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How does thought generate action potential in the Brain?

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posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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Action potential comes from your 5 senses. If someone touches your arm, a signal is sent to the brain and the brain interprets the signal. Also, how can the brain interpret and give meaning to a signal sent to the brain? When you have a thought, idea or recall a specific memory at will, what creates the action potential?

In science, there's a popular notion that mind emerges from the material brain. This is silly and there's zero evidence to support it. It's just a huge assumption that some accept as fact.

I believe the brain is a network of computers called Neurons. Synapses are like bits of information or on/off switches that transmit information across these Neurons. There also has to be an Operator or Mind that can look at the information processed by the 5 senses and construct a reality. A 6th sense if you will that can exert it's will on the material brain and create action potential.

Any artificial intelligent brain will have to have an operating system that mimic the Mind. IBM is working on a new computer that mimics the brain.


To create a computer as powerful as the human brain, perhaps we first need to build one that works more like a brain. Today, at the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks in Dallas, IBM researchers will unveil a radically new computer architecture designed to bring that goal within reach. Using simulations of enormous complexity, they show that the architecture, named TrueNorth, could lead to a new generation of machines that function more like biological brains.

Most modern computer systems are built on the Von Neumann architecture—with separate units for storing information and processing it sequentially—and they use programming languages designed specifically for that architecture. Instead, TrueNorth stores and processes information in a distributed, parallel way, like the neurons and synapses in a brain.

Modha’s team has also developed software that runs on a conventional supercomputer but simulates the functioning of a massive network of neurosynaptic cores—with 100 trillion virtual synapses and 2 billion neurosynaptic cores.

Each core of the simulated neurosynaptic computer contains its own network of 256 “neurons,” which operate using a new mathematical model. In this model, the digital neurons mimic the independent nature of biological neurons, developing different response times and firing patterns in response to input from neighboring neurons.

“Programs” are written using special blueprints called corelets. Each corelet specifies the basic functioning of a network of neurosynaptic cores. Individual corelets can be linked into more and more complex structures—nested, Modha says, “like Russian dolls.”


www.technologyreview.com...

So the computer will allow for Neurons to act as seperate networks carrying out different functions. This is the Human Brain. Each Neuron is a computer. The Operator or Mind constructs a perceived reality based on information that the brain processes. The Mind generates action potential in the brain at will without touch, taste, seeing, hearing or tasting.




posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by neoholographic
In science, there's a popular notion that mind emerges from the material brain. This is silly and there's zero evidence to support it. It's just a huge assumption that some accept as fact.


Interesting thread.

Where is the least silly place for the 'mind' to be if it isn't an emergent property of the brain?

How do you explain brain injuries that affect the operation of the mind?

I see action potentials as being generated continuously to try to minimise neuron activity in certain regions of the brain. In conscious creatures these potentials are then passed to the consciousness to give it a chance to reject them. That's why we can detect actions arising in the brain well before they are acted on. If it isn't rejected the action appears to be pre-ordained.

In simpler creatures these potentials simply pass through a magnitude comparitor meaning the strongest potential is simply acted on.


edit on 11/8/2013 by EasyPleaseMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by EasyPleaseMe
In conscious creatures these potentials are then passed to the consciousness to give it a chance to reject them.


Can you describe what you think may be the simplest explanation or mechanism of what 'conciseness' is?

You say potentials are passed to 'the consciousness'. What could conciseness possibly be? How can its system and platform be oriented and performing, what is physically,mechanically,chemically,electrically,energetically going on that allows something like 'the consciousness' to exist and work?

Consciousness very simply put, seems to be a sort of mirror which is aware of what is being reflected in it.
edit on 11-8-2013 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-8-2013 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by ImaFungi

Originally posted by EasyPleaseMe
In conscious creatures these potentials are then passed to the consciousness to give it a chance to reject them.


Can you describe what you think may be the simplest explanation or mechanism of what 'conciseness' is?

You say potentials are passed to 'the consciousness'. What could conciseness possibly be? How can its system and platform be oriented and performing, what is physically,mechanically,chemically,electrically,energetically going on that allows something like 'the consciousness' to exist and work?

Consciousness very simply put, seems to be a sort of mirror which is aware of what is being reflected in it.


I can't pretend to be able to explain much about consciousness, but I try to analyse the way I and others work. I tend to agree with you that part of consciousness is a self reflection system.

I work with a leading neuroscientist and even he can't explain consciousness...

It's late here now so I will try to answer better tomorrow.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by EasyPleaseMe
 


Nice, can you ask him my questions. I know he and noone knows, but what do they think? What are the theories and hypotheses?

Something I wrote in another thread, that relates to my line of inquiry;

Regarding the nature and reality of the mind/imagination. When I say, dog, cat, car, house, hamburger, you can see these things I am saying. I am wondering what do you think of the 'space' in which you see these images? Is the space real 3-d? Or is it a digital projection of some kind? When you have a dream and interact with people and circumvent a scene is your 'point' of awareness traveling through a real space, or is there a finite manifold, with its pixels in which all the things you imagine and think are project on, like an Escher sketch of some kind? And I dont think in 3-d manifold anything 2-d exists, so im guessing the imagination would have to be some type of 3-d phenomenon. Im wondering the nature of the information, is the information of words and definitions stored analogly as in molecules taking on the physical shape of words, or is it digital, in that A is represented by a certain flux of electrons, and B another, and the word Boy by the sequence of fluxes, and the meaning of boy by more still? So is this a digital process? Where physical 'bits' electrons (synapses, neurons, electric pulses) = and has the ability to create something, it is not. Complex pseudo physical reality in the realm of mind. Dreams with homes, and colors, and sensation and dialogue and plot, and insight and emotion, how are those things being caused by just different patterns of electrical pulses? And could It be similar to how electrical pulses in a computer can result in the projection and tinkering with game play on a computer screen? Also its amazing how many memories are stored, the things you can recall, the details, things youve heard, places youve been, how youve felt, people youve met, things youve read. Its also elusive to my mind, how memories can possibly be recalled; when I say think of a child hood memory, or think of the first girl you kissed (if you have kissed a girl) what is the process from going from blank state to 'searching for a memory' and retrieving it. Its quite remarkable.
edit on 11-8-2013 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 09:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by neoholographic
Action potential comes from your 5 senses. If someone touches your arm, a signal is sent to the brain and the brain interprets the signal. Also, how can the brain interpret and give meaning to a signal sent to the brain? When you have a thought, idea or recall a specific memory at will, what creates the action potential?

In science, there's a popular notion that mind emerges from the material brain. This is silly and there's zero evidence to support it. It's just a huge assumption that some accept as fact.

I believe the brain is a network of computers called Neurons. Synapses are like bits of information or on/off switches that transmit information across these Neurons. There also has to be an Operator or Mind that can look at the information processed by the 5 senses and construct a reality. A 6th sense if you will that can exert it's will on the material brain and create action potential.

Any artificial intelligent brain will have to have an operating system that mimic the Mind. IBM is working on a new computer that mimics the brain.


To create a computer as powerful as the human brain, perhaps we first need to build one that works more like a brain. Today, at the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks in Dallas, IBM researchers will unveil a radically new computer architecture designed to bring that goal within reach. Using simulations of enormous complexity, they show that the architecture, named TrueNorth, could lead to a new generation of machines that function more like biological brains.

Most modern computer systems are built on the Von Neumann architecture—with separate units for storing information and processing it sequentially—and they use programming languages designed specifically for that architecture. Instead, TrueNorth stores and processes information in a distributed, parallel way, like the neurons and synapses in a brain.

Modha’s team has also developed software that runs on a conventional supercomputer but simulates the functioning of a massive network of neurosynaptic cores—with 100 trillion virtual synapses and 2 billion neurosynaptic cores.

Each core of the simulated neurosynaptic computer contains its own network of 256 “neurons,” which operate using a new mathematical model. In this model, the digital neurons mimic the independent nature of biological neurons, developing different response times and firing patterns in response to input from neighboring neurons.

“Programs” are written using special blueprints called corelets. Each corelet specifies the basic functioning of a network of neurosynaptic cores. Individual corelets can be linked into more and more complex structures—nested, Modha says, “like Russian dolls.”


www.technologyreview.com...

So the computer will allow for Neurons to act as seperate networks carrying out different functions. This is the Human Brain. Each Neuron is a computer. The Operator or Mind constructs a perceived reality based on information that the brain processes. The Mind generates action potential in the brain at will without touch, taste, seeing, hearing or tasting.


Good observation, but IMO, mistaken conclusions.

The IBM work.while notable, does not mimic a human brain, not even the brain of a cretin. It may, at best, model some aspects of insect or reptilian brains.

My basis for this statement is that the IBM work bypasses the analog component of brain. Back in about 1960 when brain modeling experiments were in their infancy, an electrical engineer, Alwyn C. Scott set up a simple neuron modeling circuit, using 16 electronic neuristors. His circuitry effectively modeled neural mechanics. It also demonstrated analog waveforms (phase space information) that persisted as a function of diverse circuit setup conditions. (i.e.boundary conditions)

If I assess your posts correctly, the brain is a computer. No news here. But where is the OS?

Pursue your observation a bit further. Does not the question boil down to, "Where are the minds who program the OS?" (And the ROM, and the programs that the computer runs?)

May I offer a small observation? Use of the phrase, "if you will," makes the user sound like Lou Dobbs, Bill Moyers, and other pseudo-intellectuals. IMO people like yourself who have genuinely useful insights should avoid using the not-cool catch-phrases commonly employed by TV nitwits. On the internet, your personal credibility is the only thing you can bring to the table.

Finally, neurons are not networks (as transistors are not computers). Neurons are components of a network. Their closest analogy to computers is that they behave like a flip-flop circuit. Neurons are not computers. They are to computers as the beads on an abacus are to the frame that contains them.

IMO additional research (not TV or pop sci magazines) would guide your natural talents.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 10:38 PM
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I would say that there isn't one right way to design a conscious machine. As evolution has shown us, there can be many solutions to the same problem which all work just fine. I'm sure if other sentient life exists in this universe, their brains would be nothing like our brains. Their brains would probably have similarities and things in common with our brains, but they would also have large differences. However, the things they have in common are probably the things we want to pay attention to, because they might be the things which allow us experience this strange thing we call self awareness or consciousness. I created a thread a few days ago which seems very relevant to this discussion:

Determinism and Consciousness

I think the phenomena we call consciousness is a result of many extremely complex systems working together in a very complex way. The way it actually works is probably so complex we'll never fully comprehend every facet of it because it's beyond the ability of the human brain to fully grasp such a complex architecture. But I definitely think quantum mechanics and true randomness plays a part in it. I have an extremely hard time believing that our brains are just classical deterministic machines, because if they are we have no free will. The real problem of creating a self aware machine is giving it the "free will" to be something more than just an algorithm.
edit on 13/8/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



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