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German goverment warns of Windows 8

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posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by Mudwlke
 


Phil Zimmerman. He never put the backdoor in. Was under criminal investigation for three years for allegedly violating export restrictions on cryptographic methods. Back then, as they do today, the government doesnt quite understand the nature of the Internet. Look what they did to Defense Distributed.

Now Symantec owns PGP. The source code is readily available for anyone wishing to investigate it for backdoors.

If you still dont trust it (I dont since it's corporate owned) there is GnuPG, an open-source community maintained alternative.

There is plenty of rumor and hearsay about a PGP backdoor but there is no proof.




posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by RageAgainstFascism

I have included a link to an English translation of the original article.

It seems to me that large software companies, such as Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Amazon and others like them, are shooting themselves in the feet by creating backdoors or providing access to sensitive and private information.

Eventually people will no longer trust American providers. It's already happening. Contracts are being canceled. People are also becoming tech savvy and secure solutions to store your data and e-mails at home can be found almost anywhere, not to mention that these systems are cheap.

It seems that Snowden's revelations will have a deeper impact than anticipated. Sooner or later the government has to learn that it has to follow the same rules it expects its citizens to follow and that the Constitution is not just some piece of paper.

www.zeit.de
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 21-8-2013 by RageAgainstFascism because: style


Are you sure about that? We've been guided into this. Sure we "found out" about how they are using newer technology but look at the recent generations. Wasn't it know that they were being spied on too? Were their numbers smaller than our? Did they believe less in change or even more in the government than we do? I really don't know. I hope this starts churning into some real change because we've been dominated as a species for quite a long time now. Are you free?



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by Angelic Resurrection
 


I agree. From the little that I know regarding computers and IT, I am aware of Microsoft's previous use of backdoors and the like. You can't really believe that a man who supports a eugenics agenda would stop using backdoors and other spying programs. Could you? As far as using Microsoft and the likes, boycotting seems like a good alternative. However, there are so many out there who do not know much about these malicious software and buy into, "Update to the newest version now!" I think they need to be educated as well.

As far as Americans, I agree that not all of us are the same. There's quite a few that have been awakened (myself, included). However, we, too, have to put ourselves in others shoes and understand that their "hate toward the American people" comes with very valid reasons. America hasn't been as good as the media loves to portray. In my opinion, if one person dislikes you and everyone else does than the problem is with that person that dislikes you. However, if you find that a lot of people dislike you, then maybe, you are the problem.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Well, her first mistake was buying a dell.
You should have returned it and bought her a prebuilt comp from a company like ibuypower. You pick the one with the hardware you like, they install the OS you want and that's it. No bloatware, nothing useless. Or you could have built her one, sounds like you have the skills for it. Either way, I don't trust comps built by companies like Dell, they've always got bloatware and really moronic hardware configurations.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


So there are no enemies?
Everyone outside America loves us and would never do anything to harm you, me or the people of this country?
China is our best friend? You trust them that much?
America should be the only major power on the planet that doesn't gather intelligence because you are concerned that the NSA is going to read your email to grandma or dig through the countless spam and advertising messages your receive?



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by stormcell


There's Linux - that's open source. But rumor has it that the hardware itself (the motherboard) actually has the spyware installed, that allows remote hardware administration.


You shouldn't be scared so easily. The picture belows explains the OSI model, i.e. how data generated by an application, such as your Internet browser, is in fact packaged before it is transmitted.

You can use a traffic analyzer, such as wireshark or tcpdump to monitor everything that comes to and leaves your network.

A well-configured firewall combined with an IPS system, such as snort, will block a lot of undesired traffic and script kiddies. It is also crucial (and often forgotten) that a firewall system can be configured to restrict outgoing traffic, which is equally important.

But still, a well-configured firewall and IPS don't offer protection if the application that is being used to process and transmit data is insecure, e.g. the zero-day exploit in the Tor suite. Caution is always advised.




posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by Antipathy17
... Are you free?



In today's society nobody is really free, not even the president of the US. It's all about control, one way or another.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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This likely comes as a surprise to no one here, as we're already of the mindset that there is plenty going on daily to invade our privacy and spy on every aspect of our lives by governments here and abroad. The operating system, the hardware running it, and the network that hardware is on is all part of the equation, yet the single largest factor is the person using it, and has been since its inception.

One must also examine the painful fact that most do not really care about their security, privacy, or anonymity. This is far larger than Windows 8, and has tendrils edging further and further into our daily lives while most remain blissfully ignorant to the complete picture of each individual the governments and corporations are compiling. This is a lot more than an operating system. It's a complete way of life, and in order to break free of it, very serious and long term inconveniences exist.

For instance, the NSA also has access to corporate information through their data harvesting program PRISM. Those corporations already know a great deal about you, your habits and routines, and can likely give DHS all the information they need to know exactly where you are at any point in time, and what you're doing. Let's examine a few of these intrusions here:

1. Banking Information - Most people live in a plastic world. They use debit and credit cards for well over half of their daily financial transactions. The banks provide you and easy way to pay for your food, your entertainment, and the goods you consume. Your bank records tell the NSA where you shop, how much you spend on average each time you go to the store, how often you go to the store, what times of day you can be expected to shop, and what things you like based upon the stores you frequent.


2. Rewards Cards - Most retailers provide these for additional discounts. You are issued a number or card that you scan during each transaction and sometimes you get fuel points for shopping there, discounts on purchases, or even a dividend. By matching up the number the store gives you with your credit card information, they can now discern where you shop, but what it is you shop for. They know if you like Italian food more than Chinese. They know if you prefer Nikon over Canon. They know if you like to go camping, or if you prefer to stay in city limits. They know if you are a hunter, a gun owner, or whether you prefer commuting to work or driving. Rewards cards give you little bits back, but they compile an immense amount of data over time providing trends for each individual shopper.

3. Internet Connections - Most of us use email. It's how we communicate with family and friends when we're not texting them through a phone the NSA is eavesdropping on. Then there's also Facebook and other social media sites that we've been sucked into by family and friends as a primary means of finding out what's going on in everyone's lives. While this can be a good thing, there's also a huge amount of data being thrown around. The NSA knows who you communicate with on a regular basis, what you talk about, and knows where you were while posting due to people "checking in". This presents a difficult problem for those who wish to remain free of surveillance because these people likely do not take precautions when discussing you and can provide many details to prying eyes who want to know more about you. There's even this website. Your MAC address can be tied to your login information and the NSA has no problems whatsoever in seeing what boards you post on, and which you avoid. This is defining your interests. Same thing goes with LinkedIn and Reddit.

So what is one to do? As was the case in Orwell's 1984, it isn't easy:

1. First off, you have to get away from plastic. While the governments can follow your movements via traffic cams, etc, using cash as opposed to plastic cuts out a chunk of what they can learn about you.

2. Stop using rewards cards when you make purchases even though it'll cost you more.

3. Don't post on social media sites at all, and ask your friends and family to not post about you (good luck with that one). While most can't realistically do this and not become a hermit, one must be consciously aware of what is put on these sites and censor yourself accordingly. If you want to share pictures with family and friends, send them via a thumb drive. You can even encrypt them if you choose with a password you chose beforehand.

4. Don't use a cellphone when you know full well that it can be tracked via cell towers and the internal GPS.

5. Write letters. It's old school, but works. They scan every letter as it goes through the post office, so you do something simple like put the letter inside a book, comic book, etc.

Continued on next post...



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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...continued

6. Computer security can be tough, inconvenient, and is never 100%. There are things you can do to make things more secure than they normally are. To begin with, turn off the internet when not being used. You can unplug the router, or a less secure way is to turn off your computer's wifi. This severs a link to the outside world while you work. Most of the time you don't need to be connected to the internet anyway. This allows you to work on projects and encrypt them before connecting to the internet. Do not save any sensitive data on the primary disk in your computer. You should always save sensitive data on an external drive that can be physically disconnected from the computer when accessing the internet. Turn off all cloud storage options. Do not have your computer remember your passwords. Do not provide websites with your information, or anything but a burner email address. Consider using "DoNotTrackMe", and "DNSCrypt" or similar software to increase anonymity.

This is by no means a comprehensive list. This isn't anything that people don't already know in the back of their minds. With PRISM harvesting all data, it doesn't matter what os you're using. If it goes over a fiber line, it's being seen. Be conscious of that. It shouldn't be a surprise to anyone that Putin ordered everyone in his office to return to using typewriters. It's wise to pay attention to what the former head of the KGB is doing for his security.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by bpg131313
 


I can only agree with your statements. Convenience is a trap that is easily exploited.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by winofiend

you mean metro, don't you...

you don't actually have to use the computer in metro. not unless you want to.



Incorrect.

There are certain tasks that can ONLY be accomplished with the metro interface, even with a third party program like "Start8" installed. I can't recall what those tasks are, since I avoid Win8 like it was plague-ridden (which it IS), but I can look through the e-book that Dell sent me if I need to elaborate more on it.

Furthermore, even on the pseudo desktop, some operations can only be accessed through that silly-assed strip of pictures that pops out from the right hand side of the screen if you can manage to hit the "hot spot" to make it pop.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by zeeon
This whole thing is complete hogwash. I'm in a position to say that because I am a Cybersecurity, Information Assurance, Certification and Accreditation Expert for the Federal Government.


I see.



I love a good conspiracy, I really do. This is not one. TPM has existed for a very long time, it's not new.


Yes, it has. I mentioned that in my first post in this thread. I'd thought it had died out and gone the way of the dinosaurs, but it's Baaaack!



And as for Microsoft limiting what applications users install - that has got to be the craziest thing I have ever heard of.


That was the basis for TPM. Limiting what applications could be installed and ran. The specific applications they tried to scare the chilgren with were trojans and pirated software, but an application is an application. If you can block one, you can block any.



First of all, the Government would never allow any of it's systems to be managed, controlled or otherwise accesible by a third party such as Microsoft. I know this to be true because I Certify and Accredit all types of Information Systems (computers) for use on Government Networks. The Government Pays me to make sure we have complete control of all information systems we deploy (and that their software, operating systems and applications are secured).

Secondly, I have Windows 8 at home - yes it does want your Live ID but you do not HAVE to provide one.

Third - A nice IDS (Intrusion Detection System) and/or Firewall properly configured will stop any third party from remotely accessing your system. This has nothing to do with Snowden's leak about the NSA phone / internet spying programs.


Considering you vocational choice, you know as well as I do that unless you block port 80, anyone and their uncle can get in. The catch-22 is that blocking port 80 also blocks the web browsers. The ONLY truly secure from intrusion system is one not connected to any network.

You're right about it not having anything to do with Snowden's leaks, though. His leaks involved strong-arming internet companies to provide info, and dragnetting internet traffic to see what sort of fish were caught. Had nothing to do with any backdoors in OS's.



Fourth - even IF this were true (which it's not) why would Microsoft attempt such a thing? Would they really want to alienate their MASSIVE share of software developers by limiting what can and can't be installed on a Windows Operating System? That would be complete business suicide. The only thing that makes Windows "better" than say, Ubuntu or Debian, or Slackware is the plethora of software available for Windows that is not available for Linux systems. Talk about a boon for Linux!


The answer to that lies in the TPM specifications.



Lets try denying some ignorance around here...sheesh.


Yes, lets!



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by optimus primal
 


The only prior experience I'd had with Dells were a couple of them at work in a security environment which operated the biometric access points to a facility, and one I had to fix. The ones at work were wiped of the bloatware and had proprietary software (not from Dell) installed, and were maintained by outside techs, so I never had to fool around with them.

The one I fixed was one I found on a curb set out with the trash. I initially grabbed it just for spare parts, but got intrigued by WHY it was out there, without any obvious physical damage. on boot there was nothing - no POST data or anything at all but a blinking cursor. Took me 3 days and Linux to fix it, but after I did I had no problems with it, other than scraping up the right drivers - that's what took most of the 3 days.

I DO build computers to order, optimized for specific applications, but hell, all ma does with one is surf the internet and save pictures off her camera, so I figured even a Dell could do that! I was wrong
Besides, I have to find a new wholesaler for new parts, since I've abandoned my old stomping grounds. Not much available up in them thar hills along those lines. I'd have had to engaged in e-commerce, which I detest. I don't really know if the computer is OK or not, because it has that damnable Win8 on it, and won't let you fix that major malfunction without gutting it and probably voiding the warranty. Come to think of it, though, the warranty didn't do much good, either - wasn't worth the paper it was written on. The revival of TPM such that you can't fix a broken operating system is troubling, especially in light of the uses TPM was slated to be put to before the uproar, and in light of M$ attempts to corner the market and OWN the machine, disallowing other operating systems (even older Windows) to be installed. That's actually what I thought the uproar was about, rather than any "backdoor" in Win8.

Since I still can't read German, I still can't be sure that ISN'T what it is about.

This new report of a potential back door in Win8 sort of surprises me, though. It was bad enough already without that, and who really needs a backdoor in the OS anyhow? Government has previously insisted on backdoors in encryption software, or else keys in escrow, but that wouldn't apply to the entire operating system, one would think, just whatever passes for encryption in Windows these days. Getting data that is in plaintext off of remote computers is already pretty easy ( I mean SCARY easy for the average home PC), and I don't see any need for a backdoor to be built into the operating system, really. Just getting Windows to cache a copy of it's encryption keys or the passwords somewhere for any encrypted file system it produces ought to answer better than an actual backdoor in the OS.


edit on 2013/8/22 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 07:12 PM
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Originally posted by Thorneblood

China is our best friend? You trust them that much?



At this point I trust them more than I trust the US Federal government. They're in CHINA fer chrissakes! What are they gonna do to me? Park out front in a black SUV and send in the stormtroopers?



America should be the only major power on the planet that doesn't gather intelligence because you are concerned that the NSA is going to read your email to grandma or dig through the countless spam and advertising messages your receive?



They should be the only one that doesn't SPY ON THEIR OWN PEOPLE! It's that whole constitutionally guaranteed "shining light on a hill example" thing. What I have to say to granny ain't none of their damned business. I'd break the neighbor's nose for getting too nosey, why should I give the federales a pass on invading my constitutionally-guaranteed privacy?



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by nenothtu
reply to post by optimus primal
 


Since I still can't read German, I still can't be sure that ISN'T what it is about.



That's the caveat isn't it? We now know that there is directional input from NSA/NCTC and the ridiculous FISA court to make providers and system makers comply, we just don't know to what extent in the case of providers like Youtube, (owned now by Google, and formerly by a bunch of guys out of paypal
) are being forced to comply. I have a Youtube account and since Snowden, besieged by Youtube to change my online name because it is strange, (it is not that strange) even though it was there for around five years, and at a time when it took yonks to register at Youtube with an unused user name?? The account has near 15,000 hits on a single item, without monetary gain, so why would Youtube want me to change my online name?



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 08:23 PM
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lol @ the 'down with america' bs

yeah, because things will change when the alternative is in power. at least the people spying on you at the moment say they're on your side!



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by christoph
 


Originally posted by christoph
lol @ the 'down with america' bs

I think most of the criticism is not about "down with america" at all.
Its just that we'd rather see a comeback of the United States we used to know.

The U.S. that stood for freedom, and for liberty, and for what is just.
The U.S. that fought against fascism.... not the other way around.

That's pretty much what all the true U.S. patriots want for their country too, if we can believe their various post on the topic here on ATS.
edit on 22-8-2013 by ColCurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by smurfy
We now know that there is directional input from NSA/NCTC and the ridiculous FISA court to make providers and system makers comply, we just don't know to what extent in the case of providers like Youtube, (owned now by Google, and formerly by a bunch of guys out of paypal
) are being forced to comply. I have a Youtube account and since Snowden, besieged by Youtube to change my online name because it is strange, (it is not that strange) even though it was there for around five years, and at a time when it took yonks to register at Youtube with an unused user name?? The account has near 15,000 hits on a single item, without monetary gain, so why would Youtube want me to change my online name?


I dunno. Youtube accounts mystify me. I don't know why anyone would want one to begin with. I never set one up, yet suddenly just had one. Now it's pestering me to get rid of my account, which I never set up to begin with. I thought the NSA just donated one to me. Why would they want me to get rid of it now, especially in light of the fact that I never wanted, needed, or signed up for it to begin with? It's against my policy to delete things I never created, and I do wish they'd stop bugging me about it. Whomever created the account can delete it.

Maybe having to constantly watch videos of hippopotamii juggling bowling balls in an effort to catch me being not good is taking a toll on the boys at Ft. Meade, and they aren't getting their important National Security work done for the sheer work load of having to watch them, and the bosses want the account gone because of that. Eff 'em. track down the knothead that set it up to begin with, and get HIM to delete the damned thing!



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by christoph
lol @ the 'down with america' bs

yeah, because things will change when the alternative is in power. at least the people spying on you at the moment say they're on your side!



Yeah.

That don't make the spying OK, just because they make a false claim. Matter of fact, fishing for BS to support false claims and false allegations is really sort of the whole problem with the setup, isn't it?

America can't go down. It ceased to exist as the nation it was 20 years ago. Can't kill the already dead.

Therefore "down with America" is a sort of oxymoron. It's already down.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by RageAgainstFascism
 


I love security risks. Gives me justification in the final analysis.



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