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You're gonna be underwater VERY SOON

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posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 05:51 AM
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You're gonna be underwater VERY SOON. In no time at all you're gonna be underwater. I hope you know that.





posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:01 AM
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When you say "You"....can you be a little more specific? There isn't ice on this planet in sufficient quantity to melt to cover all land or anything even remotely close to it on any imaginable level.

Even a catastrophic 60 METER rise in sea level isn't a global catastrophe and that would take a meteor strike (more than one of them, likely) right into the Antarctic land ice pack. In fact, I think it likely would take several ....considering that sheet of ice is considerably larger than the Continental United States.

Global Flood Simulation

I'd be a little concerned and stay very aware if living in Florida, the Netherlands, Bangladesh or Vietnam for instance. Sea level issues abound in those places. The majority of the planet stays high and dry with beach front simply being redefined. (As it has been many times over the history....many many times before Man came to influence anything)
edit on 23-8-2013 by wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:01 AM
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we here 42`c ...so hot..maybe good to get under water hehehe
edit on 23-8-2013 by cheesy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:09 AM
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reply to post by wrabbit2000
 


I've said it before and I'll say it again... it's not sea levels rising we should be fearing, it's land levels lowering. As mentioned, it would take a lot of extra water to raise the seas to catastrophic levels, but it'd only take a minute fractional lowering of the land for the water already available to come rushing in. Investment in a floating vessel of some kind seems a must.


edit on 23-8-2013 by IvanAstikov because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:13 AM
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dry land and a single tomatoe plant
please not Waterworld again (no offence Kevin )but seriously what were you thinking?



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:23 AM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I am the only man living who understands human nature; God has put me in charge of this branch office; when I retire there will be no-one to take my place. I shall keep on doing my duty, for when I get over on the other side, I shall use my influence to have the human race drowned again, and this time drowned good, no omissions, no Ark.

Mark Twain


Guess old Sam finally made good on his promise.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by IvanAstikov
 


Okay, land levels lowering.... and the belief this is likely to happen in our lifetimes or the next 10,000 years as more likely than the last 10,000 years is based on what? I know it HAS happened...after all, the mountains from my beloved Ozarks to the mighty Himalayas weren't always mountains any more than much that has been found off the coasts was always underwater.

You're talking about planetary changes that, unless science has developed in entirely new ways and radically so? We can't even guess at happening again, let alone predict or bother losing sleep worrying about?

I'm wide open to hearing if solid science does suggest, with any basis to independently look at (Important to add..as people quote 2nd string media on this topic regularly), land is soon to sink as happened in the deep deep geologic past.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


I hope you have plenty of firewood for this winter.

P.S. thanks for the great prediction!

I just enjoyed a great underwater swim.

The SEALS were impeccable.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 06:41 AM
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The problem isn't rising sea levels destroying all the land, the problem is the large amount of arable land that is at sea level.

Them mountains? Ain't so good for growing crops on.

In Egypt, or Bangladesh, even a 1m rise in sea levels displaces millions of people and wipes out a very large percentage of those countries arable land.

Not to mention the major coastal cities, all of which would be severely threatened by even quite minor sea level changes. Let's just say, I think over the next 30 years, the value of properties in New York, Los Angeles, London, Amsterdam, etc, are gonna tumble.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by Painterz
 


I have to ask this... Are people even taking a moment to look at the simulators that show what ACTUALLY happens with different Sea Levels or is it just that "Experts" have said so, and so it must be so?

30 meters ...NINETY FEET...of Sea level rise still doesn't reach Los Angeles. Not all that close, really. Twice that, at a staggering 60 meters...would start impacting the immediate communities around downtown L.A....but Union Station would still be on dry ground by the look of it...

....and even 30 feet would be unthinkable by Al Gores worst nightmare of any physically possible scenario modern times could produce....unless Earth falls back into a phase of planetary change as a whole and then? We don't need to worry... We won't survive the opening stages of it. No one will.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 07:43 AM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


But I'm posting from a submarine miles below the Atlantic. Explain that one.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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Takes a precautionary deep breath.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 10:16 AM
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I live way above sea level. I don't think I will be under water. Not unless you are talking of frozen water, we could get up to three hundred inches of snow this winter. That has happened around here before. If none of it melts, that could be a little problem.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by spartacus699
 


GOOD.


2nd.



posted on Aug, 23 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by spartacus699
You're gonna be underwater VERY SOON. In no time at all you're gonna be underwater.


Could you define "VERY SOON"? and be a little more specific about "In no time at all...."?

Just more DOOMPORN!!

Is there a chance that water levels across the world will rise due to melting Ice Glaciers? Sure. Will populated areas have time to react? Probably. But as we have already seen across the world, significant rainfall is causing devasting, instant flooding causing people to be caught off guard and loss of life. So I guess it stands, if you live close to the edge of land and ocean or near high rising rivers, you stand the chance of being flooded and/or worse. That is a fair thing to say. Otherwise, keep informed, no where you are in relation to such things and look both ways before crossing the street.

edit on 23-8-2013 by ItDepends because: sentence structure



posted on Aug, 24 2013 @ 03:16 AM
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From my perspective, more water equals more room to roam the seas.....no biggy, from a boat.



posted on Aug, 24 2013 @ 03:29 AM
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Oh goody, just what I always wanted...

Radioactive waste getting washed up on my front lawn.


Time to prep the John Deere heavy duty cleaner upper thingamajig attachment.



posted on Aug, 24 2013 @ 03:39 AM
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reply to post by wrabbit2000
 


Nice link, im looking for a 40 meter rise, that way both my home and workplace is oceanfront!



posted on Aug, 24 2013 @ 04:37 AM
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reply to post by wrabbit2000
 


I don't have any factual evidence of catastrophic land lowering events, but seeing as 95% of the sea floor hasn't been mapped and studied yet, that's hardly surprising.



posted on Aug, 24 2013 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by IvanAstikov
 


It's interesting to see here but from what the instructors were telling me yesterday on this at school, the physical record shows sea levels were measurably lower in ancient times. Not higher. That was a surprise as I've sure heard plenty say it was just the opposite. As support they noted the evidence of structures and settlement under water in not just one area, but all over the world. Including the Med, Off the US S.E. Coast and the Persian Gulf as we know it today. Land lowering is one theory I've heard in isolation to one or another of those spots....but I hadn't considered them, taken together. When looked at at once, the sinking idea loses it's viability as a theory, I think.

What are the odds places just off the coast of modern coastlines world wide all dropped about the same degrees at around the same times? Not so much..I'm thinking. So....Interesting... I wonder what the world would have physically looked like to see with water levels that much lower than current?

edit on 24-8-2013 by wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)




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