Brazil's Amazonian Kawahiva Tribe Caught On Tape. Newly released video.

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posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 09:45 PM
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A newly released video captures the first fleeting images of an indigenous tribe living in Brazil's Amazon jungle that is thought to have had very little contact with the outside world.

To me this video feels very intrusive -




The images show several members of the Kawahiva tribe walking through dense foliage. Naked men carry bows and arrows, and a woman totes a child on her back. The woman runs away after noticing the camera, and one man briefly doubles back to investigate. Loggers first reported the existence of the Kawahiva in 1999. A reservation was created last year in the western state of Mato Grosso, but members of the tribe still face grave threats from loggers and farmers. The video was shot in 2011 by the government's agency overseeing indigenous matters, but was only released on Wednesday.


Strange in this day and age, amazing that the video footage is only 2 years old.

I dont know why we cant just leave people alone, you can hear the distress in the woman's voice once she notices the camera, poor folk, I doubt they have long left living peacefully.

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edit on 14-8-2013 by Lady_Tuatha because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 10:02 PM
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It's a little weird to be filming people without consent, almost treating them like a nature documentary, not sure about intrusive though as they can't really claim to own the land even if they have lived there for thousands of years. Gaining a bit of knowledge about their culture might help protect them in the future if the threat of logging etc becomes apparent.



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by twfau
It's a little weird to be filming people without consent, almost treating them like a nature documentary, not sure about intrusive though as they can't really claim to own the land even if they have lived there for thousands of years. Gaining a bit of knowledge about their culture might help protect them in the future if the threat of logging etc becomes apparent.



man. that's the problem.

How can someone tell people that have been living somewhere for THOUSANDS of years


Modern Man- "you don't own this land"

Tribal Dude - "oh, and you do?"

Modern Man - "yeah, its mine"

Tribal Dude - "nope, I'd say its mine. You see my tribe has walked/hunted/lived/died/born on/buried on this land since time eternal"

Modern Man - " do you have the deed?"

Tribal Dude - "wtf?"

Modern Man - "this piece of paper says I am the owner."

Tribal Dude - " I thought possession was 9/10ths law"

Modern Man -"Too bad, I have a piece of paper, what do you have"

Tribal Dude - "I have spear"





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