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(((The Sun Is Singing)))

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posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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A lot of news about the sun, mass coronal ejections, magnetic polar reversal and sun spots have been in the news, and a lot of fascinating "data" has been advanced by the SOHO satellites "watching" the sun, yet very little are aware that up until years ago, the Michelson Doppler Imager (which is still mounted on the SOHO but no longer transmitting) utilized a technique to catch and process, then form acoustic data taken from helioseismology.

Many have heard the sounds from the rings of Saturn, not a lot from our Sun.

Here is a snippet from Sanford.edu

Hear the Sun Sing Have you ever wondered what the Sun would sound like if you could hear it? Our Sun lies 93,000,000 miles away, surrounded by the vacuum of space. Sound won't travel through space, of course. But with the right instrument, scientists can "hear" pulsations from the Sun. The entire Sun vibrates from a complex pattern of acoustical waves, much like a bell. If your eyes were sharp enough, you could see a bell's surface jiggle in complex patterns as the waves bounced around within it. Likewise, astronomers at Stanford University can record acoustical pressure waves in the Sun by carefully tracking movements on the Sun's surface. To do this, they use an instrument called a Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), mounted on the SOHO spacecraft, circling the Sun 1,000,000 miles from Earth. The Sun's acoustical waves bounce from one side of the Sun to the other in about two hours, causing the Sun's surface to oscillate, or wiggle up and down. Because these sound waves travel underneath the Sun's surface, they are influenced by conditions inside the Sun. So scientists can use the oscillations to learn more about how the structure of the Sun's interior shapes its surface. The Sun's sound waves are normally at frequencies too low for the human ear to hear. To be able to hear them, the scientists sped up the waves 42,000 times -- and compressed 40 days of vibrations into a few seconds. What you'll be hearing are just a few dozen of the 10 million resonances echoing inside the Sun.


source: solar-center.stanford.edu...

My question is why would we quit listening to the Sun? Did it not produce any viable data? Is the MDI in disrepair, or is there something that's being "SUNg" that's not for "us?"

Here is a link to an audio clip of the sun "singing" : soi.stanford.edu...

The only time I can find this phenomenon was in the media was in the New York Times, here:


The Sun’s boiling and bubbling gases create a noisy throbbing, and the resulting sound waves are being used by scientists to study the interior of the star. But the sound waves are trapped inside the Sun, according to NASA scientists, and while they become visible as waves when they reach the surface, their frequencies are mostly too low to be heard by human ears — if a human were to be put in the unlikely position of being there. The study of the Sun using sound waves is called helioseismology, because it is much like the use of seismic waves to study the interior of the Earth. The waves were discovered half a century ago. Because space is a vacuum, the sound waves cannot not leave the Sun to be “heard” elsewhere. But scientists at Stanford University have condensed days of instrument readings of solar vibrations and speeded them up, posting them on a Web site, to let earthlings get an idea of one strand of the Sun’s bell-like or drumlike resonances. The instrument used to collect the sounds is the Michelson Doppler Imager, on board SOHO, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, which was launched into orbit in 1995.


source: www.nytimes.com...




posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by OldSkullJedi
 


Here is a bigger clip



Sounds like my car



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


your youtube video verses the audio clips from stanford sound entirely different.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by Spacespider
reply to post by OldSkullJedi
 


Here is a bigger clip



Sounds like my car


Eerie isnt it sounds familiar though was this ever used in the sound track of a movie?? It definitely reminds me of something.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 07:46 PM
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So many things being found to sing. Animals, plants... the sun. I wonder how many of these frequency patterns are conditioned to sound like music. The difference in the two separate examples given, matches the difference in singing studies done with plants. One set being bleeps and clicks, the others must have been matched with more soothing notes picked and planned by the available pattern. I see the value in the science but find the singing concept as humans creating art from nature.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by Spacespider
 


Originally posted by Spacespider
Sounds like my car


Do you drive a Telsa?



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 05:39 AM
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Yes the sun is singing in a sense and its heard by the HAARP website and you can also hear it just simply click on the listen tab and you will hear it.



posted on Aug, 18 2013 @ 05:44 AM
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Yes the sun is singing in a sense and its heard by the HAARP website and you can also hear it just simply click on the listen tab and you will hear it.




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