The Difficulties of Self-Publishing

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posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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Continued from last post...

TheToastmanCometh
Graphic novels are practically the same process, the only difference you have is that you will be populating your work with images. It will probably be a larger amount of work to format and make sure everything lines up correctly, but I can't see any issues that you may have. You have two paths that you can follow.

eBooks
It may be an idea to ensure that your images are in jpg or png format, just in case readers on the other end are limited by their software. These formats are the most popular at the moment, and the most widely supported, so it should allow viewership as broadly as possible.

If you are planning to print, ensure that you have a printer that can handle the images you are using. If you have a high number of colours, you may need a stronger paper to accommodate for that. Print or digital, the same standards apply. Ensure that the images are all the same format, that the fonts are all the same, your spelling is all correct, and so on. You may want to do some research into the different ebook readers and their screen sizes, resolutions etc, even test your files on some if you get the opportunity.

Formats you would go for here are epub, mobi, even pdf can be used, but try to create the file that your publishing house uses, otherwise you may lose some formatting during conversion. The advantage here is that all these files work on HTML, so you can use the basic editor to get your layout, then adjust using the HTML backend to get the finer points just the way you want them.

There are loads of different formats that you can choose from listed here: en.wikipedia.org...

But I would highly recommend the ones stated above, as they are becoming the industry standard.

eComic
These work a little differently, though my experience with them is practically nil. As I understand, you populate the file with a series of images, adjusting frames as you go, and fitting them to the page as you see fit. Formatting is handled entirely by the file and reader, so generally the work as WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get).

You can find a little information about the specific file types here: en.wikipedia.org...

As I said, I have very little knowledge of this side of editing, and as a result, would recommend standard epub files as a starting point. Only if you find that they don't suit your needs would I say to try another avenue.

Software
I use a little free program called Sigil. It's fantastic, and has all the features required for basic book creation. There are others (Adobe has a package, but its name eludes me), but they are generally paid software and, as with most of Adobe's stuff, have more features than you would ever need.

Hope this helps!

Aelanne
If you're looking for a cheaper option for print books, CreateSpace may be the way to go. I get a print copy of my paperback, just shy of 300 pages, for around $4 plus shipping. Hard covers are obviously going to be more expensive, but I do think they were well below $10, best to check it out rather than take my word for it.

As for editing, they provide an online preview system, which means you can upload your file, check it on the website, then simply adjust the file and reupload if you have any issues. There are no fees for their services, or any others that I have already spoken about, excepting printing costs and royalties, all of which are handled automatically.

Phew, this was another long one! Can't wait to hear more from you all!

S. J. Vellenga




posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 05:44 AM
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So many people have offered up quite a few good ideas and resources. Honestly, with the internet it is actually far easier to self publish today than in many decades past. When I was able to get my first comic published (when I was 20 -mind you I am 40 now) I was at the absolute mercy of publishers -mostly independent ones. I was foolish, eager and didn't know better. I ended up offering over much of my original artwork to a small Canadian independent publisher. They put my comic out - helped me go to a handful of Canadian and Midwest conventions (I did get to meet GWAR!) and such when I was honestly just a kid. Then they disappeared with my original art, all the possibility of original artwork and so on. Even now, decades later, I mention that comic as a small note in my bio with a few art samples I still have and I remember the experience.

As a much older person attempting to self publish books and graphic novels, I remember those times. I've learned that CreateSpace.com is a wonderful place to self publish -if you know what you're doing. My product from them (books and art books) looks incredible. However, when I do have issues I run through this gauntlet of key-word inspired emails that attempt to help me before I get any actual one on one help. As far as editing goes, I have found quite a few wonderful and not terribly expensive proof readers in the communities of that site and Goodreads.com. You can do a lot for your book but the two places where you should always invest a little green into is the cover and the editing. Thanks to the internet you can find reasonable places for these things if you poke around a bit. I find it far harder to get an audience to actually read your work. I've been a writer most of my career but I'm honestly known mostly as an artist. Why? It's far easier to get a person to take two seconds to look at a pretty picture than to get them to invest a half of an hour reading test. It seems to be the nature of our current culture.

I am going to be the awful person that says I skimmed through this post because it hit my interests but tonight I only have a few odd minutes to read everything. I hope your ventures work out for you and I did see quite a few people offering some very good advice and resources. I hope I added to that, if not repeated any. And really - one of the best things to do is find a way to promote locally too. My friend put out her first mid-teen fantasy book and she promoted to local places and had a really good book launch and follow up. Then she went on to promoting at conventions - specifically genre conventions. Conventions - fantasy, book ones, steampunk, horror, whatever, conventions are a wonderful way to interact with people and get people invested in what you're doing.

Alright, I'm going to shut-up now. Good luck! If you ever need cover art with tentacles... ah, just saying


Bethalynne
edit on 8-8-2013 by Bajema because: I type too fast and edit too poorly!



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 06:17 AM
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While I hope to one day get a literary agent and get published, this is a great topic full of resourceful information should that prove impossible. It's good to know that this route exists. And I wholeheartedly agree. The point of writing is the joy of being able to create the stories you've always wanted to tell but no one else ever has, and of knowing someone, somewhere is experiencing those stories.

Financial success be damned. (Though, since I'm literally incapable of doing anything else seemingly, being able to earn at least a meager living eventually would be nice lol. But if not... so be it.
)

Peace.



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 07:25 AM
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Hey thanks for the information. I have been working on my action/supernatural thriller/love story for a few years now and this organized set of information is very helpful. I really never thought about sample copies to insure that formatting is right, I just assumed that the publisher kept an eye out for such issues. SF



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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I have 3 titles on sale at various online sites (Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and Smashwords), and I have tried other sites as well.

My experience thus far, has been that Amazon is easily the best option for indie authors where digital distribution is concerned.

Ranking by sales for the four sites that I use is as follows:

1) Amazon by a wide margin.
2) Barnes and Noble (Nook Press).
3) Kobo
4) Smashwords

***NOTE***
Smashwords is more valuable to me than Kobo in the sense that I am able to gift copies of my books at will and offer coupons for any percentage as well.

Barnes and Noble, Kobo and Smashwords have been little more than an exercise in futility as far as sales are concerned. They are inferior with regard to their reach in the online market, and in this business, as you mentioned in the OP, reach and exposure are key factors to becoming successful in this endeavor.

As far as actual number comparisons, Amazon has continuously outperformed the other sites combined to the tune of 3 or 4 to 1 in sales (I have yet to sell a single copy of any of my books through Smashwords).

Where use of the tools provided is concerned, they are all fairly simple to get the hang of, with the exception of Smashwords and their 'Meat Grinder', which will cause many first time authors to pull their hair out in frustration, but this too can be overcome with practice and a quick reading of the style guide that is offered in digital format for free.

I have not tried to sell through Google Play, or iTunes yet (though I am looking into it); Google seems to have some very convoluted settings involved (I hope to have this figured out eventually), and it was my understanding that iTunes requires an ISBN for each book listed, which is out of the question for me, since an ISBN costs in the neighborhood of $150, unless you buy blocks of them for far greater amounts.

I have some experience with another online retailer as well, BookRix is an utter waste of time and effort; their site receives an extraordinary low amount of traffic which seems to drop month after month. They also have a waiting period of 4 weeks whenever you try to pull your book off sale to edit it in any way. For instance, let's say you have a book on sale with BookRix and decide that you wish to go exclusive with another retailer (such as Amazon), you would take the book off sale, wait four weeks for that to actually occur, and then delete the book, I haven't seen if this is going to require another four weeks, though I will once my grace period is ended and my book is no longer offered on their site.

Though it may seem that supporting the smaller dealers in the online sales war is a good idea, if you want to make money and reach the widest audience, stick with the big guys, it's your best bet overall, at least that's been my experience.

Good Luck!


***ADDED NOTE***
Apple apparently no longer requires ISBN numbers, though it is encouraged.
edit on 8/8/2013 by ProfessorChaos because: added content



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by Scaleru
 


I agree about short stories. I always hated writing them because I love expanding my characters, their relationships and the world they live in but the plus side is that it does force you to condense storytelling down to the bare essentials of what really matters. Not all of me agrees that "less is more" however, as my favorite writers are Dickens and Tolkien. Those Victorian style books had long, indulgent paragraphs of description which I personally enjoy. To each their own, I guess. But you do have a point that every sentence you do write should have substance and verve.

Too short can get you into trouble. My novel is a supernatural thriller and it is very short, when the word expectation for that sub-genre is quite high. It was one small detail which I overlooked when I wrote it. Everyone advised me "you're an 'undiscovered writer,' so keep it short," and then oops! Too short...


The info on pricing came from an ebook which the owner of Smashwords released. I think there are three ebooks (for free) which give all sorts of info on getting published on Smashwords. In one of these he mentioned the price which has sold the best. I'd highly recommend reading these if you want to publish on Smashwords. I am still reading them myself. I've also read that it's a bad idea to give your first book away for free (or cheap) because it just makes you look like a desperate wannabe. So much of being an 'author' is in image. You should come across as smart, charismatic and confident. Your pricing should reflect this.

Good luck.



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Scaleru
 


I should also add that you're probably right about agents. I'm thinking of going directly to the publishers myself. I'd love to find an inside contact, or a contact of some kind, but this isn't easy (I'm far better at acting and public speaking than social politics.) I guess, being an artist, I want someone who can appreciate my art and represent me to the publishers. An ebook would probably be the best way to go these days. However, with more and more writers going to ebooks now this may open up space to be heard by the print publishing world.

It all comes down to skill and good timing, no matter how you look at it (the right idea in the right place, at the right time.)



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by LoneCloudHopper2
reply to post by Scaleru
 


However, with more and more writers going to ebooks now this may open up space to be heard by the print publishing world.


Though your post wasn't directed at me, I just felt the need to point out that the traditional publishers still do not take e-books seriously; the odds of them entertaining the idea of publishing unknown authors are no better than they have been historically.

Making a name and a following for yourself through self publishing is your best bet to receive offers, or even the slightest attention from print publishers.



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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Bajema
The industry has changed drastically over the last decades, but unfortunately, publishers are still keen to get as much as they can out of their authors, so you still have to be careful about lost originals etc. Unfortunately, some of them still try to take advantage of younger authors, which is in my opinion, disgraceful. It really is a shame that you lost all of your original artwork, but the computing mantra comes to mind here: BACK UP! Always keep a copy for yourself, or give them a copy and keep the original.

I would agree with CreateSpace. They are a fantastic resource IF you are willing to handle the leg work yourself. If you need to get in touch with them to resolve issues, they can be a little withdrawn, which unfortunately means that you're going to have to wait for responses. You have to remember though, they are working with countless budding authors, and don't always have time to immediately respond.

Proof readers are always a great idea, and if you can find one that is willing to work for cheap, even better. You really should find someone that has a genuine interest in your field though, which might make things a little harder. It's one thing to find someone that loves sci-fi, but if you're writing fantasy, they may not be able to make the adjustments that you require. Investing in a professional cover is also a great idea, but the same applies here I feel. You need to find someone that works with the same style artwork as your style of writing, or it may not suit.

I think the majority of the issue comes down to time. You need to invest a lot of it. A LOT. It's one thing to publish a novel, it's another to get it read. Promoting locally is a brilliant idea though, and one that I've not explored to any depth as of yet. Quite simply, I lack the time. Along with all the tips that I've offered, and those offered by other members, hopefully someone will get some use out of this thread


AceWombat04
Just remember, nothing is impossible! Do your research on the publishing houses, apply for those that deal with your subject matter almost exclusively. If you submit your fiction paper to a house that primarily deals with non-fiction, you're going to have a lot of trouble getting noticed. If, however, you submit it (say it's fantasy) to a publisher that works almost exclusively with fantasy writers, then ensure that you have presented a concise and detailed cover letter to go along with it.

I may do a little further research and offer up some more info later on publishing through the traditional route... It's something I've considered, but never really tried, as I've been put off by the difficulty of it, but it doesn't hurt to look!

Just as a side note: Agents aren't necessarily the best way to go. Yes, they are better recognised by publishers, and yes, they have an in, but what cut will they take from you? Will they include you in the contract process should your work be accepted? Will they include you when editing comes, and the publisher wants to remove 2/3 of a chapter and replace it? I'm not saying they won't, but I'm not saying they will either.


cbaskins
Great to be a help to someone! Yes, sample copies are a MUST. Most of these print on demand companies will print exactly what you present to them without question. This may mean that some of your text or images may be cropped or not printed correctly at the sides of the pages. It may even mean that your cover cuts off half your name!

On the flip side, if you go through traditional methods and are "signed" by a traditional publishing house, they handle all the finer points themselves, though it is still a good idea to get a pre-print copy to ensure that you're happy with the physical size, text size, layout, etc etc, even the quality of the paper. They will listen to you.

ProfessorChaos
I've not had any experience with B&N or Smashwords, so I can't really comment there, except that I've heard Smashwords is quite a wide reaching site. I do find it amazing, however, that Amazon appears to have taken the lead with your sales. I've found Apple to be the best for me. While I don't make "sales" very often, my free short story is downloaded several times a month, where I've had almost no action on Amazon at all.

iTunes no longer require an ISBN for publishing, though you do need to have an Apple yourself to be able to run their software. Yes, they have custom software for publication. If you do want to get an ISBN however, they can come quite cheap. I get mine through a company in Australia for $80 each, or a block of 10 for a much better price.

I would avoid smaller retailers, not due to their lack of experience, but the small sales won't justify the extra effort.

As to your second post: Well, I'm in two minds here. Most people are avoiding that route, like myself, which is lowering the number of submissions to traditional publishers, making it a little easier to get noticed (theoretically). Not sure...



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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LoneCloudHopper2
I'm partial to Tolkien myself, which lends itself to my own writing. I do tend to waffle on at some points, but during editing, I clear most of that up. Out of curiosity, how short did you go?

Pricing is a tricky creature, it seems to change shape with each market you encounter. On one site, you may be best to go with higher pricing, but on another, it will ensure you will never make a sale. Balance I think is the key here. Try out prices. Start low, then work your way up. Nobody wants to find a book they purchased drop price the day after they got it, so you may alienate your otherwise potential future market.

In regards to agents, I've mentioned them above. You just have to be careful with them, and you'll go fine, but if you're not sure, stick with approaching publishers yourself, which I have also touched on above. And again, above for my thoughts on the traditional route in regards to "opening up space".

S. J. Vellenga



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by Scaleru
 


Great thread. Thanks for sharing your experience with us and providing a springboard for others to provide related information.





posted on Aug, 9 2013 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by Scaleru
LoneCloudHopper2
I'm partial to Tolkien myself, which lends itself to my own writing. I do tend to waffle on at some points, but during editing, I clear most of that up. Out of curiosity, how short did you go?

Pricing is a tricky creature, it seems to change shape with each market you encounter. On one site, you may be best to go with higher pricing, but on another, it will ensure you will never make a sale. Balance I think is the key here. Try out prices. Start low, then work your way up. Nobody wants to find a book they purchased drop price the day after they got it, so you may alienate your otherwise potential future market.

In regards to agents, I've mentioned them above. You just have to be careful with them, and you'll go fine, but if you're not sure, stick with approaching publishers yourself, which I have also touched on above. And again, above for my thoughts on the traditional route in regards to "opening up space".

S. J. Vellenga


I forget the exact word count but it is just below the 70,000 novel word limit (at 60,000-something, I believe.) It has 12 long chapters, told between four different characters. It all works so perfectly and comes together so neatly that it really shouldn't, and can't, be messed with. It's been in the works for a long time, when considering it was inspired by a dream I had in my youth. I always wanted to write it into a story and it finally took shape a couple years ago. I wasn't satisfied with the original version though and it was written in longhand, so rather than typing it off word-by-word I just rewrote it one day and it turned out great. I'm very proud of it, but the word count may be a problem.


My favorite 'novel' is actually "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens, which is technically a novella. Some of the best stories are short, I think. The problem is, today, with sub-genres and market projections, the industry seems less flexible about word counts.

Thanks for the advice. Struggling authors need all we can get.

Interesting note: J. K. Rowling released a crime novel under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith called "The Cuckoo's Calling" and despite positive critical reviews it only sold 500 copies. As they weren't selling, it was 'leaked' that it was actually Rowling and now they're selling like hotcakes. A lot of writers who find lighting once can find it hard a second time. Stephen King began writing under the pen name Richard Bachman to answer the "talent versus luck" question but felt he was outed too soon to tell. Perhaps Rowling's experience is an indication. What if Tabitha had left the early chapters of "Carrie" in the trash, where Stephen King had initially dumped them? Food for thought.

Edit: I said rewrote it "one day" but that is of course just a figure of speech. It was more like two weeks (just for the rewriting stage, not counting all the creative and grammatical editing which followed.)
edit on 9-8-2013 by LoneCloudHopper2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2013 @ 10:41 PM
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If you want us to comment on the book cover you have to show us.

To put it another way : Pics or a linky. The linky would be better since it proves you are an author. Come on! Play fair. Prove you all have a published book so we know you are really an author. Then perhaps some kind soul may do a book review.

To prove that I am an author and to discuss my cover.

Linky

Please note: This is not advertising! It does prove an ability to offer good experience.

OP. Nice thread. HAve you looked at bookbaby? I was very happy with them.

P



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 12:35 AM
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Phew, after a long weekend of renovations, I'm back.

MrInquisitive
Glad to be of help!

LoneCloudHopper2
Don't feel limited by word counts or that you need to be categorized. Neither of these things are true. Writing is just another form of art, and art itself cannot be defined. If you feel that your work portrays the ideals of a novel, why not call it a novel? If you feel it more portrays a giant spaghetti monster, call it that


In any case, you should be proud of your work. Imagine back as a child. Would you have thought that you would write a 60,000 word story? Hell, you'd probably have cringed at the thought of a 2,000 word essay!

When it comes to editing, I'm in the same boat as you. I type all my work, but I then print it out and edit on paper, choosing to retype the whole work again after I have noted changed etc. Of course, this allows for a second round of errors: typos and grammatical. These are then edited out on the screen.

In regards to Rowling, my opinion is a little biased here as I don't like her writing style. I think the mistake she made was going from a simplistic, childish style, aimed directly at a younger audience, to an audience that requires more depth, but carrying over the same writing method. This is all speculation, since I've not read the pseudonym novel.

But that does bring up a good point. What if some of the noted works of the last centuries had been forgotten? How many people have taken that first strike too personally and given up on a fantastic work?

pheonix358
Why not use this site as a resource for feedback? My links are below:

The Immortal Tales: Kri
Rakah L'Sterah (The Immortal Tales: Origins)

Kri is the full length novel, which is using stock imagery supplied by CreateSpace. Rakah L'Sterah is a short story, roughly 20,000 words, of one of the main characters of the former. I purchased the image for this one from a stock image site, though I do not have exclusivity, and I'm not particularly happy with it. Well, I'm not particularly happy with either of them.

For Kri, I went with the mountain as it is symbolic of the beginning and ending of the story. The other is written in a style similar to Anne Rice's "Interview with the Vampire", hence the manuscript. It's a direct interview with the character in question.

If anyone is interested, Rakah L'Sterah is available through ibooks and kobo for free.

I like your cover. If I had to question any part of it, it would be the text. It's difficult to distinguish your name from the background, and on a black and white screen, it may be even harder. I take it the story revolves around a young boy who, in a sense, acts free as a wolf, and not a direct "a boy and his wolf" story?

Edit to add: I had a friend that worked with BookBaby's sister site, CDBaby. They weren't overly happy with the support etc, and steered me away from them. I've done a little research, but nothing too extensive.

S. J. Vellenga
edit on 12/8/13 by Scaleru because: added



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by Scaleru
Phew, after a long weekend of renovations, I'm back.


LoneCloudHopper2
Don't feel limited by word counts or that you need to be categorized. Neither of these things are true. Writing is just another form of art, and art itself cannot be defined. If you feel that your work portrays the ideals of a novel, why not call it a novel? If you feel it more portrays a giant spaghetti monster, call it that


In any case, you should be proud of your work. Imagine back as a child. Would you have thought that you would write a 60,000 word story? Hell, you'd probably have cringed at the thought of a 2,000 word essay!

When it comes to editing, I'm in the same boat as you. I type all my work, but I then print it out and edit on paper, choosing to retype the whole work again after I have noted changed etc. Of course, this allows for a second round of errors: typos and grammatical. These are then edited out on the screen.

In regards to Rowling, my opinion is a little biased here as I don't like her writing style. I think the mistake she made was going from a simplistic, childish style, aimed directly at a younger audience, to an audience that requires more depth, but carrying over the same writing method. This is all speculation, since I've not read the pseudonym novel.

But that does bring up a good point. What if some of the noted works of the last centuries had been forgotten? How many people have taken that first strike too personally and given up on a fantastic work?


S. J. Vellenga
edit on 12/8/13 by Scaleru because: added


Yeah, I can go on and on about art and what it means to me and used to mean to culture, but I am trying to be realistic about the publishing world as a business. I hope you're right and the word count doesn't mean no deal for me automatically. I believe in it and I want to keep trying.

I'm not a big fan of Rowling's either. She brought nothing new to fantasy literature and although I think she's a smart writer (in terms of knowing how to sell,) I wasn't that impressed when I tried reading her first book. It reminded me too much of "A Wizard of Earth Sea," but...I digress. Her success reinvigorated the publishing industry, especially for fantasy, so everyone seems to feel that they must praise her. Exaggerated reviews, rewards...I'm not sure if she qualifies as a hack but she isn't very original either. And personally, when I think fantasy I think escape, and the last place I'd want to escape to would be school! lol that was actually where I did most of my daydreaming and developed my creative writing lol

But yeah, art is what it's all about. Somehow the modern culture turns it into everything but: business, false personas and social climbing, etc. If I have to swim through a sea of BS I will, whatever it takes to get published, but I won't sell out on my art.

Hmm...we need a warrior smilie



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 11:07 PM
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LoneCloudHopper2
Hmmm, while I don't think that Rowling is an accomplished writer (in ability, not in $s), I do think she deserves some praise. To an extent. She brought reading back to the forefront of children's minds in a time when computers and television are threatening to take over. She reinvigorated the dying art form for a new generation. Kudos there.

However, when I see other authors, such as Stephanie Meyer, and the impact that they have had on the industry, I silently weep. I recently saw a meme on this very topic. Three reviews on the original Dracula, all giving it 2 or 1 stars, each saying that it was not up to par with todays language, that the story dragged on due to the use of "old English". Two of them went further to say that if the author had read Twilight (as we all know, an impossibility/travesty), the novel may have been much better. Truly saddening.

However, this should not affect our determination to continue our own writing and self expression. If you are planning on submitting to a traditional publishing house, they will take on your work if they think it is good, not based on a word count. Self publishing? There are pretty much no limitations except your ability to sell yourself. You could sell a book of 300 blank pages IF your marketing strategy was right, just in the same way that you could sell a book with 2 pages with the right plans.

In any case, good luck! Don't give up!



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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On a somewhat related topic, I'm waiting to hear back from staff here at ATS as to whether I am permitted to start a topic for authors to share links to their work. Fingers crossed.

S. J. Vellenga



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by Scaleru
 


Thanks for the inspiration and insight. Yeah, I agree with you. Agents may not be the best way to go. But on the condition that I can actually find one who is honest and willing to make a deal favorable to me (especially creatively) then I'd go that route if it was advantageous to my goal.

I care more about getting published in some form at all than money, so whether that be self-publishing and not making very much if any, traditional publishing and not making much, or not making much because of agent's cut, all that matters to me is that people read what I read at the end of the day.

That's all premature though for now as I'm still in the research and outlining phase. I've written all my life, but only now want to make a serious attempt to write something I consider the best work I can possibly do and try to get published.

As you say, I believe nothing is impossible. I plan to try until I succeed or die. Nothing else I can really do in life lol. What have I got to lose by trying right?

Thanks and peace.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04
reply to post by Scaleru
 
What have I got to lose by trying right?


Try not to think of it as trying, just write.

I went through a bit of a panic attack when I published my first book, and I had to reconcile myself with the fact that not everybody would like my writing, I would get occasional bad reviews and such, but that there would be at least one person out there that would enjoy my work and that would be good enough.

While I haven't had 'blockbuster' success, I've done fairly well for an unknown author, averaging about 10 copies sold per month, and now with my other books hitting the shelves, I'm seeing that number grow.

My point is, don't do it for recognition, do it for you, and then it will have far more meaning regardless of the popularity; you have nothing to lose if you publish your writing, and if you don't, you'll always wonder what would have happened if you had.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by ProfessorChaos
 


Well that goes without saying. I wouldn't be doing it if I didn't love it and didn't have stories I wanted to tell. My favorite thing about writing is just the simple fact that it empowers you to tell the stories you've always wanted to see told but no one else has.

But I'd be lying if I said I didn't also want someone, somewhere, to read what I create. Even if it's only five people.
But by "trying," I just mean I have nothing to lose by having enough self belief to entertain the notion that more people than that might want to.

Peace.
edit on 8/14/2013 by AceWombat04 because: (no reason given)






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