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Graphene supercapacitors created with ‘traditional paper making’ process, rivals lead-acid batte

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posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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This could be a game changer right here.
A battery for your phone with the same kind of power as a lead acid battery.
In a small size because the graphene is so thin that in a gram you can have the same area as a bunch of tennis ball courts in a gram.
And can hold 90% of it's charge for some 300 hours.
Pretty amazing.

If only this can be mass produced then we'll have phones that you'll charge every 2 weeks.


Materials engineers at Monash University in Australia have devised a method of producing graphene supercapacitors that have the same energy density as the lead-acid battery under your car’s hood. Not only are these supercapacitors about 10 times more energy-dense than commercial devices, but the method of producing the graphene inside the supercapacitors seems to be novel as well. The engineers say they used a process that is similar to traditional paper making — and that it could easily and cost-effectively scaled up for commercial production of graphene, and graphene-based supercaps.

Supercapacitors are essentially small batteries that can recharge and discharge almost instantly. While this results in a very high power density (lots of watts), their energy density is generally very low (watt-hours). For a conventional supercapacitor, we’re talking about a power density that’s 10-20 times higher than a conventional lithium-ion or lead-acid battery — but on the flip side, the energy density is 10-20 times worse. In short, supercapacitors are fantastic for when you need a short burst of energy — such as a quick burst of acceleration from a car’s kinetic energy recovery system (KERS) — but useless for powering everyday consumer electronics, like your smartphone.

Graphene

Graphene, however, could change all that. The amount of energy stored by an electrochemical capacitor is closely tied to the amount of charge-carrying electrolyte that contacts the electrodes. The higher the surface area of the electrodes, the more charge-carrying ions that can be adsorbed (attached) to the electrodes, thus storing more energy. You can probably see where this is going. Because graphene is the thinnest known substance, it is capable of providing an astonishingly large surface area; somewhere on the order of thousands of square meters (that’s multiple tennis courts) per gram. The surface area is so large that graphene could be used to create supercapacitors that bridge the massive energy density gap between supercaps and batteries, while still retaining huge power density.






posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:19 PM
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Graphene may be one of the most revolutionary materials ever... even more cutting edge than silicon semi-conductors. The potential uses of graphene are astounding...


Integrated circuits ,Transistors ,Redox ,Transparent conducting electrodes,Ethanol distillation, Desalination, Solar cells, Single-molecule gas detection,Quantum dots, Frequency multiplier, Optical modulators, Additives in coolants, Reference Material, Thermal management materials, Energy storage, Ultracapacitors, Electrode for Li-ion batteries (microbatteries), Engineered piezoelectricity, Biodevices


These may just be the tip of the iceberg, so to speak...

Wiki



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Graphene batteries , Graphene phones , Graphene TV screens.... the future is Graphene

If this stuff can live up to its potential we could be about to enter a new age , game changing indeed .



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


This is really exciting.
Battery technology hasn't changed in many many years.

with smaller batteries we can have smaller thinner phones.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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Graphene IS an amazing substance.

The first I heard of it was here at this site. I recall thinking man, I need to invest in that stuff. But a
quick search of the web showed how easily it is produced and HOW MANY companies were
already devising new technologies from it.

If I remember correctly this substance, when correctly laid out in a sheet no thicker than Sara Wrap
could hold the weight of an elephant on a pencil head.....

So much potential with this stuff...and you can buy a bucketful to have for yourself if you want....
....its just carbon stacked together to make graphite basically



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Excellent thread and on a darker note these capacitors are also ideal for the implementation of rapid discharge storage necessary to generate a soft EMP as opposed to a nuclear hard EMP so are more likely to see implementation in the field of weapon technology before they do in household electronics.
This is due to the fact that graphene is an excellent conductor which has great superconducting potential and the cooling necessary to facilitate high rate discharge would be negligible compared to some current implementations.

This page is definitely worthy of a S+F thank you for this interesting read.

edit on 5-8-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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Double post.

edit on 5-8-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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4 years ago I saw on Sky news that they have found a way to charge conventional batteries in seconds by altering the way the power is funneled into the battery.

At that point I thought, Wow, now this is a game changer. Havent heard a word about it since, nor have I seen any type of battery opperated applience using this tech.

We will only see these products decades from now when their patents have long since expired. Duracel and the like will see to that I am sure.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Good find. This is a very interesting subject of study.

I was kind of surprised you made no mention of the link to another article at the bottom of the page.

www.extremetech.com...

I thought it may serve as some inspiration to am ATS member for further work.



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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Capacitors are cool and all but whats bugging me is the pic of the story--what are those RCA cables doing there? I know its not a pic from Monash Uni but capacitors that size would melt an RCA cable...

yeah I'll shut-up now



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by LABTECH767
 


Do you have any schematics for such a device?



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by cartenz
 


Well if I did I certainly would not put them up on the net as that is a Pandora's box and in the wrong hand's could cause targeted damage to electronic devices and infrastructure but as I am sure you are well aware the western military has had these devices for some time now, since before the second gulf war.
They can be built with existing component's, another possible use is in armour plating, Here in the UK some time back a variant on chobham laminate armour was developed but has as far as I know never been deployed, the basic principle was that between layers of the armour there was a capacitive layer that was kept at a very high potential and when a shaped charge breached the outer layer the electricity could discharge from the damaged section in such a way as to blast the plasma back out thus preventing plasma penetration of the armour, currently there are very few weapons that are effective against this armour so it was a test for a hypothetical scenario.
The armour on the M1 Abrams main battle tank is derived from early chobham and has an added depleted uranium layer which as far as I know we Brit's don't use but the same principle can be applied to it, Multiple layers of chobham with a dielectric layer charged to an extreme potential, now the Graphene comes in because of the very high potential discharge rate so it could be used to replenish the charge in connected section's if they were depleted through a shared discharge with the damages section.

No I would never post plans for a weapon, even an electronic disruption device such as an EMP to the net as all weapons end up being used on innocent people at some stage, It is merely that I think such a development potential will not have gone unnoticed amongst the relevant parties.

However the positive uses of this technology far outweigh such risk and let's hope the right people use it for the right application's.

edit on 5-8-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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UhYup :/

As iterated in earlier replies...as soon as you start talking about it extending the life of batteries in ANY way, it's all over, and you can bet it will be quashed immediately...no matter what else it would revolutionize.

The real question we should be asking ourselves here is just how many revolutionary inventions and discoveries have had the same potential, only to be put on the back burner, or in "they"re private pockets, while we all get to continuously and absolutely needlessly suffer through 19th century (sometimes 18th) technology that threatens to kill us every time we use it?


XL5

posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 01:34 AM
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Cartenz, I think they took that picture in a surplus shop, they just chose to hang the RCA's above normal capacitors (they seem like normal values).

I really wish they would post intructions, I would make some. If only the local stores had graphene and hydrazine.



posted on Aug, 6 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 



No time to think and reply - but want to follow - amazing.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by Monkeygod333
 


Originally posted by Monkeygod333
We will only see these products decades from now when their patents have long since expired. Duracel and the like will see to that I am sure.


Or it will arrive to consumers as a stripped down version like the current retail NiMH batteries. Traditional alkaline batteries will still have high(ish) capacity, while the rechargeable will have low capacity and short recharge lifespans.

I recently found an industrial NiMH supplier that has rechargeables with higher capacities than alkaline and (designed for industrial settings) longer recharge lifespans. I had given up on rechargeables until I found this supplier. Why would I pay twice as much for a rechargeable with 1/3rd the capacity of an alkaline and only lasts a few dozen recharges?

Now, I've gone from paying about $100 a month on batteries to $100 worth or rechargeables that I've been using since this time last year.

My point is that if the new graphene tech is watered down, many will continue to use alkaline. Hopefully, there will be a company that uses the new tech to its potential.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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Could this be applied to solar cells, to boost their ability to provide more energy in less space? Just curious, as that application was the first that came to my mind.

Love these kinds of threads, thanks for sharing!



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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Originally posted by grey580
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This could be a game changer right here.
A battery for your phone with the same kind of power as a lead acid battery.
In a small size because the graphene is so thin that in a gram you can have the same area as a bunch of tennis ball courts in a gram.
And can hold 90% of it's charge for some 300 hours.
Pretty amazing.

Iene could be used to create supercapacitors that bridge the massive energy density gap between supercaps and batteries, while still retaining huge power density.




what NONSENSE.

have any of you heard of the exponential discharge curve of a capacitor?

makes it useless for a battery.


have you heard of the dangers of lithium ion batteries causing fires?

well this will at least 10000 times worse.

has anyone here ever discharged a a 220 microfarad capacitor?

it makes a huge bang and dangerous spark.

now imagine a 10 farad capacitor being short circuited.

it will explode and blow you head of as all that energy will be discharged in less than a second.


XL5

posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 07:54 AM
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Beckybecky, it can be used as a battery even with that problem. If the energy is there, its there, it doesn't just go away. Sure a boost converter to keep the voltage from sagging would be used to get all the energy out, but if it lasts as long as they say it does, that extra cost will not matter much.

As for shorting the leads, you are not suppose to short the leads on anything that carries that much power anyway. Crashing a plane into the ground is also bad news, people don't stop flying because of that though.



posted on Aug, 8 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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Originally posted by XL5
Beckybecky, it can be used as a battery even with that problem. If the energy is there, its there, it doesn't just go away. Sure a boost converter to keep the voltage from sagging would be used to get all the energy out, but if it lasts as long as they say it does, that extra cost will not matter much.

As for shorting the leads, you are not suppose to short the leads on anything that carries that much power anyway. Crashing a plane into the ground is also bad news, people don't stop flying because of that though.



looks like every device needs a nearly flat nearly steady line voltage to operate reliably.

do you even know what a capacitor discharge curve looks like?

it looks like a hockey stick or the letter J in a mirror.it 's totally useless as a battery.

also just imagine terrorists getting one of these super high energy density capacitors the size of a lead acid batrery.they could destroy a whole block of flats by simply short circuiting it with an iron bar.


this tech should be banned as it a terrorist threat to us all.

just imagine millions of these capacitors out there and terrorist using them as bombs.

they could flatten america in days.

remember these terrorists don't have the same values as we do.

the money should be invested in more drones to eliminate these terrorist monsters.

did you not hear that these monsters killed hundreds of people today in their so called "holy month".

they are barbarians.

i suggest urgent this technology should be banned.




edit on 8-8-2013 by beckybecky because: anxiety



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