The mind-blowing game-changer you can't unsee.

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posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 08:25 PM
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Since there are some here who can't visualize what my rotated .gif represents, I present these images which are some of the ones used to make my .gif in chronological order.

some of the rotated images









edit on 19-8-2013 by HiramA because: wrong order




posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by HiramA
 


the fact that the top debunkers have come out draws more interest from me,

i think you rotating view and the 2007 image,
is very hard to dismiss,

i find the nature an location of these objects to be..............unnatural

keep up the good work


xploder



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by HiramA
The rotation is an illusion.
Is there an echo in here? I said that earlier, because it's the camera that's rotating, not the sun. A point which Soylent demonstrated with an example of the illusion of a rotating keyboard that wasn't really rotating.


Originally posted by HiramA
What you should be looking at are the dark areas of the corona which VERY CLEARLY DO NOT MOVE thanks to my stabilizing them.
No, those dark areas are not part of the corona, they are artifacts of the photographic apparatus which you have used for stabilization.

The dark area from about 2:30-3:30 and specifically the bright area above it (12:00-2:20) rotate CCW in your animation. That's the corona. Yes it varies, but the rotation is clear.


Originally posted by HiramA
Since there are some here who can't visualize what my rotated .gif represents
Pot, meet Kettle.

With the corona stabilized, the "objects" you said aren't moving are moving with the camera.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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Here's another example of a different object.
Look to the bottom right of the sun. This one appears dark.
The images used for this one are dated Aug 11-15, 2013.

darksmall



There's even another object right at the bottom middle. Not as easy to see.
edit on 19-8-2013 by HiramA because: forgot something



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Look, I appreciate your skepticism and your input - both are important, but I just don't have time to argue with you.
So I present these images as they are, and as I found them. I am no physicist, and I assume you're not either. There could be errors in my assessment, I accept that; but this diversion is costing me time which I could use to post more images. They will come. Some may be more convincing than others and I will let ATS decide for itself. But I will not accept that ALL of the anomalies I have found, some of which you have not seen, are lens flare.
I agree that they are artifacts; I'm curious to know who built them. Perhaps you could look at the the three other objects which are visible in '25 days'. Nobody has said anything about those. I don't mind debunkers, but look at all the facts before you go pronouncing the truth as you see it.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:28 PM
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Hey everyone, look at me!! I have access to the internets, so that makes me an armchair astronomer/astrophysicist!




I seriously wish graphics editing software was only available to high-education scholars and industry-specific professionals.... Lol, giving fools access to image editing, does nothing but advocate their keyboard-jockey habits.

Speculation, that's all this is. You will never know the depths to the knowledge you seek.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by weavty1
 


"I seriously wish graphics editing software was only available to high-education scholars and industry-specific professionals.... Lol, giving fools access to image editing, does nothing but advocate their keyboard-jockey habits."

Nice avatar. Make that yourself?



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Arb, the occlusion disc is rotating, BUT, the disc is not exactly centered on the sun. This gives the illusion of counter clockwise rotation of the sun's corona. I'll agree with you - the sun LOOKS like it is rotating but it is an illusion as the satellite's equipment rotates.

Looks like NASA tried several experiments with the solar observer to see for themselves if the anomaly was indeed something real or an artifact in the equipment.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by HiramA
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


1- The 'object' is the pen next to your keyboard, not the plastic.
2- The sun is NOT spinning in my image. I stabilized it in order to show that even though the camera is spinning, the object and the sun are NOT. If you stabilized the keyboard, the pen would not move, but the plastic 'speck' on your lens would.

This is not complicated, people.

But thank you for proving my point for me.


Of course the sun "appears" to be spinning in your example, just like the keyboard appeared to be spinning in mine, both examples due to the camera itself spinning.

I mean, how in the world can you say that the does not appear to spin in the image you posted (below). In your example, I can see the corona spinning along with the spinning image frame (just like my keyboard spun along with the image frame. The spinning of the corona can clearly be seen.

Sure -- there are other blobs that appear to be in the frame, and a blobby shadowy halo surrounding the black occlusion disk blocking the sun, but that blobby halo around the occlusion disk is NOT the Sun. The entire sun (minus the corona, which IS spinning) is blocked by the disk.


Originally posted by HiramA
2- These objects have been visible since 2007, but nothing has been said publicly by NASA officials. Many available images have been deleted from the public data base, had parts hidden with black rectangles, or renamed such that they could not be found.
It can be shown that NASA did some gymnastics with their equipment in order to verify that these objects were not an anomaly caused by lens defects, interference patterns, etc. In the space of 27 hrs, the image was seen to rotate 360 degrees in regular intervals. I called NASA's representative for the Stereo project (Joseph B. Gurman) to get an explanation but my call was not returned.

rotate





edit on 8/19/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Look, it's really quite simple. Go to Helioviewer.org, look at any date, move forward by an hour, repeat until you see that the dark spots do not move unless the satellite is rotating.
I'm getting tired of all these diversionary tactics.
The level of your mis-understanding can only be described as purposeful.

"By the way, the blobby halo around the occulation disk is NOT the Sun. The entire sun (minus the corona, which IS spinning) is blocked by the disk."
I never said it was. I said it was part of the corona. You seem to read as well as you understand.
edit on 19-8-2013 by HiramA because: more info



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:00 PM
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Originally posted by NightFlight
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Arb, the occlusion disc is rotating, BUT, the disc is not exactly centered on the sun. This gives the illusion of counter clockwise rotation of the sun's corona. I'll agree with you - the sun LOOKS like it is rotating but it is an illusion as the satellite's equipment rotates.

Looks like NASA tried several experiments with the solar observer to see for themselves if the anomaly was indeed something real or an artifact in the equipment.


No. As I mentioned in my post above, if you think that blobby shadowy ring surrounding the occlusion disk is the Sun, then you are mistaken. The entire sun (minus the corona) is blocked by the disk. You CAN see the corona, which is in fact spinning exactly in step with the image frame.

The Sun is much brighter than that blobby ring surrounding the occlusion disk -- hence the need for the disk.



edit on 8/19/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:05 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by NightFlight
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Arb, the occlusion disc is rotating, BUT, the disc is not exactly centered on the sun. This gives the illusion of counter clockwise rotation of the sun's corona. I'll agree with you - the sun LOOKS like it is rotating but it is an illusion as the satellite's equipment rotates.

Looks like NASA tried several experiments with the solar observer to see for themselves if the anomaly was indeed something real or an artifact in the equipment.


No. As I mentioned in my post above, if you think that blobby shadowy ring surrounding the occlusion disk is the Sun, then you are mistaken. The entire sun (minus the corona) is blocked by the disk. You CAN see the corona, which is in fact spinning exactly in step with the image frame.

The Sun is much brighter than that blobby ring surrounding the occlusion disk -- hence the need for the disk.



edit on 8/19/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)


OHHKAAYY, Thats what I said. The occlusion disc in the equipment, is the sun's cover, completely covering the sun only allowing the corona to be observed. When the satellite and equipment were rotated the occlusion disc rotated as well. SINCE the disc is not centered on the sun, nor is it perfectly circular, as the equipment rotates the corona is revealed around the circumference of the occlusion disc GIVING the illusion of the sun's counter-clockwise rotation. Comprende amiga?



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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Hey, OP... maybe you will like this video. I don't know if it has already been posted but I haven't seen it on ATS yet. I don't know what it is... maybe the guy is screwing with people, maybe it is just something embedded in his art but it is interesting and makes me want to try it out... I just don't have a good enough camera. The reason it caught my eye is because last year there was an object near the sun. It was in NASA photos. It was a black crescent and people dismissed it because the part that looked smoldering was on the outside... but that could be explained by element behavior, like blowing on a smoldering piece of wood. The part you are blowing on may only glow brighter slightly but as the air moves through the crevices and wood it could carry sparks out the other side that WOULDN'T be blocked out by the filters. I don't know and don't pretend to know what it could be but despite the video title, I do not think it is ISON. I do not think it is a comet. However, what is in this video is the same size and is roughly the same size as what you are curious about in your thread.

Maybe you will find it interesting and maybe it will give some resident photographers some ideas.

edit on 19-8-2013 by NotAnAspie because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


Superb!
I've got images from my topic which look like they're at those locations. It would be useful to say here that some digital cameras are sensitive to UV.
I'm going to try to compare the locations of my images with those on the video and will get back to you.
Thanks very much. It's about time there was some intelligent discussion and info sharing here.
Good eye!!



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by HiramA
reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


Superb!
I've got images from my topic which look like they're at those locations. It would be useful to say here that some digital cameras are sensitive to UV.
I'm going to try to compare the locations of my images with those on the video and will get back to you.
Thanks very much. It's about time there was some intelligent discussion and info sharing here.
Good eye!!


If that guy really caught something on his camera, I wish he would make a timeline that progresses and tells us what the time and date are for each photo. I also noticed that the location of the tree was slightly different but not very different, so I wonder if he took the pictures roughly around the same time of day, varying a little here and there... but on different days. I would like for someone to try this to see if they can see anything... even though I realize the guy may be pulling our leg. I just know that last year NASA photos DID show something rather strange... and I'm wondering if the part that was visible on whatever that was has burnt or smelted out and left some extremely hard to see anomaly. I don't know.

All I know is the images in this video look pretty cool and make you really wonder if something is there. I haven't quite seen an approach like this yet. I would definitely like some opinions and/or explanations from ATS.

Glad you enjoyed it.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


The objects don't seem to move, satellite position and triangulation are the keywords here but knowing when and where they are from different angles could prove very helpful.
Thanks again.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:52 PM
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The images from STEREO's COR1 and COR2 White Light cameras suffer from lens artifacts.

The ones that we are seeing your images are explained here:


There are also some permanent artifacts in the instrumental backgrounds of the COR1 telescopes. Since these artifacts are always there, in a perfect world they would be removed in the background subtraction process. However, they are sensitive to small moment-by-moment changes in the spacecraft pointing, and thus cannot be completely removed. The artifacts are demonstrated in the images below. (Only a few representative artifacts have been circled.) They are caused by small defects in the field lens of each COR1 telescope, though some have also appeared since launch due to the migration of individual dust particles onto the surface of the field lens. Although they can appear anywhere within the image, they are most visible near the edge of the occulter. These artifacts appear as bright rings with a dark center, reflecting the shape of the input aperture with the occulter in the center. Generally, only one side or edge of the ring is visible, giving the artifact a "fingernail" appearance.




and



source for text and above images

The white circle in the above images is were the physical location of the sun and it's actual diameter is in each image.
As you can see, it does not extend past the Coronagraph (black circle blocking the sun light).

Satellite based Coronagraphs can suffer from issues along with the camera equipment and lenses:


While space-based coronagraphs such as LASCO avoid the sky brightness problem, they face design challenges in stray light management under the stringent size and weight requirements of space flight. Any sharp edge (such as the edge of an occulting disk or optical aperture) causes Fresnel diffraction of incoming light around the edge, which means that the smaller instruments that one would want on a satellite unavoidably leak more light than larger ones would. The LASCO C-3 coronagraph uses both an external occulter (which casts shadow on the instrument) and an internal occulter (which blocks stray light that is Fresnel-diffracted around the external occulter) to reduce this "leakage", and a complicated system of baffles to eliminate stray light scattering off the internal surfaces of the instrument itself.


In your gifs where you have the image rotating, you can see that the strands of the sun's actual corona are rotating too, indication motion in the STEREO satellite, where as the lens artifacts (the "cloudy" area around the coronagraph and your "object" do not seem to rotate, indicating that they are actually in the camera system and not external to it).

Another thing we can do is:

Look at other images of the sun at the same times or near same times that your "objects" are being shown:

Here is your image with your "objects" in it. The image was taken by STEREO B COR1 White Light on 17 June 2013 at 16:45



Here is a image from STEREO A COR1 White Light same date as above, but only 5 minutes later:



We see the "cloudy" lens artifacts......but your "object" is not there.

Let's look at other solar observatories taking pictures at that time too:

Here is a image from SOHO using the LASCO C2 White Light detector, only 9 minutes before your image:



No objects in sight.......

Again from SOHO, LASCO C3 White Light taken only 3 minutes before your image:



Stars....planet......corona whisps.....but I again am not seeing your "objects"........

That's because they don't actually exist, and are camera and lens artifacts.

While I understand that it can be easy to get excited over things that do not look right to you, in the future, you might want to research more about the equipment that actually takes these images, their flaws, defects and artifacts that can appear in the images.
Also, as I showed, never depend on just one camera. If something is really there, it helps to have independent confirmation from a different camera.....that way you can actually prove that something is there, as it's showing up in other images and can not be written off as a camera or lens artifact.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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That orb at the 7 o'clock position is the very object that fueled itself from the sun awhile back and then disconnected itself.

Its definitely an unknown.



posted on Aug, 19 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by HiramA
 

Nope, Google





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