Texas issues Measles Alert! Important Notice!

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posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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If you live in Texas, this ought to be of special interest. Measles is no joke and can range from a very annoying period of discomfort and icky to endure to fatal complications.


The Texas Department of State Health Services said Texas had 11 confirmed cases so far this year, based on figures as of Friday. Six in the last week were in Tarrant County, the department said, but county Public Health officials in Fort Worth later updated that number to report a total of nine cases.

Dallas and Denton counties each reported two measles cases, Harris County has one.


The reason this matters is clear by the second part of the next quote.


Tarrant County Public Health experts traced some of the area's measles cases to an adult who had traveled outside the U.S., the agency said. Further details about the person and where he or she traveled were not immediately released.

"Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90 percent of the people close to that person who are not immune or vaccinated will also become infected with the measles virus," according to state health officials.
(Emphasis Added)
Source

A bit more from the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.

Summary:


Measles is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus. The disease of measles and the virus that causes it share the same name. The disease is also called rubeola.
Measles causes fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. About one out of 10 children with measles also gets an ear infection, and up to one out of 20 gets pneumonia. For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die.


Modern Mortality Info:


While measles is almost gone from the United States, it still kills nearly 200,000 people each year around the world. Measles can also make a pregnant woman have a miscarriage or give birth prematurely. For more information, visit the Complications page.
Source

...and that complications page

So, it's up to each person who may be in an area like Texas is notifying people of now. To vaccinate? Stay away from people who may be infected or nothing at all? It's a personal matter each has to live with the result.

Whatever the choice each one makes though? Knowing the situation exists is the most critical part, IMO.
edit on 18-8-2013 by wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by wrabbit2000
 


Nice catch!


short snippet from CDC:

2013 Outbreaks in New York and North Carolina

This year, measles outbreaks have occurred in several states. One outbreak, in New York, is the largest outbreak in 15 years in the United States. An outbreak in North Carolina has also resulted in numerous cases.
www.cdc.gov...

...and now Texas.

I wonder where he had traveled from?

Right now in Syria:

Syria: Measles epidemic signals growing humanitarian needs

A measles epidemic is sweeping through districts of northern Syria, with up to 7,000 known cases, an indication that humanitarian needs are increasing and the country’s healthcare system is in a state of collapse after more than two years of civil war. Teams from the international medical organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have vaccinated more than 75,000 children in the provinces of Aleppo, Ar-Raqqah and Idlib in an effort to stem the epidemic among a population previously unused to outbreaks of this kind.
www.msf.org...
_____

I'm just hoping that they don't announce 'a cure for cancer' using the measles virus.
(I am Legend-movie-reference)




posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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My nephew has these bumps and red marks on him...maybe this is what he has??



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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FYI

This has been an issue in the UK for the past year...

www.bbc.co.uk...

Check this link to the BBC and you will see 400 + cases in Wales and 175 + caeses in the NE of the UK......

Regards

PDUK



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by Casualboy100
My nephew has these bumps and red marks on him...maybe this is what he has??


Make sure he gets checked out by a doctor. I've had measles and it's not fun. If it does turn out to be measles, make sure his home is left dim. No bright light or if not possible to control all the light, your nephew's eyes should be covered. Measles and bright light can cause blindness so it's serious stuff. Make sure he's also getting a lot of Vitamin A (carrots are a good source). Hopefully it's just chicken pox or a run in with poison ivy.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 12:33 PM
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Thanks for this!


It's important to remember that the MMR vaccine is far more dangerous than Measles itself, so don't let anyone manipulate you into getting it.

Measles is perfectly safe in healthy well-nourished individuals, more specifically it's about having enough Vitamin A in your system.

If you are one of the people who does vaccinate based on your belief-system, make sure that you do not take Paracetamol around the time of the vaccine as this prevents your body from detoxifying, meaning there's an increased risk of Regressive Autism. Ideally don't take any pharmaceutical drugs with the vaccine, but if you do go for Ibuprofen rather than Paracetamol.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:27 PM
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Hidden in plain sight.Liposomal vitamin C, should do the trick.



Klenner administered ascorbate by injection, and, as Lendon H. Smith describes in great detail in the Clinical Guide to the Use of Vitamin C: The Clinical Experiences of Frederick R. Klenner, M.D., Klenner found that “the most effective route was intravenous, but the intramuscular route was satisfactory. He gave at least 350 mg per kilogram of body weight.” That quantity per day is a dose of 25,000-30,000 mg or so for an adult. Yet, Smith adds, “With 350 mg per kilogram of body weight every two hours, he could stop measles and dry up chicken pox.”



This is indeed a large amount of vitamin C. Such use exemplifies the modern orthomolecular physician. Klenner’s doses were enormous, flexible and symptom-driven. The sicker the patient, the higher the dose. Massive ascorbate treatment cured every one of 60 polio cases Klenner saw. He published his report in Southern Medicine and Surgery in July of 1949. (7) All patients were well in three days. None had any paralysis.

In a 1950 letter, Klenner wrote:



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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Hearing loss in one of ten cases of measles?


It makes it sound like there are a lot of us from my generation that can't hear. If they are thinking selective hearing loss is part of this, like when you don't hear what you don't want to hear, than they should say almost everyone has hearing loss.


Can't these people see that their evidence if flawed, don't they even look back at the hearing tests from the sixties in schools? Almost everyone had the measles back then and there was no difference, kids didn't listen to their teachers or parents back then, but could hear the ice cream truck coming from four blocks away.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by wrabbit2000


So, it's up to each person who may be in an area like Texas is notifying people of now. To vaccinate? Stay away from people who may be infected or nothing at all? It's a personal matter each has to live with the result.


With as many illegals in Texas, this would be a concern. Do they these shots in Mexico?



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by hiddencode
 


I agree with vaccinations not being as good as surviving it - in some cases, but at this point most are likely vaccinated. Kids can't go to childcare without them and have to have medical or religious exemptions for schools (if they even allow this in some districts/states). With professions such as the medical field or teaching you have to be vaccinated. Therefore its hard to believe 99% of the population isn't already Inoculated. If its spreading its because fewer people are protected via MMR, the vaccine isn't working like it should, or its just a coincidence people unprotected are coming into contact with it.

There was one vaccine (polio I think) where they discovered it wasn't quite a lifetime thing so were telling older people to redo it. Maybe they will something like this if this gets bigger (more to inject us with). Thanks for info.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


I really have no idea what Mexico's vaccination program might be or what they have for one at all on a universal level? I know the story says the cases come from someone who traveled outside the U.S., at least in part. However, they don't elaborate on where. Some areas overseas are having issues with this recently. It's hard to say where it came from....but if the immigrants are vaccinated for it and they come in near a carrier? 90% infection rate is an eye opener!



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
Can't these people see that their evidence if flawed, don't they even look back at the hearing tests from the sixties in schools? Almost everyone had the measles back then and there was no difference, kids didn't listen to their teachers or parents back then, but could hear the ice cream truck coming from four blocks away.


Actually, we didn't all have measles.

The first measles vaccines were available in 1963 (following the summer polio epidemics from the 1940's to 1950's, ended by Jonas Salk's vaccine). Parents hopped to get the vaccinations for their kids, just as EVERYONE got Salk's vaccine for their kids: en.wikipedia.org...

Vaccines came too late for some of my friends.





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