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Scanning Finger Prints at Busch Gardens, Virginia

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posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:44 AM
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We just went on a short vacation to Virginia Beach and Williamsburg, Virginia. Part of that vacation included a day at Busch Gardens. After purchasing tickets at one window, people are then required to show tickets at the main entrance gate. While in line there, I saw finger print scanners at the entrance. Many people were being required to have their right index fingers scanned to go in. It wasn't everyone. It was every few people or so. This was in addition to the entrance tickets they were holding.

The couple in front of me had to give their finger prints. They were an older couple. Maybe in their 60's. Then I saw a family with kids next to us having to give their fingers to be scanned. Everyone complied. When it came our turn, we weren't told to have our fingers scanned. So I'm not sure why some people are scanned and others aren't.

This shocked me. People were giving their fingers over to be scanned. These easily can be stored on a data base somewhere. No one even so much as blinked when told to put their fingers in the scanners. They just did it ... no questions asked. Easy peasy ....

When we got home yesterday, I googled and found that Busch Gardens and Disney World both use finger scanners. These places claim that they are not keeping personal information. (yeah, right
) and I read in some chat forums that people think this scanning is to filter pedophiles out. (again .. yeah, right
)

This is rather invasive AND could easily be abused by the corporations/government.
But the people just give their prints over to the corporation. No questions asked.




VACATION SIDE NOTES .. for anyone interested ...
Busch 'Gardens' doesn't really have gardens. It was just like any other amusement park. I didn't go on any rides (health reasons) but my husband and daughter went on them and liked them. I didn't eat there, but my husband and daughter did and they really liked the food. The stuffed animals weren't plush but instead were cheap rip offs (low class!) and the trinkets in the gift shops were also cheaply made and over priced. All in all, it wasn't worth the $70 to get in for the day. Overpriced. And to call it Busch 'Gardens' is silly. Disney or Hershey Park have a nicer set up with the flowers and shrubs, etc. Also while there we went to the Edgar Cayce center in Virginia Beach (I'd love to go back and spend some more time there) and we took a boat tour of the Navy Port and saw all the big ships (and both the USS COLE and IKE Aircraft Carrier were in dock). That was something I could do and was fun.

edit on 8/16/2013 by FlyersFan because: added the part about the USS Cole and Aircraft Carrier IKE




posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Behold that prize of liberty and freedom the United States of finger scanning. Eye Retina scanning wont be long off.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:49 AM
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Years ago I had a season pass to a theme park and they did this, but only for season pass holders as a method of proving that the person using the season pass was the person who purchased it. The irony is that I only went to the park one time and made the decision to purchase the season pass because it was only a few dollars more than a one day ticket - so I figured pay the extra in case I wanted to return later in the season.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:55 AM
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if they were doing it to "protect against pedophiles" wouldn't it make more sense to "fingerprint" everyone? or to be honest for any "security" reasons they should be doing everyone. to just do "some" people makes no sense.


you mentioned one set of people fingerprinted was a family with kids, were the kids also fingerprinted? it might make some sense i guess if they were "fingerprinting" parents and children on both the way in AND out, as an insurance against kidnapping, but as you said an old couple without children were also fingerprinted. so again it really dosn't seem to make any sense.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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Everyone in the US now should go and register copyright on their own finger print and retina patterns, and place disclaimers against their access of use in any form or manner without their own express permission.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:00 AM
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If you have a problem with it you are some sort of terrorist.

It some how, at some point, makes something safer, probably, so why are you against it?



*i actually do agree with you but this what the government will say to excuse more privacy violation*



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:02 AM
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reply to post by Biigs
 





If you have a problem with it you are some sort of terrorist.

It some how, at some point, makes something safer, probably, so why are you against it?



*i actually do agree with you but this what the government will say to excuse more privacy violation*



Is what you wrote for real...gibberish garbage. A persons fingerprints are as personal as their credit card pin number.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:10 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


I remember Alex Jones doing his patented "Jonesing it up" over a theme park doing the finger print scanning, can't remember which park it was now, but this was a long long time ago, it's been going on for some time. I was at Disney in Florida in the mid 90's and don't recall any scanning.

Some parks also offer RFID bracelets for young kids so they can be tracked through the park, they also work as tickets for rides. I believe AJ blew a gasket over those too.

I'm surprised by what you described though, random finger print scanning, I'd assume it's an opt in thing like a fast pass but it sounds more like those random airport screenings from what you described. I wonder if any of the people would have been refused entrance if they declined to get scanned.

Is it possible these people who were scanned had different types of park passes than you did?



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:14 AM
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It makes you wonder what would happen if someone's fingerprint came up on some government database somewhere. If they were wanted for outstanding tickets or something, would the authorities be contacted? Do they have a SWAT team standing by in case someone really IS on a pedophile list somewhere?



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by FortAnthem
 


What happens if you serve coffee, and your prints are on the cup you give to a person who commits some terrible crimes and leaves the cup at the scene.

Years later you are finger printed for absolutely no reason at Disney world. Your prints now place you at the scene of the crime and due to you selling the criminal the drink locally, puts you as a likely suspect who 'operates' in the area. Now you have to spend THOUSANDS of dollars on lawyers to make your case that you are in fact a honest law abiding citizen.

Or even simpler, you fall over and cut your body leaving a drop of blood in some random location that one day has a crime committed in the vicinity. Well you are safe until Disney world decides to broaden its "security".

This should come under 'reasonable cause' for your privacy to be invaded. That is how the law is meant to work, innocent till proven guilty - not, assume everyone will do something wrong one day so get all their private information now.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:23 AM
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Originally posted by generik
you mentioned one set of people fingerprinted was a family with kids, were the kids also fingerprinted?

I didn't notice if the kids were finger print scanned or not. I saw the dad put his finger in the scanner. When googling info on this, I saw people talking about kids not being scanned at Disney World. But that's just what others have said on this in their own chat rooms so I can't verify or anything ...



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:24 AM
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Originally posted by Biigs
If you have a problem with it you are some sort of terrorist.

If they had told us to put our fingers in the scanners, we wouldn't have done it.
I don't know what would have happened.
I don't know if we would have been let in anyways, or told to leave.
Either way .. they'd have our credit card # and would have been able to flag us as 'problem people'.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
I'm surprised by what you described though, random finger print scanning,

It seemed random to me. Some people were told to put their fingers in the scanners. Others weren't.
We were not. The older couple in front of us were. The family with little kids were.
I don't know if it is the kind of ticket they purchased ... or if it's just random ...
I don't know how the park determines which people were to be scanned and which weren't.
All I know is that each entrance point had a finger print scanner and they were all being used ...



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 06:48 AM
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I don't know if its the same type of scanner, but our local YMCA requires an index finger scan to enter through their turnstile. Technology can be a great thing, but at the same time it's becoming invasive. It's a delicate balance between security and privacy. Unfortunately, I think government will always side with the security aspects of technology.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 07:13 AM
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They do the same thing as seaworld.

One of the things that make me laugh at the USA claim of "land of the free"


On one vist my finger prints were taken 4 times!!!!! 4!!!!!!

I have visted many countrys and NEVER has such personal details been demanded from ne.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by crazyewok
 


Dont forget that they have been recording your face for years and years. The fingerprint is just as personal only it requires you to do something.

When did my face stop being enough to identify me?



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 08:00 AM
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I don't really see a problem. It is most likely a low resolution image in a closed system.

I took some train trips and while in the Chicago station wanted to stow my bags away during the wait. The lockers all are fingerprint scanned as well as pin numbered. It wasn't reading my finger when I tried to get them out; I looked for a customer service person, who explained all that to me. It is so low resolution, if you finger is just at a different angle, you washed your hands, you have something on your hands, your hands are cold, and the screen being dirty were all things he dealt with every day, all day. A high resolution print would read better because it would have more points of comparison. A low res therefore would not be any good on an open network for comparison for any reason.

Take a breath! If you didn't know what type of tickets the others held, and didn't think to ask at the time, why worry about it now?

The alternatives are also something you don't want. Have you ever had your name stolen? I did. Someone was using my name and employment history to get pay day loans. HE, which is important because my real given name is STAR which is considered by pretty much the rest of the population to be feminine, did not have any ID with that name on it, but was able to produce enough information to get money. He didn't have my SS number either, just my name. I found out only because I was asked 5 times in the space of 2 hours to verify my employment....which meant I was at work, and not standing there waiting for money. It took several months, lots of threatening phone calls from people who did not verify the ID and loaned money to someone else, and an investigation by the Postmaster General's office to get the matter cleared up. Had someone taken a fingerprint for comparison, this would not have happened at all.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 08:06 AM
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don't go any longer, pretty simple just starve the bastards out of existence, that's my plan anyway.

if the big corp theme parks wanna play, so can i, by not going to visit them and giving them my money, soon they will be re-thinking a few policies.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
Some parks also offer RFID bracelets for young kids so they can be tracked through the park, they also work as tickets for rides. I believe AJ blew a gasket over those too.
The finger print gambit is bogus and I would refuse on principal. Same as the bank asking me for my Social Insurance Number when I recently set up an account for a not-for-profit. They don't like hearing 'No...even the government says you have no right to it'. But RFID bracelets on the kids? Brilliant! Makes them easier to find if they wander. Implanted?...well, not so good.



posted on Aug, 16 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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If you have the season pass, they scan your fingerprint to make sure the person entering is the actual card holder, and not someone else.
Example: say FlyersFan and I are friends, she wants to go to the park. I have a 2 year, 2 park pass. She gives me $50.00 so she can use my pass and not pay the 70.00 for the day pass. She goes to enter, but because our prints don't match, she's denied entry. It's a security mechanism. EVERYONE that has a seasonal pass gets scanned
That's from a friend of mine that works at the park

edit on 8/16/2013 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)



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