Any tips or tricks to working with a chainsaw?

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posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I haven't had very good luck with Poulan chain saws. I call them Pull Ons because after a little use that's all you seem to do. Have had real good results with Husqvarna but they are more expensive.

Pladuim




posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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Three pages in and nobody has mentioned chaps?

A very wise investment. If you like your limbs and other appendages.
www.amazon.com...=pd_bxgy_hi_text_z



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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Nicest saw I ever had the pleasure of using was my brother in law's Husquvarna 455 Rancher:
www.husqvarna.com...

It was a used blade but it still walked through 18"+ diameter trunks, limbs and branches With Ease.

90 degree sideways cut through a near 20" base took only a few minutes.


Good tip to remember:
Some times you just have to let the saw sit so the blade can cool down.

It doesn't have to be dull to throw out fine [near sawdust] cuttings. just being too hot will result in the same thing. a mere 3-5 minutes is often all it takes.




edit on 8/12/2013 by 12m8keall2c because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Yep, I figured out the heat thing too...somehow just instinctively knew I had to give it a break.....

To others: I actually have a Husqvarna riding mower and weed whacker, and both are pretty decent. I really wasn't expecting this kind of heavy need for a more robust chainsaw when I went with the Poulan. If such things keep being necessary, I'll likely get a more professional grade Husqvarna one next time. The one I wanted at Tractor Supply was a bit pricey for the wife at the time...but if I need to, I can make the case for it...(Though she'll never go for a $400 chainsaw).... Still, so far, I've been pleasantly surprised at how well it's going through them. I'll have to take some pics so you can see what I'm up against.

Basically what I have to saw up....



Thanks for all the help though guys, it's really appreciated (and nice to know I'm doing some things right in this...)
edit on 12-8-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Ummm make sure there is petrol in it before you get a hernia swinging it get it started, and keep an eye on the oil level. but seriously make sure the chain oil is kept topped up. if not the chain will overheat, you will notice a kind of bluey color on the chain from overheating, and when the saw is stopped after doing some cutting NEVER touch the chain, it is extremely hot, other than that, work away, oh ya might want to save some sawdust for the rabbits hutch, or did ya cut that up too



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by flipflop
 


I've been wondering if I should rent a wood chipper and make some more sawdust out of some of this brush. Just not sure if the wood type (oak) is going to be useful for my needs (like for the rabbits and horse stalls). But, it will be WAY more firewood than I'll need. (I might sell/trade excess too).



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Make sure you don't get the bar and chain bound up, one of two things can happen, you will bend the bar, or it will bounce out and hit you in the knee or the head, so be careful. I had a boss of mine damn near took off his knee cap that way.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 04:06 PM
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You've already got some solid tips so there's not really much I can add but the one thing I had the most trouble with using a chainsaw was filing the chain properly. You can go to Lowe's and get a chain file that attaches to the saw bar and does it perfectly, as long as it is mounted right, for like 20 to 30 dollars. Or you can get a handle with a guide that just attaches to a handheld file for less than 10. I bought the cheaper one and it has lines on it which keep your file straight while sharpening and that made such a huge difference. You know your saw is cutting good when it throws large chips out and doesn't bog as much when you put a little strain on it going through a log.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Oak a good hardwood, and it's used to smoke eel's and prob other fish too, maybe trout and salmon. but fish sure is nice when smoked with oak....



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
Yep, it's tricky, because to start it, you have to put it on the ground and use a foot to hold secure. I've been starting it up either in the garage or by the horse walker, where I have some concrete to securely hold it with my foot, while the blade is over the edge and touching only air. I then just carry it, while idling, to where I need to use it. A pain if it stops though...more walking, but I've heard too much about the dirt.


To avoid this, the best way to start the saw is to pinch it between your thighs in front of you. This is your other safe method for positioning a saw to start..



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


CAREFUL there is a condition know in the UK as industrial white finger, working with vibrating tools caused both nerve and joint damage so I would not want to get used to it.
A better chain saw with better shock absorption may be a thought but limit the time you use it, casual use should be ok but regular then familiarise yourself with the medical implications.
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 12-8-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 06:18 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Yep, I figured out the heat thing too...somehow just instinctively knew I had to give it a break.....

To others: I actually have a Husqvarna riding mower and weed whacker, and both are pretty decent. I really wasn't expecting this kind of heavy need for a more robust chainsaw when I went with the Poulan. If such things keep being necessary, I'll likely get a more professional grade Husqvarna one next time. The one I wanted at Tractor Supply was a bit pricey for the wife at the time...but if I need to, I can make the case for it...(Though she'll never go for a $400 chainsaw).... Still, so far, I've been pleasantly surprised at how well it's going through them. I'll have to take some pics so you can see what I'm up against.

Basically what I have to saw up....



Thanks for all the help though guys, it's really appreciated (and nice to know I'm doing some things right in this...)
edit on 12-8-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)


OHHHH, you should make a survival shelter, or just test your know how.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:26 PM
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Hello I use a chain saw often. Here is some tips.

1. Wear heavy gloves or anti vibration gloves.
2. Always keep the saw sharp if it is dull it is more likely to kick back. buy a chain file and you may also need a mill bastard file.
3. Never keep the chain bar in line with your head or body while cutting.
4. Always make sure the bar oil is always flowing to the chain while cutting.
5.Use supreme gas only when you go to fill your tank at the pump put the first gallon into your tank and then fill your can. The ethanol in regular and mid grade gas will kill your small engine. At the pump the hose of the gas pump will hold 3/4 of a gallon of the previously pumped gas.

!2 hours for one tree Is about 6 times longer than it should have taken maybe 12 times. You need to sharpen that chain.or get a bigger saw. A Husquavarna or a Stihl are the best and used by professionals A husquavarna 136 is a good size for most home owners.If you own a few achers of land go to a 455 rancher lots of power awesome saw. Hope this helps. Any questions message me back.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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Ok just seen a picture of your tree it is a big tree. Around 2 hours to limb and chunk up and about two hours to clean up the branches and stuff niece tree.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by Kreyvic
reply to post by Gazrok
 


Learn to sharpen your chain,either by hand or electric sharpener and always carry two or three sharpened chains with you so you can swap out your chain in the woods if need be. I prefer to have a couple chains with me so i don't waste time sharpening them when i am working.


This is good advice.
I have three chains and sharpen them often. It makes the work go faster and reduces vibration. Every 5th day of work with one, I get it sharpened at the store where I bought the chainsaw. They have the tools to get it all back in order after I've sharpened it by hand several times.
The chains last longer and stay sharper if they are professionally done every so often.

Chains don't cost much compared to time saved.

Oh yeah,
Be careful out there.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:07 PM
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Never hold a chainsaw in one hand and the wood, limb you are cutting in the other. And by some chance you do never I repeat never through the wood under the bar.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by tjack
Let the saw pull itself up to the dogs (sharp pointy grippers near the base of the blade) until they grip the log. Then lift the handle so the blade tip cuts downward into the wood some amount. Then pull the saw backward a little (off the dogs) while letting the tip pivot back upward, and once again let the saw pull into the dogs again and pivot the blade downward, kind of a rocking horse or see-saw motion with the blade.

This lets the saw and gravity do most of the work, if you find yourself manhandling the saw, chances are there's a better technique.

Also, keep the blade out of the dirt, it only takes a second for mother earth do dull a fresh blade.


What he said.....

Also since your new to it I would recommend chain saw chaps to protect your legs.

also, don't stand right over the saw.....stay a little to the side because if it kicks back it can get you in the face.

I worked for Asplundh Tree Service for years as a foreman and dropped more trees in 8 years and bucked them up than most people will cut in a lifetime.

Also, you may feel stupid but a hardhat has saved my brain more than once....

And people.... If your dropping a tree DO NOT underestimate how many thousands of pounds the tree can weigh depending on the size of it. On some large Ponderosa pines I have had 4 ropes snap on one tree because they couldn't hold the weight and they were all rated at 10,000 pounds.

If your dropping trees and don't know what your doing you can be dead real fast....or somebody else with you can be.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by mwood
And people.... If your dropping a tree DO NOT underestimate how many thousands of pounds the tree can weigh depending on the size of it


THAT. right there. ^^^


SAGE ADVICE.

ANY tree can pivot, once cut, in ways you can try to plan for, but it doesn't play out that way in the end.

Here's a fine example that ended in the fellers death by crushing:


ALWAYS attempt to consider each and every possible outcome from ANY cut you make to a downed tree.

i've personally experienced some rather hairy scenarios myself, and have had to watch numerous others where the feller's 'calculations' went awry in the end.

Never a good thing when you're dealing with so much unanticipated dead weight being set free be the mere cutting of a limb, brnahc, base or what have you.

ALWAYS use EXTREME CAUTION and be well AWARE of all potential outcomes, despite and no matter the precautions, tie-downs, etc taken in the process.

Sometimes you only get THAT one shot.

You or The Tree.

saw safe , folks.

Saw safe.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:55 PM
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Learn to properly sharpen your blade
Don't run blade into the dirt or it will instantly dull blade

own extra chainsaw to help cut out saw you got stuck

grease tip, add bar oil every time you refuel
beware of large trees that are doddie in the heart/tree rot...wrap and lock logging chain or pressure strap around them so they dont flag/split and kill you


learn directional stresses on logs and branches, whether on the ground or in the air
learn to cut from underneath and above branches when under pressure so you don't trap your bar


always keep your work area clean, cuz you might trip and hurt your lil self..or others


take breaks often, never get in a hurry..enjoy the great outdoors


DANGER...beware of widow makers...dead and rotten limbs/hangers....some way tons and will mash your lil head


when filing blade...remember the cutting grooves only go one direction...do not saw with file to sharpen blade..it will kill your file


never nose in to anything, ever...just saying


learn to use your chain break , use it often, especially when dragging brush, and accidents


learn to adjust your carburetor settings so your saw doesn't fowl out

Wear steel toed boots with good grip...redwings are the best
Wear impact helmet when felling trees.

learn which way to run and always make sure you have a clear escape root....remember to let go of the saw
when running .HAHAHAHA



ONE MORE THING
when felling trees, make sure the tree has a clear path, hanging trees into other trees is very time consuming to get loose , unless you have a good truck or tractor, and very dangerous to remedy
edit on 12-8-2013 by SPECULUM because: ETC





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