latin which it does not. You post so much nonesense you eventually forget what your original point is and run around in a circle (anus).

Yes adversary comes from adverse. ad-verse.



Latin does not come from Medieval Latin. Medieval Latin comes from Latin. You are so lost in the world of language it is truly sad. The historical usage of the word predates the Medieval period by more than a millenia. Learn some history.

Medieval Latin is Latin, the notion comes from the classical Latin to turn into medieval Latin as version.



Wrong. It clearly states that it means 'turn toward'.

To turn means version


www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.

It's how the word evolved, from Latin to turn, into medieval Latin version, then into french then English version.

Version=To turn.

Adversary= Add another version.

edit on 14-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Yes adversary comes from adverse. ad-verse.


Ad-verse DOES NOT EQUAL add-a-verse despite what your limited Latin understanding may tell you.


Medieval Latin is Latin, the notion comes from the classical Latin to turn into medieval Latin as version.


Sorry, there is no Latin word for 'version' otherwise we would have seen it by now. I have an idea, what do you not post the English definition again. I am sure that everyone would like to see it for the 50th time.


To turn means version


www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.


Thank you for being so accomodating!!! Now, how is that Latin definition coming?



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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Ad-verse DOES NOT EQUAL add-a-verse despite what your limited Latin understanding may tell you.

It's what it';s meaning is to add a verse, then another verse is added and so on.
From ad and verse. Ad as in addition and verse. add verse, add a verse.




Sorry, there is no Latin word for 'version' otherwise we would have seen it by now. I have an idea, what do you not post the English definition again. I am sure that everyone would like to see it for the 50th time.

I don't see how this makes you point, as I already stated that to turn= version, it's what version is.



Thank you for being so accomodating!!! Now, how is that Latin definition coming?

To turn=version. It's where the word comes from, to turn=version.
From clasical latin to turn into medieval latin version, then it spread from there on.




edit on 14-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's what it';s meaning is to add a verse, then another verse is added and so on.
From ad and verse. Ad as in addition and verse. add verse, add a verse.


No it does not. It means 'to turn toward'. There is no other interpretation of the word 'adversary' in Latin as there is no word for 'version' in Latin.



I don't see how this makes you point, as I already stated that to turn= version, it's what version is.


It makes my point because, once again, there is no word for 'version' in Latin.


To turn=version. It's where the word comes from, to turn=version.
From clasical latin to turn into medieval latin version, then it spread from there on.


Oh, so sorry. Your Medieval Latin is just as crappy as your Classical/Ancient Latin. The Medieval Latin word for 'version' is 'lectio' (you would have known these things if you studied Latin).

From the Medieval Latin Lexicon which includes both the French and English translations.

(For everyone except pepsi, this is a very large file so do not open if you do not have to. Pepsi, please open repeatedly.)


lectio: 1. *legon, texte, version, libelle — wording,
lection, text, version. 2. interpretation —
interpretation.


Hence the word 'adlectio' for, wait for it, wait for it, wait for it......'add a verse'!!!!! See how easy that was?

When will you ever learn? Stop pretending to know about a subject when you have zero to minimal knowledge regarding said subject.



edit on 14-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 08:00 AM
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No it does not. It means 'to turn toward'. There is no other interpretation of the word 'adversary' in Latin as there is no word for 'version' in Latin.

It's where version comes from, from Latin to turn to English version.
Adversary comes from adverse, verse=to turn .
For verse:


www.thefreedictionary.com...
Verse
[Middle English vers, from Old English fers and from Old French vers, both from Latin versus, from past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]



Now for version


www.thefreedictionary.com...
Version
[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


It has the same identical meaning, they all came from the same source "vertere" meaning verse=version.
Only that they hold another definition, as in "another version" but it;'s the same thing, they all come from "VERTERE", this is funny it brings us to what a version is.


The word version comes from latin to turn VERTERE, what is not clear ?

Verse=Version, Version=Verse


edit on 15-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's where version comes from, from Latin to turn to English version.
Adversary comes from adverse, verse=to turn .
For verse:


www.thefreedictionary.com...
Verse
[Middle English vers, from Old English fers and from Old French vers, both from Latin versus, from past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


You can not use an ENGLISH or FRENCH dictionary to give a defintion in LATIN. 'Adverary' means 'to turn towards', not 'turn a verse' or 'add a verse' (Adlectio).



Now for version


www.thefreedictionary.com...
Version
[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


It has the same identical meaning, they all came from the same source "vertere" meaning verse=version.
Only that they hold another definition but it;'s the same thing, meaning one has one version and other another version of the same word, vertere.


Who cares what the ENGLISH definition is for the word? You claim that is the Latin definition. Do you know why? BECAUSE YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND LATIN.


The word version comes from latin to turn, what is it not clear ?


The only thing that is crystal clear is that you do not understand Latin. Hence the reason you avoided responding to the true Medieval Latin word for 'version', 'adlectio'.

'Adlectio', 'to add a verse/version', 'adversary', 'to turn towards'. Two different words that even a infant can recognize as such.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


It's clear that you are troubled, the two words are identical because they come from the same word, Vertere, they hold the same meaning to turn. Verse=Version.

Ironicaly this brings us to what a version is, the same source but with different versions, meaning it's the same thing but with different versions of the words, verse and version.
edit on 15-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's clear that you are troubled, the two words are identical because they come from the same word, Vertere, they hold the same meaning to turn. Verse=Version.


No, the truly troubled (you) overlooks the defintion of 'lectio' (version) and avoids offering an explantion on why a person who claims to understand Latin (you again) does not know that this is the Medieval Latin word for 'version' and claims that it is infact another word, 'vertere' which does not mean 'version' in Latin.


Ironicaly...


The only irony is that your vast 'knowledge' of Latin has left you with your pants down again, and again, and again. You should have not pretended to have anything more than a Google-knowledge of the subject. So sad.





edit on 15-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: Networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

Verse=version all from Latin Vertere. It's the origin of the word for verse and version.
I won't be answering your quotes anymore


edit on 15-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Verse=version all from Latin Vertere. It's the origin of the word for verse and version.


Wrong. 'Version' only equals 'lectio' in Medieval Latin. Prior to that there is no word for 'version'. History proves this is the case.


I won't be answering your quotes anymore


Do you promise?



posted on Jul, 16 2011 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 

You're missing the point though.

reply to post by pepsi78
 

First: You're not a Mason
Second: You haven't posted anything of substance or of truth
Three: You judge books by their covers and you don't see the forest for the trees.
edit on 16-7-2011 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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First: You're not a Mason
Second: You haven't posted anything of substance or of truth
Three: You judge books by their covers and you don't see the forest for the trees.
edit on 16-7-2011 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)


You forgot number 4, I'll never be one, I don;'t need to join a satanic organisation. I don't judge books by the cover, and who told you that anyway, I assume it's your dark lord. Only he can make such remarks "don't judge a book by it's cover" when in fact it's don't judge at all.

With Satan being the accuser, from ad +cause same thing as ad-verse, version, it's clear, Satan "the right arm" the power to turn. To accuse with your right arm, the so called justice.

Enjoy your perverded duality, as in per -"version" per-verted, and perversion is the same thing, as in also version and verse. Maybe your friend will look at this. All from per-"verse"

Per-verse
Per-verted
Per-version.

Meaning the same thing.
I'll let you and your deluded friend be, get drunk, or what ever you want to do, not that I want to judge.
I just want to point out in the softest way, tell you what you are.






You Satanist masons have taken over this board, you "add" off be a shame of your selfs.
I "GIVE" squat zero to your remarks. It's what I'll give you. Zero.








edit on 16-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

I'll promise you squat zero, how does that sound ?

edit on 16-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Enjoy your perverded duality, as in per -"version" per-verted, and perversion is the same thing, as in also version and verse. Maybe your friend will look at this. All from per-"verse"

Per-verse
Per-verted
Per-version.


Haha. Captain Latins strikes again.

'Perverto/perverti/perversum' (the root words for the above listed words) mean 'to turn upside down, overturn, overthrow'. Nothing about 'versions', thank you for playing but you lose again.



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