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This is quite an interesting tale

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posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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727sky --

Your original post reminds me of the fine British documentary series from the late 1970s Connections.

Each episode dealt with a piece of modern technology, but started way back hundreds or thousands of years ago, tracing all of the discoveries and inventions through history that were required to make that one modern piece of technology.

It's was a great documentary series. I think they are still on, with newer episodes, but the old original episodes are by far the best.

This idea of why railroads are the gauge that they are is exactly like the type of thing this series explored.


Here are a couple of the episodes:



And a Link to all 10 original episodes on YouTube:



edit on 8/17/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)
edit on 8/17/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by LABTECH767
 
Amazing find... Thanks for the link.



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 
With the setting being in NYC, shots of the WTC and Scandinavian flight 911 in the first 10 minutes... Creepy.
edit on 17/8/2013 by MarkJS because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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So, why didn't the title read: This is quite and interesting TAIL!



kidding, awesome stuff
edit on 17-8-2013 by Divine Strake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 

ah good story. Funny how everything is all just one long line going back into perpetuity and eternity of something else, we have become so accustomed to certain things and doing certain things in certain ways that we just are not aware of just how weird and bizarre they are. Most if not all of the things we do everything from roads to customs and holidays if you trace them back far enough are so bizzare that it just makes you go WTF! Really?



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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This article seems to disagree. www.snopes.com...



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Interesting ? You thought that was interesting ?



Hell I thought it was awesome.


SnF
edit on 17-8-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 07:24 PM
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Wonderful story op.



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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I like the way you think!
This is great, hope you don't mind I'm sharing it with everyone already, really made me laugh.

Pure genius man



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 09:19 PM
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Originally posted by 727Sky



So who built those old rutted roads?
Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads
in Europe (including Scotland ) for their legions.
Those roads have been used ever since.

And the ruts in the roads?
Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts,
Which everyone else had to match
for fear of destroying their wagon wheels..

Since the chariots were made for Imperial Rome ,
they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.
Therefore the United States standard railroad gauge
of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot.Bureaucracies live forever....



A very cool story on the surface, but unfortunately it may not be totally accurate, especially with regards to the claim about the "Roman War Chariot"

According to quite a few sources- Rome didn't use chariots for war, at all. They only used them for more ceremonial type events and mostly, chariot racing.

But your story has been debunked it seems.

How ever the 4 foot 8-1/2 inch track gauge happened, it’s clear that the Roman
military specification for “Chariots, War, Two-Horse” had nothing to do with it. While
many things “standardized” today were first documented in either military or federal
specifications – four-inch spacing of faucet’s for lavatories, standard sizes for floor tiles,
rules for statistical sampling – someone else gets credit for track gauge spacing. Many
believe that once an urban legend makes it to the Internet, it can never be undone.
Perhaps. But we in the standards community have a reputation for requiring data to
support contentions, and then challenging the data. So challenge the legend – when
confronted with the chariot story, email back the truth. Just maybe we can knock this one
legend off the tracks – whatever gauge they may be.

Source

Sorry dude
edit on 17-8-2013 by PhotonEffect because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by Rikku
i dont think the romans went to scotland.

I think someone else has already addressed this, but here's an extra wee bit of info. There's no written record of it, but there is an oral tradition that claims Pontius Pilate (of Jesus fame) was born in a village called Fortingall, Perthshire, Scotland. Fortingall also has possibly the oldest tree in Europe, a very old Yew tree.

Link



posted on Aug, 17 2013 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Thank you OP for the informative share.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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Very good story. I enjoyed reading it and I've learnt something new today



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Well Said,
and quite a nice adaptation of The True Scottish Lore.

Thanks for your updated version, and a healthy laugh...
HooHaa
S&F



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


That trigger effect series is amazing. I watched tue firt ep and wow.just wow.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by Rikku
 


Romans we're in Scotland as early as AD70 ...and were about for several hundreds of years before leaving...



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by 727Sky

Originally posted by Rikku
i dont think the romans went to scotland.


The arrival of Roman legions in Scotland c. AD 71 to their departure in 213 is widely accepted by most written historical accounts..


Not as any occupation; those dates are suspect.

The standard railway gauge in the US is simply the same as the most widely used (Stephenson's) in the UK, amongst several prevailing track gauges, at the time of early steam rail.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


I truly hope that horse was ok,.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by LABTECH767
reply to post by randyvs
 


I truly hope that horse was ok,.


Ouch! Ditto that. One day that just may lead into become a religion or a social measurement tool, who knows a whole host of governing techniques may arise from it. Go figure eh? Stranger things have happened.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Neet story but I actually dropped by to suggest that you give your kitty a parachute or close that hatch!






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